1,001 Ways to Reward Employees

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"You get the best effort from others not by lighting a fire beneath them, but by building a fire within them." So sums up Bob Nelson about the philosophy of motivation that makes 1001 Ways to Reward Employees the million-copy bestseller that is indispensable for business. Now completely revised and updated, with hundreds of new, real-world examples, 1001 Ways to Reward Employees is a chock-full guide to rewards of every conceivable type for ...
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Overview


"You get the best effort from others not by lighting a fire beneath them, but by building a fire within them." So sums up Bob Nelson about the philosophy of motivation that makes 1001 Ways to Reward Employees the million-copy bestseller that is indispensable for business. Now completely revised and updated, with hundreds of new, real-world examples, 1001 Ways to Reward Employees is a chock-full guide to rewards of every conceivable type for every conceivable situation.


This booklet should be required reading for managers. The author presents a compelling case for recognition and positive reinforcement in management practice. And for some old-time micro-managers, he shows that employee coercion is no longer an option. This book examines ways, means and methods used by corporations to recognize employees. It also discusses a common failing; "...it is a rare manager who systematically makes the effort simply to thank employees for a job well done, let alone to do something more innovative to recognize accomplishments." Author Bob Nelson, presents case histories, strategies and innovative ideas used by corporations to reward employees. He discusses these case histories and strategies from three perspectives: informal rewards, rewards for specific achievements and activities, and formal rewards. The informal awards are no cost or low cost rewards such as public recognition, time off or merchandise awards. The rewards for specific achievement include outstanding employee awards, sales goals or customer service awards. Formal awards may include field trips, social events, self-development or advancement. The author also has compiled a plethora of information to help you reward employee initiative and behavior.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

This book should be required reading for managers. The author presents a compelling case for recognition and positive reinforcement in management practice. And for some old-time micro-managers, he shows that employee coercion is no longer an option. This book examines ways, means and methods used by corporations to recognize employees. It also discusses a common failing; "...it is a rare manager who systematically makes the effort simply to thank employees for a job well done, let alone to do something more innovative to recognize accomplishments."

Author Bob Nelson presents case histories, strategies and innovative ideas used by corporations to reward employees. He discusses these case histories and strategies from three perspectives: informal rewards, rewards for specific achievements and activities, and formal rewards. The informal awards are no cost or low cost rewards such as public recognition, time off or merchandise awards. The rewards for specific achievement include outstanding employee awards, sales goals or customer service awards. Formal awards may include field trips, social events, self-development or advancement. The author also has compiled a plethora of information to help you reward employee initiative and behavior.

Philadelphia Inquirer
“Welcome to Bob’s World: A place of above-average managers and workers, all committed to personal excellence, good will and, of course, company profits. [This book] details how a little praise goes a long way.”
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“There’s a difference between having someone show up for work and bringing out the best thinking and initiative in each person. To do that requires treating employees more as partners, not as subordinates. Being nice isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s also the economical thing to do.”
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
Training magazine
“The most interesting and inventive business book on the market today . . .a publishing phenomenon.”
Training magazine
The New York Times
[Helps managers] take certain rewards and mold them into new management styles at their companies.
The Wall Street Journal
Better than money: Praise and personal gestures motivate workers. Things that don't cost money are ironically the most effective.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781563053399
  • Publisher: Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/1/1994
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 302
  • Product dimensions: 6.02 (w) x 7.96 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author


Bob Nelson, Ph.D., is president of Nelson Motivation, Inc., a founding board member of the National Association for Employee Recognition (NAER), and a bestselling author whose books on management and motivation have sold over 3 million copies and been translated into over 25 languages. Dr. Nelson lives and works in San Diego, California.

KEN BLANCHARD is the author or coauthor of more than 30 books including the phenomenal best-seller The One Minute Manager (more than 10 million copies sold). His ideas and teachings have had a tremendous impact on the day-to-day management of countless people and companies.

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Read an Excerpt


DAY-TO-DAY RECOGNITION
In my doctoral research on why managers use or don’t use recognition with their employees, I found the top variable distinguishing those managers who use recognition was that they felt it was their responsibility—not corporate’s or human resources’—to create the motivational environment for their people. They truly believed that recognizing their deserving employees played an integral part in how those workers felt about their jobs.

