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10,000 Days
     

10,000 Days

4.3 55
by Tool
 
It's only been five years since prog-metal kingpins Tool last launched a studio salvo, but a few lifetimes of experience seem to have gone into its creation. 10,000 Days marks something of a maturation, and while it's not exactly the emergence of a kinder, gentler band, there's considerably less misanthropy and angst coursing through the disc's grooves. Heck,

Overview

It's only been five years since prog-metal kingpins Tool last launched a studio salvo, but a few lifetimes of experience seem to have gone into its creation. 10,000 Days marks something of a maturation, and while it's not exactly the emergence of a kinder, gentler band, there's considerably less misanthropy and angst coursing through the disc's grooves. Heck, "Vicarious," with its layers of harmonies and impeccably infectious rhythms, is practically radio friendly -- the closest Tool has ever come to delivering outright accessibility. Fans of the band's dense thickets of sound needn't fret, however: Most of 10,000 Days is every bit as intense and demanding as folks have come to expect, with frontman Maynard James Keenan and company really throwing down the gauntlet on the two-part, 17-minute suite "Wings for Marie/10,000 Days." With its echoes of "Echoes" -- the Pink Floyd epic, that is -- that two-fer builds from space-rock ether to fists-of-fury flailing on the strength of inexorably throbbing guitar riffage. The keyboard-laced "Rosetta Stone" -- which clocks in at a mere 11 eleven minutes -- has a similarly lava-like progression, oozing forward menacingly much like the title track from Lateralus. On the other hand, tracks like the primal "Lipan Conjuring" -- a tune that's redolent of fireside rituals -- prove that the band still knows how to go for the jugular without warning. Uncompromising and often draining, 10,000 Days offers the kind of workout the folks at Bally's Fitness never imagined -- a regimen sure to twist both the spine and the brain.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Rob Theakston
In an age where major labels dictate that new releases from bands appear on record store shelves every 18 months or so, rare is the artist given freedom and ability to reflect and stretch out to explore creative evolution and release music as an artist, rather than the prepackaged predictability of an entertainer. Thankfully, Tool has somehow managed to circumvent these rituals, releasing a record every four to five years as they so feel the need. This ability to patiently craft their musical direction has paid off for not only the band, but for listeners, as they've been able to expand their musical vocabulary from album to album with great precision, all the while remaining true to the foundations that built such a loyal, if not cult-like, following. But with this absence comes changes to the popular music landscape, as new bands and sounds (as well as a new generation of heavy metal fans to entertain) replace and stimulate the charts. Namely: a lot can happen in five years, especially with a fickle rock audience that is overinundated with constant new bands' songs. The group defied expectations (and even got radio airplay) with Lateralus, but would fans stick with them during the hiatus? There were moments when Maynard James Keenan would emerge courtesy of A Perfect Circle, and there were also several stunning video DVDs to pacify while 10,000 Days was being written, along with cryptic messages via their website, but that was about it. Thankfully, 10,000 Days was worth the labor pains and wait to deliver. It's not only a step forward for the band, but a re-embracing of the epic-length rock songs found at the roots of early heavy metal. The album starts out with "Vicarious," which features some of Maynard's most straightforward lyrics since Ænema's "Hooker with a Penis." Essentially a biting commentary on reality television, information stimulus overload, and living through others' experiences, it's only a brief glimpse of what's to come, as 10,000 Days also offers some of Keenan's most confessional lyrics. The 17-minute epic "Wings for Marie/10,000 Days" is an ode to his mother, who passed away during the band's hiatus after dealing with paralysis from a stroke for 27 years. In a way, it's voyeuristic to listen to someone working out family issues on disc, but Keenan does it in a way that's sensitive and honest without ever treading the careful line between melodrama and sincerity. Most of the songs are a bit long in the tooth when compared to most metal songs these days, but then again, Tool isn't exactly just another band, either. With most songs clocking in over six minutes, the exercises in songwriting wouldn't work as well with any other band. But when you have such high-caliber musicianship as Danny Carey and Adam Jones anchoring drums and guitar, respectively, it's hard to make a wrong turn. The anger that served as fuel for some of their greatest works has been replaced with calmer and more introspective moments as they patiently work out rhythm and melodic passages from one theme to the next. That's not to say the anger isn't still there; it does check in from song to song, but like most of Tool's fan base that has stuck with them through their first recordings, the group has evolved beyond that stage and has moved on to new concepts to explore. So depending upon which Tool you are looking for, you're either going to love or hate 10,000 Days. If it's the hard-driving band with an intellectually driven existential anger and fits of Hot Topic-laden angst, they've fled for other pastures (probably to Arizona Bay). But if you're looking for the Tool whose passion and introspection is complemented by intense emotion, brutal honesty, and musical maturity, you'll be hard-pressed to find a better metal album in 2006.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/02/2006
