×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Watchlist
     

Watchlist

3.4 46
by Jeffery Deaver
 

See All Formats & Editions

Watchlist is a unique collaboration by twenty-one of the world's greatest thriller writers including Lee Child, Joseph Finder, David Hewson, S.J. Rozan, Lisa Scottoline, and Jeffery Deaver, who conceived the characters and set the plot in motion; In turn, the other authors each wrote a chapter and Deaver then completed what he started, bringing each novel to its

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Watchlist 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 46 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This two-in-one book features a new character set created just for this. That's what makes this book so refreshing because the storyline is completely new, nothing is borrowed from the characters featured in the best-sellers by those authors. There is very fast paced action from the first chapter to the last. In the middle though, these authors did 'play game' with each other. A character created by one preceding author was promptly removed by the next (author). It brings up the literal meaning of character assassination. Or one character introduced as the good guy would be turned and become a sinister one. So for a while, it really gets me guessing and wondering if the book(s) can have a logically plausible ending. Thankfully to my amazement, Deaver was able to sum up everything and put every character in order in the final chapters with his customary plot twist and panache. The book(s) is so enjoyable to read that I could not put it down once I grasp the flow of the story after the beginning introduction of the various characters. (So be warned, don't start the book if you don't have the time to indulge). Personally I like the new theme about international war criminals and terrorists here. I hope that this book can become a whole new series under Deaver, or from any of the other authors.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Unlike some composite books where every chapter is written by a different author, this book suffers from a lack of a plot outline. The first book suffers from an especially egregious mish-mash of writing styles that is really irritating to read. If you really like a tight and well-disciplined plot, this book is not recommended.
PennyroyalSP More than 1 year ago
It takes a little bit to get into the writing styles of each contributor. The effort is worth it.
Wiliam_Maltese More than 1 year ago
TWO BOOKS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE … STILL NOT WORTH IT It sounded like an interesting idea, had by one of my favorite mystery writers, Jeffery Deaver: One International Thriller writer starts writing a novella but hands it off to another International Thriller writer at the end of a chapter … who hands it off to another mystery writer … who hands it off to another mystery writer … handings-off continuing until the novella is finished. Then, the process starts again on a second novella until its completion. Both bound up in the same double-book. Alas, for this reader, neither novella worked all that well. “The Chopin Manuscript” was just the tale one more manuscript, with one more encoded text, containing one more secret that could kill a whole lot of people. With a cast of seeming thousands, of myriad nationalities, representing a plethora of governments; all out to get access to the manuscript and its secret. So many characters, in fact, this reader needed a scorecard to keep track. Way too many plots and subplots, too many apparent good guys turning out not to be good, and bad guys turning out not to be so bad. Too many characters just too damned clever for their own good. In short: Too many authors, without a well-defined initial outline, ending up way too many cooks in this literary (and I use the word loosely) kitchen. “The Copper Bracelet” was no better. More nefarious and arcane clues to bad things, only this time inscribed on a copper bracelet, or, as it turns out, on several of them. More countless characters, many of them left over from “The Chopin Manuscript” (not killed), but five years later. Another plethora of bad guys and bad governments. Repeat myriad locations: China, Kashmir, Pakistan, India, the U.S…. Too many twists and turns, as regards what’s going on, as each author, at the helm for his chapter, tried to be more clever than the last, and the next, by adding his own complicated, more often than not confusing, twists and turns on events. People, bad and good, way too clever in deciphering insights from clues so esoteric as to have anyone wondering, “How in the hell did they derive THAT from THAT?” Too many instances of mysterious “information sources” suddenly able to supply key data necessary to keep the story going. More instances of good guys turning bad, and bad guys turning not so bad. And a dead person, not really dead, thrown in, like the proverbial kitchen sink. I knew these two novellas weren’t holding my interest when I kept wondering when they would end, since they COULD HAVE ended, and SHOULD HAVE ended, but I knew there were yet more twists to go, more bad guys really good, more good guys really bad, because there were still twenty or more pages for me to read until the end. It was like sitting in a movie, everything seemingly over and done, except there were those extra fifteen minutes to go when I always knew the monster had yet to be revealed as not dead at all but ready and able to head right on into the franchise’s next sequel. I wish this work had been better. I’m sorry that it wasn’t. Like collages in the art industry, that can look as if they’ve been composed by the artist throwing things haphazardly at the canvas, I came away thinking THE WATCHLIST was the literary (and, again, I use that word loosely) equivalent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago