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Train
     

Train

4.6 23
by Pete Dexter
 

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Train is a 18-year-old black caddy at an exclusive L.A. country club. He is a golf prodigy, but the year is 1953 and there is no such thing as a black golf prodigy. Nevertheless, Train draws the interest of Miller Packard, a gambler whose smiling, distracted air earned him the nickname “the Mile Away Man.” Packard’s easy manner hides a proclivity

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Train 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Oh... Well I hope you do okay out there all alone." She meowed sadly "Be careful" she added(sorry not good and goodbyes...)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks in
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
O.o
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im herw
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read a lot of novels that touch on similar subjects without being barraged with offensive language. A writer can paint an accurate image without it. I really was not able to get into the story because of all the foul language. The only reason I gave this book even one star was because we are not given the option of a negative rating.
JNJN More than 1 year ago
Dexter's TRAIN is probably the best book I have read by him and I have enjoyed all that I have read. I just finished SPOONER which I enjoyed so much I picked up TRAIN. They are very different styles and types of stories as anyone who explores them will see. TRAIN is outstanding in his building of characters and the subtle touch he has in building description and plot. He touches on very important issues such as racism, the deep emotional impact of events on some of his characters. He spins a great yarn, building tension also with a sense of humor and the absurdity of humans too. I just thoroughly enjoyed this book and was sorry to see it end.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Train of the title is the nickname of an 18-year-old, thoroughly intimidated black caddie with super-star golf potential. But the novel ¿ set in LA in the 1950s ¿ isn't about young Train. It's about the man who befriends Train, Miller Packard, a police sergeant with a history of brawling and violence. Packard's friendship for Train is based on his compulsion to put himself in dangerous, threatening situations. He is drawn to such confrontations as inevitably as an addict to dope. Mentoring Train into a golf hustler is no act of charity. In his talented black hustler, Packard discovers a pliable, enormously gifted golfer whom he leads into the depths of ultra-high-stakes golf gambling ¿ and in one memorable match, into the heart of a whites-only, exclusive club in Milwaukee patronized by violent, psychotic players. And that's just the kind of precipice where Packard feels alive. Chaos, physical danger and inevitable confrontation are what drive Packard, and in his young protege, Packard finds the perfect train to ride, albeit a Train who is completely unaware of his real role. This a first-rate psychological thriller backed by a solid narrative and intelligence.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 1953, eighteen year old black caddy Lionel ¿Train¿ Walk works at the exclusive Brookline course in Los Angeles. The membership is quite homogenous and consists of racists, elitists and sexists who like the staff and the other caddies treat Train. with contempt bordering on the wrong side of abuse except police sergeant Miller Packard. Train realizes from the first hole that Packard is the ¿Mile Away Man¿ because he has a fair game, but Miller has no concentration for the sport. However, Miller pays better attention than anyone realizes as he concludes that his caddy has real skills for the sport.

Train is fired from Brookline, but scores a job as a groundskeeper at dilapidated Paradise Developments. He helps renovate the course, but loses his position due to a tragic accident. Packard wants to help the lad so he turns Train into a golf hustler. As they travel the country together, they win thousands on the youngster¿s skills, but soon Train will learn once again the violent underbelly of the leisure game he plays.

Perhaps no author can display the darkest side of life as easily as award winning Pete Dexter can. TRAIN is a fast-paced eighteen holes starring strong characters trying to do the right thing, but the message is even charity can turn abusive. The story line is a warning that a caring method with a seemingly constructive output does not necessarily mean a positive outcome. Readers will appreciate this deep dark character study, but be warned that Mr. Dexter will escort you to the most profound, deepest, but darkest corner of the soul.

Harriet Klausner

Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks back to camp
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not to many actions in any post. Youve got the general idea tho
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Someones answered your question in scarlet letter...
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dexter has a style all his own,thus the 2 stars. Otherwise, I found the prose to be more dime story dramatics. Novels that get wrapped up in gutter talk belong in the trash.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*she walks in her eyes glinting. A tatoo of a eagle is on her back* Hello.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No wherw
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
*she wanders, humming.*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's a 3-way tie, each of us with one vote.