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Xenocide (Ender Quintet Series #3)
     

Xenocide (Ender Quintet Series #3)

4.2 389
by Orson Scott Card
 

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The war for survival of the planet Lusitania will be fought in the heart of a child named Gloriously Bright.

On Lusitania, Ender found a world where humans and pequininos and the Hive Queen could all live together; where three very different intelligent species could find common ground at last. Or so he thought.

Lusitania also harbors the descolada, a virus

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Xenocide 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 389 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed 'Speaker', but 'Xenocide' left me sort of disappointed in the end. 350 pages of this sizeable novel are all philosophical rambling about the Descolada and things in general. It's not that some of it isn't clearly intriguing, but it gets tiring, and quite frankly, not a lot HAPPENS in this novel to pick it up. When something DOES happen, it can be really quite spectacular--Card crafts these moments extraordinarily well--and just for these moments 'Xenocide' may be worth the read, but be prepared think about alot more in reading this novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a good book. It picks up straight where "Speaker for the Dead" left off. I must stress, the book is rather confusing and meaningless if you haven't read the previous books. To be fair, it is a bit slow at times and may be confusing if you don't pay attention to the book and the concepts explained/proposed. Another thing is that you must keep an open mind to that which Card writes. He expresses philosophical concepts that may seem impossible and probably are. But that's okay, it's fiction. If you want science fiction that fits all of the perameters of known science you should give up searching for it. You will never find it. The point of science fiction is to surpass the limits of all known science and to stretch to the farthest corners of your imagination. Who cares if his fiction is unlikely? Was not Columbus's idea that the Earth was rounded rejected by many? -Demosthenes
PennameJW More than 1 year ago
This book is the third in a series of 4. But it is arguable that there are more and there are but here not the main 4. In the series there is Enders Game, Speaker for the dead (3000 years after the first one), Xenocide, Children of the mind. There ones only going to be three but the last one were too long and he has to split it into two. In no doubt in my mind that he is my favorite author. I loved it, although I do like all of the books in this is my favorite. It is my favorite because it has the most in-depth of them all. The reason it does it because it has the main climax of all the stories. So in this they haft to find out how to fix their main problems. How they do this is what makes it so great. How he can think of all this and make it believable is what makes him such an amazing. Even thought this book was written many years ago I think that it has such advance technology in it that it could be believable today. Not crap that would be pointless and stupid he puts things in his books that would make seams and would be applicable today. But I do haft to argue that people wouldn't like this because it is very confusing and it makes you think a lot and people just like simple books. That's what makes it so great in my opinion because it is a challenge to me and it gets me to use my imagination in ways that I never have before. So to cap it all I loved this book and I hope you will too after you read all the first books otherwise it will make no sense.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It has taken me a long time to come up with my final review of this book for you guys. Finally though, I've got it. So here goes: This book shows not only useful life lessons, advanced knowledge, and an amazing story, but is constantly making the reader want- no, have- to keep going. But many books are like this, as you notice. This however, was in a different way. Oh yes, it keeps on your toes, wondering about what's to happen next, just like a normal book. But this entire series is going to stay with you all your life, i promise. And this book is where that really comes out. So if i and a majority of others were so fascinated by this wonderful book, does that mean its comepletely flawless? No. Never. This book was probably the slowest and most confusing and avanced book of the ender series. I am inclined to believe that the majority of this vocabulary is for college students. However, if you are willing enough to understand this book, and if you truly love it, you will make sure you get something from it, learn from it. So overall, this book is highly reccomended to readers of all ages... if you think you're up to it. ;) :DDDDDDD
grumpie68 More than 1 year ago
I have read Enders Game and Speaker for the Dead. Xenocide is the rest of speaker for the dead. It picks up right where Speaker left off and is so far I've enjoyed it equally as well as the prior. If the overview of this story makes you curious read Speaker for the dead first it will make a lot more sense. You don't HAVE to read Enders Game that one can stand alone. These two Speaker and Xenocide are part one and part two of a story...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hi, my pen name is Dipilodorkus and i love books. This is a series that i personaly read when i was a child and as to be expected i did not realy get some of the realy deep and detaild sections of this series but i was still thouroly entertaind by it. It wasnt until ten years later that i picked up these books again and truely READ them and realised how deep and wonderfull this series is. I recomend this book and the other three too any and all book lovers on this earth who enjoy a good story. May you live in peace. - Dipilodorkus
