×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tiger, Tiger
     

Tiger, Tiger

3.9 53
by Margaux Fragoso
 

See All Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 1250002427

ISBN-13: 2901250002425

Pub. Date: 01/31/2012

Publisher: Picador

A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book for 2011
A Globe and Mail Best Books of the Year 2011 Title
Tiger, Tiger is a Publishers Weekly Best Nonfiction title for 2011
A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction of 2011 title

One summer day, Margaux Fragoso meets Peter Curran at the neighborhood swimming pool, and they begin to play.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Tiger, Tiger 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 53 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this memoir- it is hard to gind books so eye-opening while at the same time still stories. Sometimes it was a little hard to stomach... but it was honest and held a lot of truth.
room145teacher More than 1 year ago
Fragoso gets caught in vice between her mentally abusive father and a pedophile with highly practiced manipulative skills.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book blew me away. It's gut-wrenching, dramatic, and impossible to put down. It made me cry. It made me open my eyes to this serious issue. If you have kids or will have them, you need to read this!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved the book with the detailed and at times my stomach became tied in knots and I would pause than find myself opening it back up to continue to read it. I found myself reading Tiger Tiger until the end. Truly can understand at a child's point how this predator was actually someone she looked up too. Of course, the predator was so manipulative. I hoped that she would just stop wanted to see him,however, because of her family situation. Well I don't want to spoil the memoir. It's for sure an eye opener. Would recommend it. I feel the editing for this book was great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's rare to see the experience of sexual abuse told from the young woman's perspective. That alone makes this a profound and important work. What makes it truly amazing is that we too can experience all the varied emotions that it leaves in its wake. Many girls have to face abuse alone and in silence so it's great to see someone confront it with courage and strength.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am literally speechless. The bravery it took to relive and write this memoir is unfathomable
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HERE
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Impossible put down
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pounces biteing it on the neck and killing it
YoyoMitch More than 1 year ago
What Amy Hammel-Zabin did in Conversations With a Pedophile, (by bringing her readers into the mind of a Pedophile), Dr. Fragoso does for the victim of such a predator.  Reading Dr. Fragoso’s account of the years she spent enthralled with a “caring” older (by 43 years) man is the stuff of nightmares, horror stories made so, and drastically compounded by, the fact of what she speaks was her reality. Few books have caused as intense reactions within me than those I experienced as I read this first person account of a victim of childhood sex abuse. When Margaux Fragoso was 7-years-old, while she and her mother were in a park near her home, a man (Peter, who is older than her father) asked if he could join in her play.  Within a year of that meeting, he commits his first violation of his new, trusting friend.  For the next nine years he took advantage of her father’s volatility and her mother’s mental illness to repeatedly violate the young Margaux. After his health became such that he could no longer harm her sexually, he continued to manipulate her into being convinced that he was the only one who could truly love her. It was only with Peter’s death that the author found the freedom to write of this relationship and to see what had actually occurred within that connection.   The book is a revelation of the experience of sex abuse.  The process Dr. Fragoso details is a classic example of what a victim of sex abuse becomes in order to survive this trauma.  She speaks graphically of some of her abuse and her internal processes, as well as her world-view, as they developed in response to the harm done to her, are difficult to grasp unless one has some experience of this kind of pain. Yet, because of an open writing style and ease of expression the reader has the ability to grasp some of this experience without having to face the author’s peril. My best friend (and wife) noted my dark mood the week I was reading this book, so deeply was I affected by its content.  By turns, I was angry, sickened, filled with dread, hopeful, hopeless, helpless and empowered as I progressed through its pages.  In my profession, I have sat with numerous victims of sexual abuse; I have heard their pain, witnessed their courage and admired their strength.  After this book, I feel a deeper sense of appreciation of these individuals.  To see how many of them have moved from “victim” to survivor to thriving in overcoming the evil done them gives me pause to be thankful and amazed; thankful for the opportunity to journey with them and amazed at these heroes. Fortunately, Dr. Fragoso did not remain a victim of her abuse. She overcame this trauma to earn a Ph.D. and to write a book that is a much needed resource. This book needs to be required reading for anyone in, or preparing for, the counseling or other helping profession.  It supports the research of the predatory behavior of Pedophiles; offers, both directly and by suggestion, how to protect children from such people, imparts insight into many of the behaviors of those who have been the prey of such individuals and gives first-hand (of a fashion) experience of sitting with those harmed.  Anyone who chooses to read this book needs to be aware of the pain they will experience as they “witness” the harming of a child.   This is NOT a book for children, it is a MUST read for anyone who has the responsibility to protect children. 
iluvvideo More than 1 year ago
An amazing memoir of the author's youth and adolescence and her relationship with her friend, the pedophile. That's right. FRIEND! In this book Ms Fragoso does the unthinkable. She brings us inside her relationship with Paul, a friend to Margaux's mother and herself, who groomed her from age eight to become a sexual partner for himself at the time almoast 60! Probably the most chilling aspect is that Paul is not your drooling, raincoat wearing, pervert. He places himself in the path of this family, an abusive father, mentally ill mother and fragile Margaux herself. She wants love from an adult she can depend on. What she gets is a form of attention, which she experiences as love that Paul insinuates himself in her life to the point Margaux believes in their mutual love, that an uncaring world would never understand and so must be kept secret. Mom, Dad and just about every adult in this story seems not to see (or acknowledge) the terrible things happening to Margaux. Yes of course the sex games, but also Margaux's depression, confused self image and ultimate belief that she will marry Paul and live happily ever after! But like almost any relationship built upon lies and deception, it begins to unravel. And Margaux remains a dedicated friend to Paul until the climax where she becomes painfully aware of the awful truth of the relationship. Margaux writes this tale in brutal first person remembrance. No one is spared, no detail is too gruesome as to be avoided. Eventually she comes to terms with her past and starts building a life of her own, college, husband and family. But there is never the day of reckoning for the pedophile. He sickly, slickly gets away without societal judgement and sanction of his acts. There is no big payoff. No conclusion. And that only makes this scarier ans more plausible still.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LivieBelle More than 1 year ago
So entrapping
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago