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Tracks
     

Tracks

3.8 8
by Louise Erdrich
 

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North Dakota Chippewas fight for survival in the early 20th century. "Even readers won over by Louise Erdrich's two earlier works may be surprised by her third novel. Tracks is a stunning and powerful book: it is by far the most impressive installment."--Boston Phoenix

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Tracks 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Randomadder More than 1 year ago
You can't go wrong with any book by Louise Erdrich.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was absolutely amazing! I was a little bit confused when I first started it but as I got into it became one of those books I just couldn't put down. Louise Erdrich does a beautiful job of showing the two cultures clashing by using two different generations as the narrators, Nanapush who represents the Native culture and all of it's beliefs/traditions, and Pauline, who denies her Native American heritage and considers herself completely white. With the central character Fluer, who could easily be a symbol of Native American culture as a whole, showing many signs of resistance this book was just mesmerizing!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In keeping with the development of Erdrich's rich, fictional Native American saga, 'Tracks' takes her characters one step closer to reality. Contrary to initial impression, the novel does not limit itself by cultural lines. Erdrich's work provides an insightful and engrossing tale, which highlights the struggles of a frayed culture. However, spoilers abound and surprises go unappreciated for those who haven't read her previous works first. Erdrich makes brilliant use of alternating narrators. One speaker is a highly spiritual grandfather named Nanapush, and the other a crazed and confused Indian woman called Pauline, retelling the life of protagonist Fleur. Both offer differing slants when shedding light on Fleur's troubles, including passage through a suicidal youth and falling in love with shy Indian boy Eli. Rich imagery, and the short-and-sweet figurative way of Native American storytelling may be a bit much for some. However, the manner of speech fits the novel beautifully for those so inclined to a book of this type. Interesting, not mind-blowing, it is an honest and sufficient work in the representation and preservation of a culture.