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You Don't Look Like Anyone I Know: A True Story of Family, Face Blindness, and Forgiveness
     

You Don't Look Like Anyone I Know: A True Story of Family, Face Blindness, and Forgiveness

3.6 31
by Heather Sellers
 

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A "poignant" (Boston Globe) family memoir that gives new meaning to hindsight, insight, and forgiveness

Heather Sellers is face-blind—that is, she has prosopagnosia, a rare neurological condition that describes the inability to recognize faces. Growing up, unaware of the reason for her perpetual confusion and anxiety, she took what cues she

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You Don't Look Like Anyone I Know 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Prepare yourself for sorrow and stark reality in You Don't Look like Anyone I Know. Illness propels this memoir, but the author's self-discovery of her face blindness and demands that her neurologist properly diagnose her, far outweighed any disquietude experienced by this reader. Coping with face blindness, the inability to recognize faces reliably seemed to me a secondary theme of this incredible memoir. Ms. Sellers' real triumph was surviving the war zone created by the illnesses of her parents. Her mother's paranoid tendencies, magnified by her protective instincts toward her children, were bizarre. Desperately desirous but fearful of seeing her father, Sellers manages to come to grips with his philandering and cross-dressing. In her book trailer, Ms. Sellers explains that prosopagnosia is a memory not a visual problem. She writes charitably and honestly about the family that branded her the crazy one. I didn't mind that her writing lacked cohesion at times. I thought it accurately reflected the chaos of her childhood. She manages to keep enough distance between herself and her story that I saw no self-pity. Rather she spoke graciously of her parents. At the end of her memoir she states that "deeply flawed love and deeply flawed vision can coexist." Reviewing a disturbing book is difficult. Many other reviewers have complained about yet another "disturbing childhood/dysfunctional family memoir." I agree many of those exist, but I submit that a book review is just that-a comment on the world the author has painted, not a woe-is-me about the reviewer's reading history. Despite the title, I found this memoir less about face blindness and more about the strength Ms. Sellers gleaned from her survival and her courage to trust her own perceptions. For a comfortable, relaxing read, find a romance novel. To unearth hard-hitting reality, sink your teeth into You Don't Look Like Anyone I Know. Reviewed by Holly Weiss, author of Crestmont
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I looked forward to reading this book, but honestly, I couldn't get past the first couple of chapters. The author really intends for the readers to believe she's taking a trip to see her parents and expects they will be "normal" (after what she supposedly went through as a child)? Really? I couldn't get past the first few chapters because it was so ridiculous a grown and educated woman would return to visit parents who she knows are mentally ill, and expect behavior vastly different. Also, the first few chapters contain numerous direct quotes involving conversations. I'm supposed to believe this is a nonfiction book when every conversation is direct quoted? Did she tape-record all of these conversations to know how to direct quote them? Again, it was a turn-off. Sorry, but I can't recommend this book. I think it's a work of fiction (as most memoirs are).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to keep reminding myself this book is nonfiction. Love the way it's written, as if it's a novel--an interesting treatment for the subject. So hard to imagine living through such a childhood and coming out whole.
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Angie Lampman More than 1 year ago
I had expected more! Although I found Heather Sellers' writing style pulling me in, I kept thinking there would be more that what I got. Don't get me wrong...I enjoyed the book, learning about prosopagnosia and what Heather endured but some of her story read like fiction. I sometimes forgot that it was a biography because some of it seemed a little far-fetched. It was OK....and I can't say that I wouldn't recommend....but I'd be picky who I recommended it to.
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Kaydebee More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. My husband met Heather and told me about the book, he even purchased the book for me. I found the story very moving.
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librarygal50 More than 1 year ago
Loved the book!! It is hard to believe that any child can live through a childhood like this and succeed. I would recommend this book and did not mind buying this. I had trouble tearing myself away.
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