1001 Ways to Reward Employees

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Overview

The vice president of a leading management-training and consulting company has delved extensively into the issue of employee rewards and put together an idea-filled reference to making the person/achievement/reward equation work.

Whether you manage a department, oversee a division, lead a company -- or run a family business with just one employee -- there's an essential principle to follow that's too often overlooked: What most motivates the ...

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Overview

The vice president of a leading management-training and consulting company has delved extensively into the issue of employee rewards and put together an idea-filled reference to making the person/achievement/reward equation work.

Whether you manage a department, oversee a division, lead a company -- or run a family business with just one employee -- there's an essential principle to follow that's too often overlooked: What most motivates the people who work for you is recognition.

A chock-full guide to rewards of every conceivable type for every conceivable situation, 1001 Ways to Reward Employees polls the whole of the American business community, finding innovative ideas in every corner. From the spontaneous gesture of praise to formal company-wide programs, it presents hundreds of ways to say thank you to the people who truly deserve it.


This booklet should be required reading for managers. The author presents a compelling case for recognition and positive reinforcement in management practice. And for some old-time micro-managers, he shows that employee coercion is no longer an option. This book examines ways, means and methods used by corporations to recognize employees. It also discusses a common failing; "...it is a rare manager who systematically makes the effort simply to thank employees for a job well done, let alone to do something more innovative to recognize accomplishments." Author Bob Nelson, presents case histories, strategies and innovative ideas used by corporations to reward employees. He discusses these case histories and strategies from three perspectives: informal rewards, rewards for specific achievements and activities, and formal rewards. The informal awards are no cost or low cost rewards such as public recognition, time off or merchandise awards. The rewards for specific achievement include outstanding employee awards, sales goals or customer service awards. Formal awards may include field trips, social events, self-development or advancement. The author also has compiled a plethora of information to help you reward employee initiative and behavior.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

This book should be required reading for managers. The author presents a compelling case for recognition and positive reinforcement in management practice. And for some old-time micro-managers, he shows that employee coercion is no longer an option. This book examines ways, means and methods used by corporations to recognize employees. It also discusses a common failing; "...it is a rare manager who systematically makes the effort simply to thank employees for a job well done, let alone to do something more innovative to recognize accomplishments."

Author Bob Nelson presents case histories, strategies and innovative ideas used by corporations to reward employees. He discusses these case histories and strategies from three perspectives: informal rewards, rewards for specific achievements and activities, and formal rewards. The informal awards are no cost or low cost rewards such as public recognition, time off or merchandise awards. The rewards for specific achievement include outstanding employee awards, sales goals or customer service awards. Formal awards may include field trips, social events, self-development or advancement. The author also has compiled a plethora of information to help you reward employee initiative and behavior.

The New York Times
[Helps managers] take certain rewards and mold them into new management styles at their companies.
The Wall Street Journal
Better than money: Praise and personal gestures motivate workers. Things that don't cost money are ironically the most effective.
Training magazine
“The most interesting and inventive business book on the market today . . .a publishing phenomenon.”
Training magazine
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Welcome to Bob’s World: A place of above-average managers and workers, all committed to personal excellence, good will and, of course, company profits. [This book] details how a little praise goes a long way.”
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“There’s a difference between having someone show up for work and bringing out the best thinking and initiative in each person. To do that requires treating employees more as partners, not as subordinates. Being nice isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s also the economical thing to do.”
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781559352659
  • Publisher: Soundelux
  • Publication date: 1/1/1998
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: 2 Cassettes
  • Product dimensions: 4.15 (w) x 6.74 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author


Bob Nelson is a management specialist whose books include Empowering Employees Through Delegation and We've Got to Start Meeting Like This: A Guide to Successful Business Meeting Management.
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Read an Excerpt


Part I: Informal Rewards

...Communication

Numerous motivational studies show that employees typically place a high value on getting information about their job, their performance and how the company is doing. When that communication is personal and timely, it is all the more highly valued.