This finding coincides with what my research shows are the most important ways that employees prefer to be recognized when they do good work—that is, simple day-to-day behaviors that any manager can express with their employees, the most important of which is praise. The best praise is done soon, specifically, sincerely, personally, positively, and proactively. In a matter of seconds, a simple praise conveys, “I saw what you did, I appreciate it, here’s why it’s important, and here’s how it makes me feel”—a lot of punch in a small package!

Four out of the top ten categories of motivators reported by employees in my research are forms of praise, and these categories make up the four chapters in Part I: personal praise, written praise, electronic praise, and public praise. Now, you might say, “Are these really different types of praise? Don’t they all have the same effect?” This was my initial thought, too, but I learned that these types of praise are in fact distinct from one another. Praising someone in person means something different to that person than writing him or her a note, and these forms of praise are both different from praising the person in public. To get the maximum impact out of this simple behavior, vary the forms you use, and use them all frequently.

Research by Dr. Gerald Graham of Wichita State University supports these observations. In multiple studies, he found that employees preferred personalized, instant recognition from their direct supervisors more than any other kind of motivation. In fact, in another survey of American workers, 63 percent of the respondents ranked “a pat on the back” as a meaningful incentive.

In Graham’s studies, employees perceived that manager-initiated rewards for performance were done least often, and that company-initiated rewards for presence (that is, rewards based simply on being in the organization) occurred most often. Dr. Graham concluded, “It appears that the techniques that have the greatest motivational impact are practiced the least, even though they are easier and less expensive to use.” Graham’s study determined the top five motivating techniques reported by employees to be:

1. The manager personally congratulates employees who do a good job.
2. The manager writes personal notes about good performance.
3. The organization uses performance as the basis for promotion.
4. The manager publicly recognizes employees for good performance.
5. The manager holds morale-building meetings to celebrate success.

Ideally, you should vary the ways you recognize your staff while still trying to do things on a day-to-day basis. For example, Robin Horder-Koop, manager of programs and services at Amway Corporation, the distributor of house and personal-care products and other goods in Ada, MI, uses these inexpensive ways to recognize the 200 people who work for her on a day-to-day basis:

  • On days when some workloads are light, the department’s employees help out workers in other departments. After accumulating eight hours of such work, employees get a thank-you note from Horder-Koop. Additional time earns a luncheon with company officials in the executive dining room.
  • All workers are recognized on a rotating basis. Each month, photos of different employees are displayed on a bulletin board along with comments from their coworkers about why they are good colleagues.
  • Horder-Koop sends thank-you notes to employees’ homes when they do outstanding work. When someone works a lot of overtime or travels extensively, she sends a note to the family thanking them for their support.
  • At corporate meetings, employees play games such as Win, Lose, or Draw and The Price Is Right, using questions about the company’s products. Winners get prizes such as tote bags and T-shirts.
Other inexpensive ideas Horder-Koop uses to recognize employees include giving flowers to employees who are commended in customers’ letters, having supervisors park employees’ cars one day a month, and designating days when workers can come in late or wear casual clothes to the office.

According to author and management consultant Rosabeth Moss Kanter, “Recognition—saying thank you in public and perhaps giving a tangible gift along with the words—has multiple functions beyond simple human courtesy. To the employee, recognition signifies that someone noticed and someone cares. To the rest of the organization, recognition creates role models—heroes—and communicates the standards, saying: ‘These are the kinds of things that constitute great performance around here.’” Following are some guidelines Kanter offers for successfully recognizing employees:

Principle 1: Emphasize success rather than failure. You tend to miss the positives if you are busily searching for the negatives.

Principle 2: Deliver recognition and reward in an open and publicized way. If not made public, recognition loses much of its impact and much of the purpose for which it is provided.

Principle 3: Deliver recognition in a personal and honest manner. Avoid providing recognition that is too “slick” or overproduced.

