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The World of Null-A (Null-A Series #1)
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The World of Null-A (Null-A Series #1)

3.8 7
by A. E. van Vogt
 

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The classic novel of non-Aristotelian logic and the coming race of supermen

Grandmaster A. E. van Vogt was one of the giants of the 1940s, the Golden Age of classic SF. Of his masterpieces, The World of Null-A is his most famous and most influential. It was the first major trade SF hardcover ever, in 1949, and has been in print in various editions ever

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World of Null-A 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book in high school. Cant wait to read it again. I am sure its dsted but do what? So is shakespeare. A good story can hold its own. Put you mind in the time and enjoy a classic from one of the all time great SF writers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I rate A. E. van Vogt right up there with those other sf writers--Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke and Robert A. Heknlein--who sold me in my pre- and early teens on science fiction as my preferred field of reading entertainment. I first came to know van Vogt's great tales from a trilogy volume offered by the Science Fiction Book Club, of which I became a charter member in the mid-1950s at its launch. Contained between the covers of this, for the time, massive volume were van Vogt's titles "The World of Null A", "The Voyage of the SpaceBeagle" and "Slan". The stories were mesmerizing to an impressionable young reader who dared to read SCIENCE FICTION when this genre was considered to be trash. Here I was reading sf when, according to my English teachers, I was supposed to be reading "Silas Marner", "The Yearling", "A Tale of Two Cities" and the like, what the educational system considered to be true classics. I gladly took an F on the book report for "Silas Marner" (a crashing bore that I never did read to its end) and a solid C for my book report of "The Yearling" (only marginally less boring). Oddly enough, I earned an A+ for my "A tale of Two Cities" report, which I really did enjoy reading. My English teacher bluntly informed me that I would never make a success in any career having to do with the written word; and so I proved his contention by making a long career in magazine publishing as an editor and writer of technical matter. I have read van Vogt's "The World of Null A" at least five times since my initial reading and will likely read it again and perhaps again--it's still that good. The text may be dated, but making allowances for this, I find the author's ability to spin a fascinating tale more than worthy of the read. At the very least, a new reader will get the "feel" of what science fiction was like before Hollywood "legitimized" the genre. Any one of the three van Vogt books I cited here will fill the bill for a great read. All three, you'll find, make a home run!
Niles_Shrubbery More than 1 year ago
After reading the book I found myself wanting so much to take a shot at re-writing it, or wondering what it would be like if it were handed of to another writer with a better sense of human interactions and characters. It's bursting with great ideas, but ends like the author ran out of time. Still, a great example of 40's science fiction, and never boring from beginning to end.
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