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Women of the Silk
     

Women of the Silk

4.1 35
by Gail Tsukiyama
 

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In Women of the Silk Gail Tsukiyama takes her readers back to rural China in 1926, where a group of women forge a sisterhood amidst the reeling machines that reverberate and clamor in a vast silk factory from dawn to dusk. Leading the first strike the village has ever seen, the young women use the strength of their ambition, dreams, and friendship to achieve

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Women of the Silk 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a beautifully written novel set in a time and place that few Americans are well acquainted with. The 1920's and 30's were a time of tremendous social and political upheaval in China. This is a fictionalized account of the lives of young girls who were sent by their families to work in silk factories. The two central characters come from very different backgrounds. Pei comes from a poor and uneducated rural peasant family. Lin was born into a wealthy, cosmopolitan family; which has fallen onto hard times. The well drawn supporting characters are primarily their family members and fellow women of the silk. The author has enriched the story with details of Chinese culture, geography, history and more. This serves to gently educate a western reader, without judgement or comparison. This first novel is a definite accomplishment.
DrOrigami More than 1 year ago
Early writing of Tsukiyama and I read it after others. Not as good as Street of a Thousand Blossoms or Samurai's Garden. The picture of China in the 1920's from the perspective of a rural girl forced to work in a silk factory. I agree with other reviewers that the plot is quite secondary to the characters and writing style. It is a pleasant read but not the author's best work. I think readers should come here after they have tried others and just enjoy the writing style.
Keywi More than 1 year ago
One of the best books I've read. Pei is one of the most courageous girls I've read about. :D
Fox-Run-Reader More than 1 year ago
Learning, through this book, about working in the China Silk Factories during the 20's/30's was definitely worth my time. I also found the "Sisterhood" of these young women and the "Hair Dressing" ceremony to be very interesting. I didn't connect as closely with these characters as I have with those in other books but Tsukiyama does have a really nice writing style that made this an enjoyable read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really like other books by Gail Tsuiyama, but this one was a waste of time. It was boring. It was informative, but i should have just read a text book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was really good but there was not enough going on in it for me. Pretty much she was a silk worker and her friend died. After reading another of gail Tsukiyama's books(Samurai's Garden)I was looking for more then I expected.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book reminded me so much of 'The Good Earth' by Pearl S. Buck regarding the setting of the poor people of China. I enjoyed the book and felt for the main character as she endured her many losses of her family and friends. I wanted more of her story and have since purchased the sequel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Simply written but so descriptively written. You can feel the sparseness of her house as a child, see the land she grew up on, feel how cold her father was. The detail of life at the silk houses is conveyed so well you feel as if you are right alongside Pei, Lin, Chen Ling, and Ming, and just when you think you've reached the denouement, surprise. The reader will want to reach out and hug Auntie Yee just like they would their own mothers or grandmothers. Historical fictions are always worthwhile, and this one particularly so. I will read more by Gail Tsukiyama.
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teenab More than 1 year ago
Gail Tsukiyama's poetic prose makes this tale of a very politically challenging era of Chinese history a must read. She incorporates issues of separation, growth and lasting friendship into a credible yarn of women in the silk making industry. Not an action-packed thriller, but well worth the read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KATHERINE LLINAS More than 1 year ago
This book is not only interesting and beautifully written, it is also just a wonderful story. The author has a talent with expressing the simplistic beauty of the japanese culture.
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hunterTJ More than 1 year ago
This period novel is character driven, but gives you a feel for the social changes China underwent during the early to mid 1900(s). At the heart it is a women's empowerment story, and although some characters were underdeveloped, it will leave you hoping for a sequel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this book very much. The story flowed well throughtout the book. I enjoyed the story of Pei and the sisterhood. I can not wait to read more of her books, if this one is the example of how she writes. I guess the only thing I did not like was the small indication that they are gay. I thought that was not needed in the story.