Label:
Volcano
UPC:
0828768199121
catalogNumber:
81991
Rank:
375

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10,000 Days 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 55 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
tool does it again with this album. although afew songs sound alot like older stuff of theirs, i still like it and there are not many other bands that can keep people waiting 5+ years between cds.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The more you listen to this album, the more you'll like it. I'm glad they don't make every new song sound like an Aenema song... they are exploring musically, and most of it comes out great. Having seen them live already this year, it really gave a chance to let the music sink in. Rosetta Stoned, Right in Two, 10,000 days, The Pot, and Vicarious are easily the best on the album.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i ve listened to this album only once, but thats all i need, the other tool recordings were instant classics, if they were'nt right away, there would be elements that would draw me back to them, good sound great for people who are just getting into progressive rock,but my suggestion would be wait another 10,000 days and hope tool gets it right again ( Danny mentioned rather bizzarly about the new direction of a more angrier band making reference to there president being the cause of there frustrations) this is no political album by any stretchs of the imagination nor is it angrier in fact this would be there slowest to date i dont hear any memorable lines being screamed with the feriocity of certain opiate or animea tracks
Guest More than 1 year ago
Most people who know tool from their radio friendly songs usually are critical of this album. They are looking for something more like A Perfect Cirle, which this is not this is TOOL. Tool is the supreme musicianship of Keenan and the rest trying to release something that is a modern work of art, whether it's radio friendly or not. This magical piece of art is intended to be listened to thru and thru not for those who just want to skip from one new single to the next. This album, like Lateralus, is an experience that is definitely worth 15 bucks! These guys are geniuses, and that is what separates this album for the others that is why most fans of the 4 minute songs of A Perfect Circle don't get it. So, make your choice based on that. Which one are you?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Whereas Tool's AENIMA was a gritty, raw, industrial masterpiece of it's time, Tool's 10,000 DAYS is an almost entirely underwhelming album in comparison, and a merely mediocre one on it's own terms. In a sense, it is simply a reminder of how much of a shadow of their former selves Tool have become. Initially, the album seems somewhat promising as it starts off with a polished, almost "twinkling" combination of guitar and bass, symmetrically harmonizing, predictably foreshadowing an explosion of sound soon to come. Which it does. Keenan's vocals begin to atmospherically fade into the thumping combination of guitar, bass, and Danny Carey's - as usual - excellent drumming, almost humming "I own the TV, 'cause tragedy thrills me...". This effective sound-scape is good enough for a while, until you begin to realize how repetitive the song truly is. For Tool, it is surprisingly formulaic. Generic, even. Passage, chorus, passage, chorus, bridge, passage, chorus, passage, bridge... wash, rinse, repeat. For over five minutes. Considering this is Tool, who with AENIMA mastered finishing their songs off at the "just right" length, this is especially distressing. And sadly, almost the entire album follows this same pattern. The only exceptions here are "Wings for Marie", pt. 1 and 2, atmospherically lulling melodies where Maynard sings mournfully: "It's time for us to let you go", as well as "Right in Two". But as for the rest of the album - it feels like Tool are trying to fill up as much possible space on one disc as they can. Which is horrifying for a band that spoke so strongly of anti-conformist sentiments. For now, we'll have to continue listening to everything before 10,000 DAYS, and hope that Tool will at some point return to form.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are a hardcore TOOL fan you'll love it. It is not their best album. However they are not going to write the same songs. They are going to progress to something different. Also it is going to be hard to surpass some of their better albums like Aneima or Lateralus. Everyone is talking bad about TOOL but if you are a fan and you like TOOL don't listen to them.