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The World Below
     

The World Below

3.8 17
by Sue Miller
 

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From the author of While I Was Gone, a stunning new novel that showcases Sue Miller's singular gift for exposing the nerves that lie hidden in marriages and families, and the hopes and regrets that lie buried in the hearts of women.

Maine, 1919. Georgia Rice, who has cared for her father and two siblings since her mother's death, is diagnosed, at nineteen,

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World Below 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
LibbieBond More than 1 year ago
Doomed romances and relationships, numerous deaths and family secrets, and stories from the past and present set the standards for a great book. Sue Miller's book, The World Below includes all characteristics, and starts off with potential to be a great read. However, a few pages in leaves readers wondering how it could be a New York Times Notable Book and a National Bestseller. With weak characters, predictable plot, and awkward relationships, The World Below is a huge letdown. Cat Hubbard, two-time divorcee, escapes across country in the dead of winter to rural Vermont. Staying in the home of her grandparents and where she grew up, Cat tries to find herself again. While rummaging through the attic, she stumbles upon her grandmother's journals. The book then rotates between present day, Cat's childhood, and her grandmother's life; each time period as boring and forgettable as the next. 50-year-old Cat, trying to remember who she used to be, remains in Vermont for several months until her pregnant, middle-aged daughter goes into labor. Cat zooms back to California leaving multiple strings hanging. An awkward and unfit relationship with 70-year-old historian, Samuel, and rediscovering herself included. Extremely drug out and depthless, Sue Miller's book falls flat. Every part is feeble and forgettable; characters, plot, and setting. The book deserves one out of five stars, maybe. All 275 pages creep sluggishly by, causing one to find better things to do; chores, laundry, or even homework.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Intresting book and introspective
Maertel More than 1 year ago
Plot moves along though characters need more for readers to care deeply about. I hope there is a sequel, involving Jessie and Samuel.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I liked the author's writing style and the development of the characters. I will recommend this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Another great book by Sue Miller. I loved the storyline of Georgia and seeing how it would have been in my own grandmother's day. I too was sent to my grandparents every summer for a number of years and this book put a lot of things into perspective for me. I thought it was very interesting. My only complaint is that I felt there wasn't really an "exciting climax". That felt sort of like a let down. But Miller's writing is superb and it was a great story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love the way the author attempts to understand the life/times of her grandmother. As the book developed, I found myself just as excited as the narrator was to fill in some of the blanks of her grandmother's life. History is like this--murky and indefinite. A good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a good book, definitely worth the read. If you like it, read Tending Roses by Lisa Wingate, which got five stars from me.