Principle 4: Tailor your recognition and reward to the unique needs of the people involved. Having many recognition and reward options will enable management to acknowledge accomplishment in ways appropriate to the particulars of a given situation.

Principle 5: Timing is crucial. Recognize contribution throughout a project. Reward contribution close to the time an achievement is realized. Time delays weaken the impact of most rewards.

Principle 6: Strive for a clear, unambiguous, and well-communicated connection between accomplishments and rewards. Be sure people understand why they receive awards and the criteria used to determine awards.

Principle 7: Recognize recognition. That is, recognize people who recognize others for doing what is best for the company.

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Table of Contents


PART I: DAY-TO-DAY RECOGNITION .. . . . 1
Personal Praise & Recognition . . . . . 5
Written Praise & Recognition . . . . 13
Electronic Praise & Recognition . . 26
Public Praise & Recognition . .. . 31

PART II: INFORMAL INTANGIBLE RECOGNITION . . . . 43
Information, Support & Involvement . . . 45
Autonomy & Authority . . . . . . 55
Flexible Work Hours & Time Off . .. . 64
Learning & Career Development . . . . 75
Manager Availability & Time . .. . 86

PART III: TANGIBLE RECOGNITION & REWARDS . . . 95
Outstanding Employee & Achievement Awards. . .. . 97
Cash, Cash Substitutes & Gift Certificates . . . 115
Nominal Gifts, Merchandise & Food . . . . 128
Special Privileges, Perks & Employee Services . . . 141

PART IV: GROUP RECOGNITION, REWARDS & ACTIVITIES. . . . . . 153
Group Recognition & Rewards . . . . 156
Fun, Games & Contests . . . .. . . 170
Celebrations, Parties & Special Events . .. . 191
Field Trips & Travel . . .. . 202
PART V: REWARDS FOR SPECIFIC ACHIEVEMENTS . . . . 210
Sales Revenue . . . 212
Customer Service . . . . . 229
Employee Suggestions . .. 244
Productivity & Quality . . 255
Attendance & Safety . . . . . 263
PART VI: FORMAL ORGANIZATIONAL REWARD PROGRAMS. . . . 270
Multilevel Reward Programs & Point Systems . . . 271
Company Benefits & Perks . . . . 284
Employee & Company Anniversaries . . .. 303
Charity & Community Service . . . . . . 314
Company Stock & Ownership . . .. . . . 324

APPENDIXES . . . 330
I.Where to Get Specialty Reward Items . . .. 330
II. Companies That Arrange Unusual Reward Activities. . . 339
III. Incentive Travel Coordinators . .. 344
IV. Motivational and Incentive Companies and Associations . . . . . 350
V. Featured Companies . . . 353

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Reward yourself- buy this book.

    This book is great and works under the premise that you get the best effort out of people, not by lighting a fire under them, but by building a fire within them. <BR/><BR/>In short, its simply a collection of ways to reward employees for doing a good job. It is divided into 6 sections (day to day rewards, intangible rewards, tangible rewards..) so there's definitely a boatload of reward ideas to fit just about any work situation. Examples from companies across the United States make this a fun read as well. Also good for any HR department- The Sixty-Second Motivator.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2005

    Not really 1001 Ways to Reward Employees

    Many of the ideas gathered in the book are repetitive so that there are many examples of the same reward idea. A lot of the ideas are great for organizations who provide a product or a service they can give employees as rewards, but in health care, that is not possible. For non-profit organizations, a lot of these ideas are not applicable, also.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2006

    Reward yourself- buy this book.

    This book is great and works under the premise that you get the best effort out of people not by lighting a fire under them, but by building a fire within them. In short, its simply a collection of ways to reward employees for doing a good job. Its divided into 6 sections (day to day rewards, intangible rewards, tangible rewards..) so there's definitely a boatload of reward ideas to fit just about any work situation. Examples from companies across the United States make it a fun read as well.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2000

    Tired and stale

    Here we go again. I read this book and can say that I picked up a few good ideas, but certainly not 1001 new ideas. It may be useful to someone who is clueless, but, gosh, these things are common sense and have been kicked around for years. Save your money.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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