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The Twelfth Card (Lincoln Rhyme Series #6)
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The Twelfth Card (Lincoln Rhyme Series #6)

3.6 47
by Jeffery Deaver
 

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Lincoln Rhyme & Amelia Sachs are back! A hitman is out to kill a young girl in Harlem. In order to save her Lincoln has to solve a cold case that's over 150 years old.

Unlocking a cold case with explosive implications for the future of civil rights, forensics expert Lincoln Rhyme and his protégé, Amelia Sachs, must outguess a killer who has targeted a

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The Twelfth Card (Lincoln Rhyme Series #6) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
XMan More than 1 year ago
For over the past decade, bestselling mystery writer Jeffery Deaver has astonished readers with the creation of Lincoln Rhyme, the fictional quadriplegic who, throughout the notorious series, has successfully answered the one question lingering from everyone's mind: how can you solve a crime that you cannot see? Throughout the books, fans have become aware of not only the elevated brilliance of the well known criminalist, but also of the love interest that he shares with his partner, Amelia Sachs. Despite of the some of the graphic crime scenes that two have had to encounter behind the yellow police tape, Deaver fails to deliver in THE TWELFTH CARD. In this sixth series entry, the duo take on a case that they have never took on before; one that has gone cold for 140 years. Throughout the entire case, both Rhyme and Sachs try in their best efforts to protect Geneva Settle, a sixteen-year old Harlem student who nearly gets ambushed by a crazed assassin in the beginning scenes of the book. By digging further into the investigation, Rhyme and Sachs later discover that the ruthless assassin may be after her because of a term paper she is working on regarding Charles Singleton, a former slave and an ancestor of Geneva's. Moreover, they find out that the madman who skulks Geneva leaves his calling card of the Hanged Man, the "twelfth card" in the tarot deck. They also discover that Charles witheld a devastating secret that he found to be too ahamed to reveal. Thoughout the investigation, questions linger through Rhyme and Sachs: Why is this crazed madman on the hunt for innocent blood? What secrets are lied within his calling card? And most important, what type of "secret" would Charles have had been veiling for all this time? Sad to say, Deaver disappoints his fans in this entry. Throughout the majority of the narration of the book, readers will become exposed with various slang that they will happen to find tedious. Such figures of speech impedes Deaver's main talent in psychological writing. As he did in THE STONE MONKEY, the author yet again fails to deliver what makes this series enjoyable for readers. A key literary element that seems to torpedo Deaver's attempt lies within the one-dimensional character development of not only Rhyme, but of also the majority of the other remaining characters. Througout the investigation, the interaction of characters made by Rhyme lackes the ecstacy that made the disabled criminalist popular. Without a doubt, Deaver fans will also get the impression of having their intelligence insulted. Thoughout the book, the author provides a myriad amount of historical detail based on hearsay rather than actual research. Fans will become annoyed by his deversion from the well-known police procedural into a tale of historical uncertainty. Sure enough, readers will realize sooner or later that the details provided in this book was not anything in which they have learned or studied in history class. THE TWELFTH CARD is yet indeed another disappointing attempt by Deaver. By the lack of character development and research, readers can certainly argue that this churning is actually a publication deadline rather than a piece of literature.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not up to what we expect of Deaver. Try one of tbe earlier Linciln Rhymes thrillers. by aj west
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first book by this author i have read. Good pacing and believable charictors. Now i have to get the rest of the series. If uyou are looking for something to keep your interest look no farther
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Stones399 More than 1 year ago
Admittedly, this is the first Deaver book I have read, muchless a "Rhymes" series book. I have to make this short. But essentially it was an overall good read. Though predictable in the character's having access to all the necessary agencies and equipment. Not to forget, "arriving just in the nick of time" to thwart the criminal from completing his job. It was a book and I didn't ever not want to continue reading. It was my "lunch" book and did it's job of taking me away from the office for an hour.
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