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The Word for World Is Forest (Hainish Series)
     

The Word for World Is Forest (Hainish Series)

4.3 16
by Ursula K. Le Guin
 

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The award-winning masterpiece by one of today's most honored writers, Ursula K. Le Guin!

The Word for World is Forest

When the inhabitants of a peaceful world are conquered by the bloodthirsty yumens, their existence is irrevocably altered. Forced into servitude, the Athsheans find themselves at the mercy of their brutal masters.

Desperation causes

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The Word for World Is Forest (Hainish Series) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In the far future on the pristine world of New Tahiti is a wilderness Eden that Captain Davidson and other earthlings want to exploit for profit. He has already begun cutting down the trees. If it means the primitives die so be it as collateral damage often occurs when yumans conquer Mother Nature. The native Athsheans are horrified over being massacred and enslaved. However, the vilest crime by the off-worlders is destroying the forest as their Word for World is Forest. Fearful of this new powerful God who is brutal on their former forest deity and on them, the Athsheans know there is little they can do but obey as violence is not in their make-up although Selver tries to lead an insurgency, which only further threatens his people's way of life. This book was published over thirty years ago; long before Avatar. The story line is fast-paced while using a science fiction base to make a case that the "White Man's Burden" left Africa ruined and places like Tahiti devastated. Still relevant after all these decades, readers will appreciate Ursula Le Guin's classic novella of bloodthirsty avaricious outsiders destroying a peaceful Eden for profit. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay, that may be a little hyperbolic, but really these are incredibly thought provoking and gery entertaining
crcoord1 9 months ago
A precursor to the Planet of the Apes series? Good book, didn't think it was anything "award-winning", sorry Ursula!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Worth reading! As are all of LeGuin's books. this one tells partially of the origins of the Yeuman society.
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cb_2009 More than 1 year ago
An excellent story and writing. I cannot believe I did not discover Le Guin sooner. I highly recommend it. It's very thought-provoking and disturbing. If you like sci-fi, fantasy, and anthropology - this is for you. Also, the director of Avatar acknowledged this novella as an inspiration for the film. So if you like that then should definitely read this.
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Peter Sparklin More than 1 year ago
Short and engaging. A great read that deserves multiple visits.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The publisher's note mentions the bloodthirsty yumens well, these military men (specifically, the lead character) aren't just bloodthirsty--they're fanatical. The allegorical connection of this story with the Vietnam War gives it power and resonance, but depicting the occupying force as slave-owners pushes the reference too far. It's one thing to question whether the reasons for going to war are justified, and quite another to suggest that we should never fight any war because the men who fight are inherently evil. Of course, we should do everything possible to eliminate war altogether LeGuin's feminist solution is to completely reorganize society along matriarchal lines (depicted in her later novel 'Always Coming Home') this radical ideology informs her depiction of the army man (in some scenes he's nearly foaming at the mouth), and, in my opinion, mars an otherwise excellent novel. The story of the natives is far more interesting than that of the occupying force. Maybe she felt the need to amp up the action, given some of the criticism she received for the mellowness of her previous books she just went too far the other way is all. Overall, I recommend this book to lovers of quality science fiction it is interesting and exciting to read.