1+1=5: and Other Unlikely Additions

Overview

How much is 1+1? Think the answer is 2? Not always, as this playful approach to addition proves! David LaRochelle takes children on a joyful mathematical journey that will engage their minds and teach them to think about numbers in a creative, outside-the-box way.
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Overview

How much is 1+1? Think the answer is 2? Not always, as this playful approach to addition proves! David LaRochelle takes children on a joyful mathematical journey that will engage their minds and teach them to think about numbers in a creative, outside-the-box way.
Brenda Sexton's wild and wacky illustrations add layers of witty fun to LaRochelle's clever game.

These wacky equations don't add up…or DO THEY?
1 goat + 1 unicorn = 3 horns!
1 set of triplets + 1 set of twins = 5 babies!
1 duet + 1 quartet = 6 musicians!
1 ant + 1 spider = 14 legs!
1 century + 1 decade = 110 years!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
For those who think math problems only have one right answer, this playful book offers a surprising number of solutions to 1+1. In one scene, a man and a cat push a wheelbarrow containing a pumpkin and watermelon. "1+1=hundreds?" asks a banner. The reasoning appears on the following page: "1 pumpkin + 1 watermelon = hundreds of seeds!" In another, the sun and moon grin at one another ("1+1=1?"). The explanation: "1 a.m. + 1 p.m. = 1 day!" An energetic and inventive spin on addition. Ages 5-up. (Sept.)
Publishers Weekly
For those who think math problems only have one right answer, this playful book offers a surprising number of solutions to 1+1. In one scene, a man and a cat push a wheelbarrow containing a pumpkin and watermelon. "1+1=hundreds?" asks a banner. The reasoning appears on the following page: "1 pumpkin + 1 watermelon = hundreds of seeds!" In another, the sun and moon grin at one another ("1+1=1?"). The explanation: "1 a.m. + 1 p.m. = 1 day!" An energetic and inventive spin on addition. Ages 5–up. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—This clever concept book asks children to take a fresh look at simple addition. Are there times when one plus one can equal three and not two? Yes—if you add one unicorn and one goat, you get three horns. Can one plus one ever equal five? Yes, because when you add one set of triplets and one set of twins, you get five babies. After sharing the numerous examples provided, children can be asked to stretch their imaginations and come up with their own quirky equations. Sexton's brightly colored digitally rendered cartoonlike illustrations are not only cheerful and attractive, but they also provide subtle clues. For example, in the one plus one equals three problem, the unicorn and the goat are seated in the library, one reading a book on mythical beasts, one reading a book on barnyard buddies. The horns are obscured by the equation itself, and are then revealed on the next page. Observant children will enjoy playing detective. The book can be read independently but would also be fun to share with a group. A great way to encourage outside-the-box thinking.—Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
An inventive look at addition encourages children to figure out how problems such as 1+1=3 could possibly be true. In this case, a turn of the page reveals that one unicorn plus one goat equals three horns. Fifteen addition problems, all 1+1, challenge readers to add ages, team members, seeds, insect legs, toes, wheels and wings. After the first few, readers are sure to catch on to the format, and their guessing will improve. Sexton's digital artwork gives children the clues they need to succeed, but they are still not all a piece of cake, preserving a satisfyingly challenging experience. Her whimsical illustrations combine simple shapes with plain backgrounds, making it easy for readers to count. While the trim is small, the artwork fills the spreads and the bright colors make the details pop off the pages. Good fun both on its own and as a springboard for more creative activities, it's a sort of Tomorrow's Alphabet, by George Shannon and illustrated by Donald Crews (1995), for numbers. (Picture book. 4-9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402759956
  • Publisher: Sterling
  • Publication date: 9/7/2010
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 292,722
  • Age range: 5 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.10 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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