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Once again Tool surpasss today's standards of progressive music...This album is an amazing work of art and I highly recommend it to anyone. Do yourself a big favor and check it out!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yeah people wanna compare this one to Aenima and so forth- to me this is an awesome album that grows on me more every time I play it and stands up easily to Tool's previous records. The sound is incredible, the influence of King Crimson makes for much more interesting and exciting bass-drums-guitar parts, interlocking and flowing. The bass really shines on this album, I've always loved it that Tool were never a guitar hero band where every song has to have a fast guitar solo, each intrument is interesting in the way the four pieces fit together and that creates the excitement. Also the guitar often steps back to let the bass shine out- which being a bass player I appreciate. A lot of people who want to like the album right away expexting it to be "as good" as Aenima should give the album more time and open up to the music. Being a musician I know what it takes to try and compose new tunes and these guys deliver. The tunes sound awesome live also. Tool is evolving and I hope they got over all the legal hassles and can put a new cd out sooner than 5 yrs :)
Guest More than 1 year ago
To me, this album is best understood from the career perspective. With their last album, Lateralus, Tool completed their "concept metal to transcendental experimentation" transformation. Five years later Tool emerges with a "what we learned as a band" album, combining the fed up and heavy with the thoughtful and moving. With these elements, the band sounds tighter and more creative than ever.
SoCalBookReader More than 1 year ago
I think this is a common comment on Tool CDs -- there are three really great tracks, and the rest I could take or leave (or skip).
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the general scheme of the music business, at least these days, I would call this album outstanding. With that said, I feel it is only right to judge this album not by Tool's previous albums, but by other new releases of the past year or so. This meaning, 10,000 days isn't my favorite Tool release, but I won't hold that against it. I agree with previous reviewers. The album is so much more rewarding when listened to in it's entirety. I made the mistake of hearing half of the songs individually without giving it a proper listen, but then I heard it from start to finish and I must say that nothing can bring down a band as high caliber as Tool.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have just recently began listening to Tool, but I fell in love immediatley. I only have this and AENIMA, both incredible. All of the songs on this album can work as just the song or as listening through the whole thing. I, personally, prefer listening to the whole album. If you like Tool, buy it. If youy don't...buy it anyway.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been listening to Tool for years, and this is probably my favorite album by them. Everything they put out is nothing short of amazing, and this is no exception. While songs are good on their own for the most part, the listening experience is so much more rewarding listening to all the way through. Tracks segue effortlessly into eachother, or pave the way for the next, either instrumentally, or in theme, or both. Things kick off with Vicarious, which is about our obsession with death and tragedy in the media. Vicarious ends and Jambi immediately follows, opening with a similiar rhythmic attack and has an awesome drum n bass part in which the guitarist Adam Jones uses a talkbox to top it off. The Wings for Marie/10,000 Days suite tone things down for a ode to Maynard's deceased mother only to rise back up again while demanding her well earned angel wings at heaven's gate. "While played live, these songs are accompanied by a fantastic laser show worthy of Pink Floyd". The Pot is the second single off the album to get radio play "the first being Vicarious", and with good reason. Its infectious bassline and impeccable rhythm of the words as well ""Liar, lawyer, mirror for ya what's the difference?!"", this is a cool tune. The drug theme carries on to the next few songs with Lipan Conjuring, a sort of Native American ritual kind of song. It continues with Lost Keys "Blame Hofmann", which is a kind of skit about a john doe patient who is all tripped out and dropped off at a hospital, and when the doctor asks him what's wrong, he replies in Rosetta Stoned, "Alrighty then, picture this if you will" and goes on a hard to decipher rambling of a madman about UFOs and ETs, and being made the "chosen one" to deliver a message to mankind but he forgot his pen, and by the end of the track he's strapped down at the hospital, brain dead, and still desperately trying to remember but by then it's too late. Intension and Right in Two are kind of a pair as well, the latter being about angels shaking their heads at the human race's petty bickering and war. Vigniti Tres "23" ends the album.
