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A Tree for Emmy
     

A Tree for Emmy

3.0 1
by Mary Ann Rodman
 

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A Tree for Emmy 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ChatWithVera More than 1 year ago
My thoughts: The book presents an interesting lesson about variety of trees. Note: it is not a tree book or a truly instructional book about trees, leaves, seeds, etc. The story revolves around Emmy, a little girl full of energy and who her grandmother describes as stubborn and wild. Grandmother also describes the Mimosa tree as stubborn and wild. Describing a will-growing tree that is hard to get rid of is one thing. To describe a child as stubborn and wild and consider it a positive trait is hard to understand as a favorable trait. It is true that stubbornness in a child is indicative of a strong will which when guided and tempered with control can lead to a strong leader in adult life. However, to praise a child for being stubborn and wild without tempering it with controls and leadership by the adults in the child's life can only lead to an adult that is a loose cannon and that is a destructive leader. Now the story is cute in that Emmy wants one of the pretty Mimosa trees (I, too, think they are beautiful and wouldn't mind having one in my yard.). So that is what Emmy asks for as her birthday present. She and her parents look and look but cannot find one to purchase since they are considered "wild" trees. They return to grandmother's and Emmy finds a little, tiny shoot of a Mimosa tree which they dig up and take home to plant. Emmy learns that she must protect her new seedling and care for it even though it is a wild tree. As I said, the story is cute and Emmy learns a little about trees and young trees. The book is pretty and the illustrations are very nice. Emmy looks like a loveable and delectably irresistible child. I can see the book being used to teach the tenacity of wild trees and how they are stubbornly difficult to rid oneself of. I can also see object lessons on stubbornness in a child being drawn from the story by astute adults. DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy of A Tree for Emmy" from Peachtree Publishers in exchange for my honest review. Opinions expressed are solely my own.