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Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream
     

Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream

3.8 57
by Arianna Huffington
 

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It's not an exaggeration to say that middle-class Americans are an endangered species and that the American Dream of a secure, comfortable standard of living has become as outdated as an Edsel with an eight-track player—that the United States of America is in danger of becoming a third world nation. The evidence is all around us: Our industrial base is

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Third World America: How Our Politicians Are Abandoning the Middle Class and Betraying the American Dream 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 57 reviews.
RobertS_PhD More than 1 year ago
Adrianna Huffington does a good job of describing the ongoing destruction of the middle class. I found the real-life stories of individuals and families that have been impacted particularly compelling. The degree of income concentration in the United States is really quite shocking. My major complaint is that Huffington fails to indentify advancing technology as a primary driving force behind income inequality. This is an important point because if technology (along with globalization) is a major culprit, then in tells us something about the future: Things are very likely to get even worse. We're sure to see more advanced automation and also new technology that makes it even easier for companies to offshore work. Even the upper middle class is not going to escape this tend. The basic reality is that technology and globalization are making our labor worth much less and giving workers less and less bargaining power. For a great overview of this issue--and a focus on the future rather than the past--I'd strongly recommend this book: "The Lights in the Tunnel: Automation, Accelerating Technology and the Economy of the Future." It shows how advancing technology will very likely lead to structural uemployment and even more extreme concentration of income into the hands of the few. As someone who works in the technology field, I'm convinced that the trends described in this book are already well underway and explain, at least in part, the situation that Huffington describes. As "The Lights in the Tunnel" points out, this problem may ultimately be so big that it defies conventional solutions. I highly recommend that anyone concerned about the plight of middle class Americans check out this book and give these issues some serious thought.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really did not think I would agree with anything Arianna Huffington had to say but I think she was right on, everything she states you can see is happening now.
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CharityDuGood More than 1 year ago
I'm too tired to write a great review, but just want to say it was an enjoyable read, awesome solid statistics and comparisons, very motivating, if you're into changing the world, or at least your town, then give this a read. I consider it a must read for anyone that wants to get involved with 2012 political debates and anyone interested in international relief work.
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atomsplitter More than 1 year ago
I loved A. Huffington's previous book, Right is Wrong, but this book seems to be missing much of the meat that made her previous book truly interesting. It seems like her commentary in this book is common sense and hardly packed with Earth shattering revelations. We all know that the middle class are the people that pay their taxes and get the shaft when times get tough. Huffington is preaching to the already converted, those that are not Republican. The book is filled with pages and pages of notes and bibliography that make up about a third of this book, so it isn't a very long book to read but it makes it difficult to justify the high ebook price. For a better read on the inequity of taxation and the erosion of the middle class, I'd recommend Linda McQuaig's "The Trouble with Billionaire's". It might have too much of a Canadian slant for some American readers though.
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