In a recent study, positive written communication was found to be very important in motivating employees; however, this technique was used by only 24 percent of managers. A survey by Professional Secretaries International revealed that as many as 30 percent of professional secretaries would prefer a simple letter of appreciation from their managers -- and that a bouquet or a lunch was unnecessary. Only 7 percent of respondents reported having ever received such a letter.



Performance management consultant Janis Allen advocates creating positive gossip -- spreading positive comments about others. "When someone says something good about another person and I tell that person about it," Allen says, "she seems to get more reinforcement value from it than if she had received the compliment firsthand."


"The greatest motivational act one person can do for another is to listen." --Roy E. Moody, President, Roy Moody and Associates


At American General Life in Nashville, a dozen employees are selected at random each month to meet the president and discuss matters of corporate concern.


"The leader needs to be in touch with the employees and to communicate with them on a daily basis." --Donald Petersen, President and CEO, Ford Motor Company


Nissan Motor Manufacturing Corporation U.S.A., in Smyrna, TN, sponsors family orientation programs for new employees that include refreshments and a slide show about the company. Every family is given a set of drinking glasses with "Nissan" printed on them. The day before a new employee comes to work, several people call to welcome him or her to the company.


At Blanchard Training and Development in Escondido, CA, letters of praise from customers (and other employees) are reprinted in the company publication. First Chicago, a bank holding company, also does this, and gives each employee who receives such a letter two round-trip tickets, a Winning Spirit pin and a certificate signed by the president. First Chicago recognizes four to a dozen employees each month. At Collins & Aikman, a carpet manufacturer in Dalton, GA, the company recognizes and lists the achievements of employees' children in its newsletter.


Each morning at Precision Metalcraft in Winnipeg, Manitoba, management holds "huddles" to pass out the day's work assignments. The huddles end in a cheer as people disperse to get to work. To show they were all on the same team, Sheldon Bowles, chairman-of the company, moved executives to the shop floor and used their offices to store the company's finished products.


  • Plan to meet for informal chats with each of your employees at least once a week, finding out what aspects of their jobs they are focused on and how you can better assist them, and generally answering whatever questions they have about the department or company.
  • When you hear a positive remark about an individual, repeat it to that person as soon as possible. Seek the person out if necessary. If you can't meet, leave an electronic mail or voice mail message.
  • Use charts or posters to show how well an employee or group is performing.



"No matter what business you're in, everyone in the organization needs to know why. " --Frances Hesselbein, President, The Drucker Foundation


A Case Study in Corporate Communication

In his first two months as general manager of the new copy products group of Eastman Kodak in Rochester, NY, Chuck Trowbridge met with nearly every key person in his group, as well as with people elsewhere at Kodak who could be important to the copier business. Trowbridge set up dozens of vehicles to emphasize the new direction: weekly meetings with his own twelve direct reports; monthly "copy product forums" in which he met with groups consisting of a different employee from each of his departments; quarterly meetings with all 100 of his supervisors to discuss recent improvements and new projects; and quarterly State of the Department meetings, in which his managers met with everybody in their own departments.

Once a month, Bob Crandall, one of Trowbridge's direct reports and head of the engineering and manufacturing organization, and all those who reported to him also met with eighty to a hundred people from some area of Trowbridge's organization to discuss topics of their choice. Trowbridge and his managers met with the top management of their biggest supplier over lunch every Thursday. More recently, Trowbridge has created a format called "business meetings": His managers meet with twelve to twenty people to discuss a specific topic, such as inventory or master scheduling. The goal is to get all of his 1,500 employees into at least one of these focused business meetings each year.

Trowbridge and Crandall also enlisted written communication in their cause. A four- to eight-page "Copy Products Journal" was sent to employees once a month. A program called Dialogue Letters gave employees the opportunity to ask questions anonymously of Crandall and his top managers, with a guaranteed reply.