daaviddw More than 1 year ago
I actually really enjoyed this book. There are parts that don't live up to the typical "Ender's Game" standards, but the book makes up for that by for the first time really going in depth about the philosophical and moral issues presented by the series. Card also manages to keep alive his recurring theme of an off-world impending military assault closing in on Ender. Card knows how to keep me interested. At points I found myself staying up until 4 in the morning because I couldn't put the book down. I recommend this book, and this series for that matter, to anyone who can read. It's just that good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book but it gets really deep, if you can understand what I am saying. This is not a action packed story. Lots of into the character's minds along with the Queen and the piggies.
stormyknitter More than 1 year ago
Although the author says each book stands alone, I find it really helps to read the series in order. Xenocide is a natural follow-on to Ender's Game, but there are books in between. I found the book fascinating from an anthropological perspective, and certainly a good read.
RussR More than 1 year ago
It's certainly not as good as the first two books. The story is still cohesive, but it pales compared to the previous two books.  So, honestly, this rating only reflects it's value against the other books in the series, thus far.  It's not my favorite in the series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book sucked in comparison to enders game. It was just really boring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why do almost all you weirdos have to have exciting and intense parts. I thought this whole series was amazing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If I could describe this book in one word it would be rollercoaster because that's how I felt while reading it. There were times when the story was really intriguing and stimulating and there were times when the story got boring and too complicated. For the most part, the story was intriguing though. Just like Speaker for the Dead, the book had much useful psychology so I really enjoyed that. Ender, and Valentine's character were further developed which was also interesting. Overall, it was a good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never red a book like it befor.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool book
Kerry_Nietz More than 1 year ago
“Xenocide” didn’t have quite the same pull for me that the earlier books in the Ender series did. I was interested to see how the author got the characters out of the seemingly unescapable jam he left them in at the end of “Speaker for the Dead,” and to his credit, I think he did that fairly well. But the pace was definitely slower. There were lots of interesting concepts (too many, perhaps?), the characters were handled well, and there were some fun twists at the end. It is a little thing, but I also really liked the small discussions between the buggers and the pequeninos that started most chapters. It was a neat touch that helped set the tone.  One portion of the story that seemed unnecessary was the whole Path subplot. While the idea of a planet constricted by OCD-like behavior was interesting, I don’t know that anything that happened on Path was all that critical to the main resolution of the plot. Were the inhabitants of Path added for the next book in the series? Not sure. Another thing that tweaked me in this book were the occasional historical inaccuracies. For instance, Valentine is portrayed as being well versed in history, yet she summarizes the Crusades as being the Christians’ reaction to “insults against their god.” I would guess that if Valentine were a true student of history, she would know that the Crusades were a lot more layered and nuanced than that, and that the First Crusade in particular wasn’t an act of aggression, but a response to it. I realize this is fiction, and the author has constructed a world where he has only Christians to somehow work into a frenzy…but still. All in all, though, I think Xenocide is worthy sequel to the earlier books. Clearly the author put a lot of thought and time into it. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry misclicked. There seems to be a lot of people who are misinterpreting the point of the novel. Card is ultimately trying to convey a theme of controversey. So what there are multiple biblical references? The point is that humans should not be limited by their own concious observations but should search for truth beyond themselves. Without doing so, we're no better tha animals who grub around in dirt. Card's novel was not meant to focus on the religions around us, but to contemplate and entertain the idea that humans may not be the ultimate beings.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Had to force myself to finish this book. After finishing i wished i would have bailed sooner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago