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The Woman Who Walked into Doors
     

The Woman Who Walked into Doors

4.0 13
by Roddy Doyle
 

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From the Booker Prize-winning author of Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, the heartrending story of a brave and tenacious housewife 

Look for Roddy Doyle’s new novel, Smile, coming in October of 2017

Paula Spencer is a thirty-nine-year-old working-class woman struggling to reclaim her dignity after marriage to an abusive husband and a

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Woman Who Walked into Doors 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This novel was written by a man but really gets into the heart of a woman. It tells the story of an alcoholic, poor battered Irish woman. It is told with sensitivity and heart. The stream of consciousness storyline only reinforced the chaos that characterised her life.
Lindsie More than 1 year ago
This is the first book I have ever read by Roddy Doyle. The story is told with both accuracy and sensitivity yet it took off on a few directions which made it drag a bit. The author really didn't get into Paula Spencer's battered soul until the last 50 pages or so. It took a lot of pre story to get to that point. I was hoping to get a bit more on life being a victim of domestic violence. I will say it was wel written and an acurate story told by a male author. He shows some sensitivity which was nice.
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DiniOv More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for an advanced reading class and I have to say out of all the books we had to read, this one was my absolute favorite. I never read a book that implemented that writing style, the confusion and intermixing of past present and current timing really pulled me. I felt this woman's pain; I questioned her sanity, her choices and even her uncertain future. It was a very good read.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a huge Roddy Doyle fan and this lives up to my expectations of him. I loved Paddy Clarke HA HA HA and look forward to reading Paula Spencer. This story was moving and gripping and ultimately very sad. You could feel the pain and the struggle against the bottle and her confusion of why she stayed married to the man who beat her. She freely admitted that she loved him too much to leave. The way she felt about her children was so honest. It is so hard to believe that this was written by a man and not an abused/ alchoholic woman.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Roddy Doyle¿s latest novel, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors, is not a book that I fell immediately in love with. Doyle speaks through the voice of Paula Spencer, a woman recovering from both alcoholism and an abusive marriage. His plot jumps around erratically; the chapters jolt from her husband¿s death to Paula¿s early relationship with him. Stylistically bare, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors is Doyle¿s assertion against domestic violence. However, despite the confusing plot and the Doyle¿s blatant solicitation of emotions, Paula Spencer has a realness and an honesty that caught me by surprise. The novel opens with a young, nervous Guard at Paula¿s door. She knows before he even tells her that her husband is dead. The next chapter is Paula¿s first encounter with Charlo Spencer¿her future husband. The rest of the novel jumps back and forth from Paula¿s struggle with alcoholism to her days in grade school and to her wedding night. Its erratic plot lends disorder to the story, a characteristic that does not necessarily detract. Instead, it adds to the sense that Paula is speaking to, almost chatting with, the reader. Reminiscent of a made-for-television movie on Lifetime, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors is obviously making a political statement¿Paula constantly cries for someone to notice her plight. ¿I¿d have told them everything, I swear to God I would have. If they¿d asked. I¿d have whispered it. If they¿d asked first¿ (202). Doyle is trying to provoke action about domestic violence, and chooses to use the voice of a woman struggling with it herself, rather than by making a generalized statement about abusive relationships. He finds a powerful means to get his point across with Paula Spencer¿s believable genuineness. Paula¿s character has an honesty and a dignity that make it hard to believe she is fictional. Roddy Doyle¿s voice has brilliantly disappeared, and Paula comes alive as a human being¿with both strengths and faults. She loses herself in her own lies, ¿Once, I heard a woman near me telling the nurse that she¿d walked into a door, and I believed her. I felt sorry for her¿ I never once thought that I wasn¿t the only one who¿d been put there by her husband¿ (200). Her sincerity is tragic and convincing at the same time. The Woman Who Walked Into Doors is not an easy novel to like¿nor is it easy to forget. Despite a confusing plot, and a cry for action against domestic violence, Roddy Doyle makes Paula Spencer a completely convincing character. He manages to tell her story through her eyes¿without an apology, and without self-pity. The Woman Who Walked Into Doors is a moving novel¿powerful and vulnerable at the same time.