The most visible and powerful form of written communication was the charts. In a main hallway near the cafeteria, huge charts vividly reported the quality, cost and delivery results for each product, measured against difficult targets. A hundred smaller versions of these charts were scattered throughout the manufacturing area , reporting quality levels and costs for specific work groups.

Results of this intensive alignment process appeared within six months and remained evident more than a year later. These successes helped gain support for the new direction. In a four-year period, quality on one of the main product lines increased nearly 100 times. Defects per unit fell from 30 to 0.3. Over a three-year period, costs on another product line decreased nearly 24 percent. Deliveries on schedule increased from 82 percent to 95 percent in two years. Inventory levels dropped by more than 50 percent in four years, even though the volume of products increased. Productivity, measured in units per manufacturing employee, more than doubled in three years.

...

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Table of Contents


Foreword by Ken Blanchard ..... ix
Preface ..... xi
Introduction ..... xv
Part I: Informal Rewards ..... 1
No-Cost Recognition ..... 3
Low-Cost Rewards ..... 9
Recognition Activities ..... 19
Public Recognition/Social Rewards ..... 25
Communication ..... 30
Time Off ..... 42
Cash/Cash Substitutes/Gift Certificates ..... 47
Merchandise/Apparel/Food ..... 58
Recognition Items/Trophies/Plaques ..... 67
Fun/Celebrations ..... 73
Part II: Awards for Specific Achievements and Activities ..... 87
Outstanding Employee Awards ..... 89
Productivity/Production/Quality Awards ..... 97
Employee Suggestion Awards ..... 104
Customer Service Awards ..... 113
Sales Goal Awards ..... 127
Group/Team Awards ..... 142
Attendance and Safety Awards ..... 152
Part III: Formal Rewards ..... 159
Multi-Level Reward Programs/Point Systems ..... 161
Contests ..... 173
Field Trips/Special Events/Travel ..... 181
Education/Personal Growth/Self Development ..... 191
Advancement/Responsibility/Visibility ..... 197
Stock/Ownership ..... 200
Employee/Company Anniversaries ..... 205
Benefits/Health/Fitness ..... 212
Charity/Social Responsibility ..... 223
Appendixes
I. Where to Get Specialty Reward Items ..... 227
II. Companies That Arrange Unusual Reward Activities ..... 237
III. Incentive Travel Coordinators ..... 243
IV. Motivational and Incentive Companies and Associations ..... 255
V. Featured Companies ..... 259
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Reward yourself- buy this book.

    This book is great and works under the premise that you get the best effort out of people, not by lighting a fire under them, but by building a fire within them. <BR/><BR/>In short, its simply a collection of ways to reward employees for doing a good job. It is divided into 6 sections (day to day rewards, intangible rewards, tangible rewards..) so there's definitely a boatload of reward ideas to fit just about any work situation. Examples from companies across the United States make this a fun read as well. Also good for any HR department- The Sixty-Second Motivator.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2005

    Not really 1001 Ways to Reward Employees

    Many of the ideas gathered in the book are repetitive so that there are many examples of the same reward idea. A lot of the ideas are great for organizations who provide a product or a service they can give employees as rewards, but in health care, that is not possible. For non-profit organizations, a lot of these ideas are not applicable, also.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2006

    Reward yourself- buy this book.

    This book is great and works under the premise that you get the best effort out of people not by lighting a fire under them, but by building a fire within them. In short, its simply a collection of ways to reward employees for doing a good job. Its divided into 6 sections (day to day rewards, intangible rewards, tangible rewards..) so there's definitely a boatload of reward ideas to fit just about any work situation. Examples from companies across the United States make it a fun read as well.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2000

    Tired and stale

    Here we go again. I read this book and can say that I picked up a few good ideas, but certainly not 1001 new ideas. It may be useful to someone who is clueless, but, gosh, these things are common sense and have been kicked around for years. Save your money.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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