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Traveling Music: Playing Back the Soundtrack to My Life and Times
     

Traveling Music: Playing Back the Soundtrack to My Life and Times

4.4 7
by Neil Peart
 

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In March 2003, Neil Peart, the international bestselling author of Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road, a haunting, critically acclaimed, and award-nominated memoir, was thinking about life's eternal "Now what?" questions. The previous year, Peart, the lyricist and Hall of Fame drummer of the legendary rock band Rush, and his bandmates, Alex and Geddy, had

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4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are a fan of the greatest North American Band of all time, 'RUSH' (as I am). Or perhaps just a music lover, musician or someone who truly loves exceptional writing. I highly recommend Neil Peart's latest installment - 'Traveling Music'. He once again displays his writing genius and 'paints a beautiful canvas' for the reader of his 'What Now' journey from his home in California to Texas. Along his sojurn, he plays a vast array of music ranging from Sinatra to Linkin Park to Madonna and to the grand finally 'Vapor Trails'. From recounting his childhood memories of listening to his father's musical favorites, to 'The Who', right up until modern day music such as 'Vertical Horizon'. For each artist,song and orchestration, Neil provides the reader with a little history for the current CD that is playing in his BMW, as well as his personal memories and emotional attachment to that particualr song and artist. Neil also outlines in perfect detail the many changing landscapes of Americana and the interesting people he meets along the way. Another caveat is the inclusion of some of his other travels recounted in both 'Ghost Rider' (a truly touching story) and 'The Masked Rider'. As a lyricist for 'RUSH', Neil has always been a great inspiration to me and has proven time and time again what a gifted writer he is. Looking forward to the next book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Wiz74 More than 1 year ago
I have read almost all of Peart's books and have enjoyed them all, but I had held off reading this one. I was under the impression that it was just about the music he liked to listen to while traveling. I came to find out that it's an autobiography mixed with music reviews, mixed with travelogue. It's been a great read and I'm sorry I held off reading it until now. I should have known it would rock!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is a telling part in Neil Peart's 'Traveling Music' where Neil, perhaps my favorite musician of all time, describes the band Linkin Park's appeal to him by writing, 'It occurred to me that another reason I appreciated Linkin Park was because I had no idea what they looked like, or how they projected themselves visually...I had no idea where they were from, what age they were, what race they were, what kind of haircuts they had, or even how many of them they were. It was just about the music.' Well, being an amazingly huge Rush fan, and having Neil Peart shape a lot of my mostly conservative/libertarian views, I did know more about him than that...but not enough to say WHO he was. 'Ghost Rider' did a lot to fill that in, but not nearly as much as 'Traveling Music,' and, sorry to say, I am now a little sad that I've gotten to know more about the man behind the music. Finishing this book coincidentally around the time of the National Review's 'Top 50 Conservative Rock Songs of All Time,' with two of Rush's works prominently featured, I was sad to see that, actually, despite somewhat of a grudging respect for Ayn Rand, Neil actually is nowhere near conservative/ libertarian himself. Even worse, there seems to be a certain innate smugness and arrogance to the man, which some might have seen before (and apparently have, according to some of his anecdotes), but somehow or other, I thought that that was just a reaction to seeing so many people on the road, of not having a complete sense of privacy -- in other words, that deep down inside, Neil Peart would be a nice man to talk to. I think, having read 'Traveling Music,' that he would be...but only on HIS terms, and if you happen to hit him wrong, there goes your chance of friendship with him. (Although, of course, even in his memoirs, he says nothing about his complicity in losing his privacy via courting the spotlight the way any musician of renown does - such introspection and admittal would've been most welcome.) The book itself is good, and I appreciate much of his views on American musical icons like Frank Sinatra and Patsy Cline and music both popular and otherwise in general -- however, I still think that most progressive rock fans would be aghast to learn of Peart's respect for Madonna and 98º (?!?) and seeming obsession with The Beach Boys. Much as with that of 'Ghost Rider,' the ending of 'Traveling Music' is also anomalous, with the story of Rush's involvement with the SARS benefit concert at Toronto back in 2003...rather than congratulate himself on his (admittedly improving) prose-writing skills, Neil needs to concentrate on his denouement-building. Overall, I tried very hard to separate my growing (and surprising) disdain for the man and separate out his writing...but, heya, that's hard enough to do when dealing with a memoir. Will I love Neil's music, past and future? Always. The man himself, though? Eh...I must just be getting old...