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1,000 Years Ago on Planet Earth
     

1,000 Years Ago on Planet Earth

by Sneed B. Collard III, Jonathan Hunt (Illustrator)
 

At the dawn of the third millennium we know more about our amazing planet than ever before. But what did the world look like one thousand years ago? This eye-opening book takes readers back a thousand years in time to discover what was happening in twelve incredibly different civilizations at the turn of the first millennium. Travel to Central America to explore

Overview

At the dawn of the third millennium we know more about our amazing planet than ever before. But what did the world look like one thousand years ago? This eye-opening book takes readers back a thousand years in time to discover what was happening in twelve incredibly different civilizations at the turn of the first millennium. Travel to Central America to explore the great pyramid at Chichen Itza, witness the acts of the bloodthirsty and adventurous Vikings in northern Europe, and learn about the fascinating innovations of the Chinese during the Song Dynasty. This fascinating flashback describes how the planet has changed over the centuries and helps readers imagine what the future may be like.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
As the third millennium A.D. approaches, kids may wonder what was happening on earth at the turn of the second. This book does a fine job of introducing that information, beginning with a list of facts (population, language, etc.) and going on to survey what was happening in various parts of the world. Each two-page spread begins "1,000 years ago in . . ." and goes on to chronicle in a bar of text what was happening in civilizations in various parts of the world. Among the areas chronicled are the Americas, Central and Southern Europe, Northern Europe, England, China, India, the Middle East, Africa, and Australia.The pictures add a solid visual dimension to the historical developments. The last page updates the fact list initially presented. Kids will see there has been tremendous progress in some ways, but not all.

August 19, 1999 Booklist, ALA

How did people live 1,000 years ago? Collard (Animal Dads, 1997, etc.) presents a different region or civilization on each spread, introducing the Anasazi and Mississippian of North America, Mayan of Central America, Chimu of Peru, Vikings of Northern Europe, Muslims of the Middle East, Shona of West Africa, the Chola dynasty of India, Song dynasty of China, and the Aborigines of Australia.... This is a good introduction that will encourage more exploration.

Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
Each two-page spread of this oversize illustrated book peers into life a millennium ago on a different part of the globe. "1,000 Years Ago in North America" tells about the Anasazi Indians and the prosperous civilization at Chaco Canyon. "1,000 Years Ago in Northern Europe" describes the intrepid Vikings and their quests for land and wealth. Those are two of the twelve glimpses this book provides into cultures around the world at the last turn of a millennium. This handsome, informative book is just perfect for millennium readers who enjoy reflecting on where we are and where we've been. Those readers who have already tired of millennium-this and millennium-that will delight in the refreshing perspective this book presents of historical milestones of civilization and advanced culture.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4 As a millennium ends, it's only natural to be curious about its beginning. Here, Collard aims to pique that curiosity, not with a catalog of specific events, but by profiling 12 world cultures circa A.D. 1000. Each one gets a spread that combines a column of general information with a large painted scene, generally of earnest-looking people at work or play in a distinctive setting. Like the text, Hunt's illustrations are not crowded with details but those he does choose to include are carefully, clearly depicted. Though the selection of stopovers has a Eurocentric slant, young armchair tourists will also get glimpses of South America's Chimu people, early Shona culture in Africa, southern India under the Chola Dynasty, and North America's Mississippian civilization, among others. Capped by short lists of books and Web sites, this quick, sweeping survey suggests some of the ways life has and has not changed in the last 10 centuries. John Peters, New York Public Library Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
How did people live 1,000 years ago? Collard (Animal Dads, 1997, etc.) presents a different region or civilization on each spread, introducing the Anasazi and Mississippian of North America, Mayan of Central America, Chimu of Peru, Vikings of Northern Europe, Muslims of the Middle East, Shona of West Africa, the Chola dynasty of India, Song dynasty of China, and the Aborigines of Australia. For most civilizations, the author selects high points, but Central and Southern Europe is a place where "culture and civilization were floundering," while the spread on Northern Europe provides little information on how people lived, stressing instead that the Vikings raided "defenseless towns and villages across Europe and Asia" where they "slaughtered their enemies, ransomed rulers, and seized slaves, silver, and other valuables." For the most part, however, Collard captures the essence of a culture in a few brief paragraphs. Hunt attempts to provide additional clues to the culture, showing clothing, artifacts and the architecture, but the facial expressions are often fierce, or at least somber, and the emphasis on blood in the Aborigine and Northern European spreads taps into stereotypes. Nevertheless, this is a good introduction that will encourage more exploration. (map, further reading) (Picture book/nonfiction. 9-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395908662
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/28/1999
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.40(w) x 11.44(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Sneed B. Collard III has written more than fifty books for young people. In 2006, he received the Washington Post–Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award for his body of work. He lives with his family in Montana.To learn more about Sneed B. Collard III, visit www.sneedbcollardiii.com.

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