×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

1,000 Places to See Before You Die: A Traveler's Life List
     

1,000 Places to See Before You Die: A Traveler's Life List

4.0 77
by Patricia Schultz
 

See All Formats & Editions


Introducing the Eighth Wonder of travel books, the New York Times bestseller that's been hailed by CBS-TV as one of the best books of the year and praised by Newsweek as  the "book that tells you what's beautiful, what's inspiring, what's fun and what's just unforgettable everywhere on earth."

Packed with recommendations of the world's best

Overview


Introducing the Eighth Wonder of travel books, the New York Times bestseller that's been hailed by CBS-TV as one of the best books of the year and praised by Newsweek as  the "book that tells you what's beautiful, what's inspiring, what's fun and what's just unforgettable everywhere on earth."

Packed with recommendations of the world's best places to visit, on and off the beaten path, 1,000 Places To See Before You Die is a joyous, passionate gift for travelers, an around-the-world, continent-by-continent listing of beaches, museums, monuments, islands, inns, restaurants, mountains, and more. There's Botswana's Okavango Delta, the covered souks of Aleppo, the Tuscan hills surrounding San Gimignano, Canyon de Chelly, the Hassler hotel in Rome, Ipanema Beach, the backwaters of Kerala, Oaxaca's Saturday market, the Buddhas of Borobudur, Ballybunion golf club-all the places guaranteed to give you the shivers.

The prose is gorgeous, seizing on exactly what makes each entry worthy of inclusion. And, following the romance, the nuts and bolts: addresses, phone numbers, websites, costs, and best times to visit—all updated for 2010 with the most current information.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"At last, a book that tells you what's beautiful, what's fun and what's just unforgettable—everywhere on earth."
Newsweek
Newsweek
"At last, a book that tells you what's beautiful, what's fun and what's just unforgettable—everywhere on earth."

Newsweek

Publishers Weekly
This hefty volume reminds vacationers that hot tourist spots are small percentage of what's worth seeing out there. A quick sampling: Venice's Cipriani Hotel; California's Monterey Peninsula; the Lewis and Clark Trail in Oregon; the Great Wall of China; Robert Louis Stevenson's home in Western Samoa; and the Alhambra in Andalusia, Spain. Veteran travel guide writer Schultz divides the book geographically, presenting a little less than a page on each location. Each entry lists exactly where to find the spot (e.g. Moorea is located "12 miles/19 km northwest of Tahiti; 10 minutes by air, 1 hour by boat") and when to go (e.g., if you want to check out The Complete Fly Fisher hotel in Montana, "May and Sept.-Oct. offer productive angling in a solitary setting"). This is an excellent resource for the intrepid traveler. (Sept. 23) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761104841
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2003
Pages:
992
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.69(d)

Read an Excerpt


INTRODUCTION

The Story of This Book

Is it nature or nurture that sends a person out onto the Road—that whispers in one’s ear that it’s time to take off and make for the horizon, just to see what’s out there?

The urge to travel—to open our minds and move beyond the familiar—is as old as man himself. It’s what drove the ancient Romans to visit Athens’s Acropolis and Verona’s amphitheater. It’s what sent Marco Polo off on his momentous journey east, and what moved St. Augustine of Hippo to write, “The world is a book, and those who do not travel, read only one page.” Whether we go to London for the weekend or to a place that’s utterly alien, travel changes us, sometimes superficially, sometimes profoundly. It is a classroom without walls.

I can’t speak for everyone, but I can tell you about my own wanderlust. Family legend (never proven) has it that we’re somehow related to Mark Twain, America’s great storyteller and also one of the preeminent globetrotters of his day. How then to explain my mother’s reaction when I had my own first Great Adventure?

It was the late 1950s, and Atlantic City was as exotic and unknown to me as Shangri-la—all sand and sea, hotels and boardwalk, and the intimation of greater things just beyond what I could see from the family beach blanket. I set off at the first opportunity, but after what seemed only a few precious minutes of intoxicating discovery (in fact several hours), I was snatched up by my apoplectic mother and a cadre of relieved lifeguards and brought back to the roost. This is my earliest memory: I had heard the siren call of the great, global beyond, and I had answered. I was hooked. I was four.

Fast-forward to college graduation. Campus buddies were heading straight for Wall Street apprenticeships, international banking programs, and family business obligations, but I made a beeline for the airport and my own private Grand Tour through the marvels of Italy and its neighbors. Could one make a living off la dolce vita? I was amazed when my first articles got published, but then I realized: one could. Many guidebooks and innumerable articles later, I found myself at a round table facing publisher Peter Workman and his right-hand editor, the late Sally Kovalchick, who told me about their desire to compile the world’s most enticing and intriguing treasures between two covers, and their belief that I was up to the challenge. I was on board.

When it came time to actually do it, though—to choose from the nearly bottomless grab bag of the world’s possibilities, both legendary and unsung—I realized I was in for a lengthy battle with philosophy and methodology and all the questions anyone who flips through this book is bound to ask. How did I arrive at these particular destinations and events?

Meet the Author


Patricia Schultz is the author of the runaway #1 New York Times bestsellers 1,000 Places to See Before You Die and 1,000 Places in the United States and Canada to See Before You Die. She’s also written for Frommer’s, Berlitz, and Access travel guides, as well as Condé NastTraveler, Islands, and Harper’s Bazaar. Her home base is New York City.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

1,000 Places to See Before You Die: A Traveler's Life List 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 77 reviews.
ClairePW More than 1 year ago
This book is incomplete, at least my edition is. It does not mention: South Korea, islands of Haiti, Curacao and Aruba. I've been to all but Haiti which I will be traveling soon to help at one of the tent cities. I sent for a book on Haiti and found a "5 star" hotel in Haiti.
annekemaan More than 1 year ago
it is good to find places worth seeing I just thought they would be the local gems in stead of the major tourist traps, a lot of them highly overrated and busy. I sometimes call this book the 1000 places to avoid since there is no secret in it, even for expensive traveling. but it is a good place to start, check it out, just dont rely on it ( as a belgian for example I could add about 10 places more beautifull, exclusive and worth visiting than the ones in the book, but I guess otherwise it would become the 10 000 places to see)....
Travel-Lady More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book because of it's popularity and because of my interest in travel. My husband & I own a travel agency and I thought it might provide creative suggestions for our guests. Although I don't agree with many of the inclusions on the 1000 list (mostly hotels), I do appreciate the amount of research and the difficult task of taking this vast globe and narrowing it down to 1000 places to see. What I like about the book is the organization, the amount of detail and type of information for each item, the way she handles large city must see items, and just the fascinating travels of one person. I would like to see more active/adventure type entries. Although I'm not sure I would recommend as a cover to cover read, it is a useful resource and I learned about places I was not familiar. If you want to discuss further, there is a Travel Book Club at BN in Grand Rapids tomorrow, 2/24 at 6 pm. www.cruiseholidays.com/sail
4kidmom More than 1 year ago
This book is not a novel-read. The author recommends 1000 places to see throughout one's life. The book is well-organized and allows the reader different ways to get to the same subject. Excellent gift for the person who has everything, or needs nothing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
We really like this book. A variety of places, each with a decent explanation. Everything from great coastlines and beaches, to museums and cathedrals. It is heating up our desire for travel, it provides a great goal for our travel plans! The index is great for reviewing what is in your next, or favorite travel spots. Fun to see that some of the places we have already visited are on the list, now to get out of North America and see those!
JTVJT More than 1 year ago
I GOT NOTHING BUT BLANK PAGES
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago