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The Way Through Doors
     

The Way Through Doors

3.7 10
by Jesse Ball
 

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With his debut novel, Samedi the Deafness, Jesse Ball emerged as one of our most extraordinary new writers. Now, Ball returns with this haunting tale of love and storytelling, hope and identity.

When Selah Morse sees a young woman get hit by a speeding taxicab, he rushes her to the hospital. The girl has lost her memory; she is delirious and has no

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Way Through Doors 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A beautiful little book of fable-like stories, characters and scenes that meld into one another, and shifts in space and time that are both awkward and completely natural at the same time.I can imagine some readers might be put off by the non-linear nature of the story, or maybe consider it "gimmicky" - but for me it worked very well. At it's best, the book not only perfectly captures altered logic of cause and effect that we see in our dreams, but in fact creates a dreamlike state in the reader that lingers for quite some time after putting the book down for the day. That's one of the things I liked best about it, I'd read just a little bit and move on to something else but my mood and outlook was always altered in a rather pleasant way by what I'd read. It makes any kind of surprise more welcoming.Another great aspect of this book is the fact that while it certainly falls under the category of "experimental fiction" in terms of its non-linear plot and characters that seem to exist simultaneously as multiple people at once.. it's still not only easy to read, but has the style and atmosphere of an old world fairy tale. In fact this match between the almost childlike prose associate with fables and the "dream logic" that holds the events together is a perfect combination.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A nesting egg of a book. Stories within stories, showing great imagination and an unconventional narrative. An adventourous read fit for anyone looking for something different but rewarding
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LisaThePizza More than 1 year ago
I guess I just like stories that actually sort of make sense and go somewhere. This book did neither. The characters live in some weird alternate reality, and tell stories about another alternate reality, and it's a little hard to tell where one reality ends and another begins. The guy's creepy, the girl makes no sense, and the ending is just weird. Again, if you're into that sort of thing, then you'd probably love this book. Me, I just wanted the time back that I spent reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A veritable maze of a book. Alice in Wonderland meets 1001 Tales of Arabian Nights. A very post-modern book for people that want to read deeply and ponder selfhood, memory, time, and subjective reality. If one is not well read or only likes simple books with a straightforward plotline, this book is not for you. But those that are well read, like a diversity of literature, are more intuitive than sensing, and have an active and imaginitive mind, this book will serve as a wonderful catalyst for provoking and challenging one's perspectives on "reality."
BeijingSteamer More than 1 year ago
If you enjoy long winding and interlocking stories, this is for you. I found that this was to plot driven and not character driven which is what I like. Also, it seemed anti-climactic. I still don't even know if there is a climax. This is a great book for ANALYSIS. If you need to research a book, this is it. The technique is 100% avant garde. Side note: The narrator seemed creepy in a stalker way.. quite odd.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jon_B More than 1 year ago
A beautiful little book of fable-like stories, characters and scenes that meld into one another, and shifts in space and time that are both awkward and completely natural at the same time.

I can imagine some readers might be put off by the non-linear nature of the story, or maybe consider it "gimmicky" - but for me it worked very well. At it's best, the book not only perfectly captures altered logic of cause and effect that we see in our dreams, but in fact creates a dreamlike state in the reader that lingers for quite some time after putting the book down for the day. That's one of the things I liked best about it, I'd read just a little bit and move on to something else but my mood and outlook was always altered in a rather pleasant way by what I'd read. It makes any kind of surprise more welcoming.

Another great aspect of this book is the fact that while it certainly falls under the category of "experimental fiction" in terms of its non-linear plot and characters that seem to exist simultaneously as multiple people at once.. it's still not only easy to read, but has the style and atmosphere of an old world fairy tale. In fact this match between the almost childlike prose associate with fables and the "dream logic" that holds the events together is a perfect combination.