Guest More than 1 year ago
what s stinker of a album. one wonders why would release an album the same day as the all mighty pearl jam. who manages them? geez.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hints of angst are present in this, their most emotionally driven album to date. Of course, I could just be saying that since I will be 10,000 days old on June 13th. Anyone who has struggled with life for a long period of time will be brought to tears in wings pt 2 the first few times they really listen to it. Outstanding album that is marginally less powerful that Lateralus.
DEMONTHE7TH More than 1 year ago
This is definitely more of a perfect circle type Tool cd. It definitely catches you with it's hooks and soothing, spine tingling melodies. The song 10,000 Days definitely sums up how amazing Tool can put together a song that starts from very little. It kind of reminds me of the rain for some reason. Anyways, I cannot wait till they put out a new cd. I think some people were offended that they decided to go a little more melodic instead of keeping it heavy, but there are definitely some heavy songs on here for the metal freaks too such as Vicarious and a few others. I still like Lateralus just a tad more, but if you could combine this cd and Lateralus you would have one mega hit!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Love it... another masterpiece by one of the most underrated bands. The only bad thing is that I have to wait another 5 years for their next release.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are maybe ten or fifteen albums in music history that I would give 5 stars to. This is definitely one of them. As a Tool fan I can say that if you liked even one of the previous Tool Albums then you will at least enjoy this one. There are pieces of Tool here that were lying around throughout Opiate, Undertow, Aenima and Lateralus. My favorite Tool album to date was Lateralus, and there is plenty of that sound here. After a few more listens I'm fairly confident I'll have a New Favorite Tool Album (Which also means Favorite Overall Album). Was very nervous about this one, after so many years in waiting, but not only did it not disappoint. . . it blew my expectations out of the water. Even if you've never heard Tool Before: BUY IT!!!! You won't be sorry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tool has been my favorite band for many years now. Aenima, Lateralus, Salival, Undertow, and Opiate have all been in constant rotation for me. 10,000 Days is lacking the same magic those wonderful albums all had. The amount of thought put into this album isn't consistent with what I would have expected after a five year hiatus. Given the fact that there are so few actual songs here, it makes for a rather disappointing album overall. The track 10,000 Days stands out as pretty good, as does Jambi, Vicarious is quickly becoming the new Schism (it was obviously written to be a single), and The Pot and Rosetta Stoned are decent. Overall 3 stars, a rather poor effort from a very outstanding group.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An excellent, passionate CD. I always felt that the band was expressing feelings straight from their heart, and it's wonderful to witness their growth over the years. Moreover, the CD case is interesting, which is why TOOL is a pleasure for both the auditory and visual senses.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are a few really great songs and a few that are good. A lot are just all right though. Tool may not last if they keep coming up with CDs like this one. Maynard already destroyed the fan base for A Perfect Circle by allowing Billy to sing. Hopefully, Tool's next CD is a lot better than this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i've been a Tool fan since i was 11 when Lateralus came out and I was hooked since then. When 10,000 days came out, it was like any other Tool album I purchased, long and boring in most parts. But with a Tool album you have to listin more than 3 times to get the full blown creativity of what Maynard says. The album shows the agression Tool is known for in "Vicarious" and "The Pot." Where as In contradiction to that they show a more softer side in "Wings for Marie/10,000 Days" The Album is a cornucopia of different emotions that if you listin closely you'll find. My personal favorite is "Right in Two." It shows an Angels perspective of God's creation and gift of man and how they squander their gifts. Shows Maynards religious evolution and how thought provoking his lyrics can be. Vicarious is great since it's a cold hard slap to the face of some people who live their lives through TV reality shows plus its a great radio song, barely eclipsing the 7 minute mark it never looses its agression. OVerall this is my third favorite Tool CD but it's behind Aneima and Lateralus so surpassing those two albums would be a challenging feat. A lot different from both Aneima and Lateralus but great none the less. If you have 79 minutes to blow one day i suggest throwing it in your car cd player and just listin. It's how you get into Tool albums. On a final note, one of the best CD's of 2006 bar none