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Victors Eisenhower and His Boys
     

Victors Eisenhower and His Boys

3.8 12
by Stephen E. Ambrose
 

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From America’s preeminent military historian, Stephen E. Ambrose, comes the definitive telling of the war in Europe, from D-Day, June 6, 1944, to the end, eleven months later, on May 7, 1945.

This authoritative narrative account is drawn by the author himself from his five acclaimed books about that conflict, most particularly from the definitive and

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Victors Eisenhower and His Boys 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
In-Quest More than 1 year ago
It is not easy for someone who did not live through it to know or understand what the American GI stepped up to face in our quest to defeat this threat to freedom worldwide. Much money, material and people where thrown into America's war time effort. Much time was spent on training for battle. Not every soldier got enough time to train or was provided with the training he would wind up needing. Also, as the book points out no amount of training can truly prepare you for actual combat. This book and others like it, which are based on interviews with the front line soldiers who lived through the fighting, are an effort to bring the non combatant reader to a closer understanding of how human these men were. How some of them were able to cope with the terrors of war better than others but all were tested beyond anything they would have thought they could take. Enough of them kept going and became The Victors. They saved the world from true evil. We won't know exactly how much they gave of themselves in this effort but books like this one just want to point out some of what they gave so they will be held in history as the heroes they truly were.
WorldReader1111 6 months ago
I enjoyed this book. It is, first, well-written from a literary perspective, with a clear, simple format that gets the information across. Second, the book is rich in content, being comprised of the author's comprehensive, first-hand interviews with the actual soldiers involved. Likewise, the book is substantial on multiple levels: as a well-rounded historical timeline of WWII, along with a solid breakdown of the war's complicated context; also, as a human study, both sociological and psychological, by way of profiling the war's key participants and their personalities. In these subjects alone, the book is an interesting and insightful read, presented with a reasonable amount of objectivity, perceptiveness, and consideration. However, what I found most valuable about 'Victors' was its wealth of raw, universal wisdom. Namely, the soldiers' accounts contain many life lessons, all of them universally applicable and highly powerful, as much on the battlefield as the football field. From the tales of heroism and exceptional character, to the descriptions of seemingly superhuman endurance, to the heartrending depictions of brutality and inhumanity (and the many philosophical questions raised as a result), the book provides endless examples of what we are capable of, both good and bad; subsequently, we are afforded much food for thought. Personally, I was made to rethink myself and my potential in light of the text, in addition to gleaning a wealth of other useful information, from the intellectual to the spiritual and everything in between. All in all, there is much to be learned from WWII's collective story, useful to everyone, of all walks of life, in peace and war both. In this sense, the book goes some distance, however small, in perhaps preventing future wars, by way of the potential for education and enlightenment it presents to the world at large. If I had to list a negative, it would be that which applies to any book comprised of personal, first-hand experiences: the issue of cognitive dissonance, and being unable to truly verify or substantiate the accounts of the events in question. However, this is less a flaw than a simple reality, created by the constraints of human perception and memory, and it does little to diminish the book's final effect. My sincere thanks goes out to this book's author, publisher, and subjects (who went through so much to bring the world the wisdom of their stories, coming quite literally "from the trenches"). I am grateful for, and have benefited from, your work and service.
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spikeMB More than 1 year ago
This book is a brief review of the major parts of the Allied European campaign in WW II. Ambrose brings parts of several of his other books into a relatively quick, but informative read. Having read the other books, I felt that I was repeating most of the material, but Ambrose weaves the material together well. He also gives a lot of thoughtful reflection on what it took to win the war. Many touching accounts are presented. An excellent book to introduce the subject to the reader.
Bella-Christenson More than 1 year ago
I have always enjoyed any book of Ambrose's I have read and Victors did not disappoint. The details he has always has in his books are vivid enough you see the action in your mind. My father got me started reading history books and said Ambrose is one of the best. He's right. I love that it's more alive than a 'history book'. You are thrown right into the middle of the battle, be it on the field or in a trailer. The struggle for what's the right thing to do and what's necessary is tangible and as always, the book is completely satisfying.