101 Fat-Burning Workouts & Diet Strategies For Men: Everything You Need to Get a Lean, Strong and Fit Physique

101 Fat-Burning Workouts & Diet Strategies For Men: Everything You Need to Get a Lean, Strong and Fit Physique

by Michael Berg
     
 

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The perfect resource for anyone looking to lose weight and look great, this health guide includes easy-to-follow cardio and weight training routines, recipes, and meal plans. Following on the heels of the ultra-successful Triumph titles, 101 Workouts and 101 Workouts for Women, is a new book in the "101" series that delivers even more breakthrough

Overview

The perfect resource for anyone looking to lose weight and look great, this health guide includes easy-to-follow cardio and weight training routines, recipes, and meal plans. Following on the heels of the ultra-successful Triumph titles, 101 Workouts and 101 Workouts for Women, is a new book in the "101" series that delivers even more breakthrough fitness advice for people of all ages. In 101 Fat-Burning Workouts & Diet Strategies for Men, the editors of Muscle & Fitness magazine provide expert workouts, high-energy cardio routines, body-sculpting meal plans, and tasty low-fat recipes.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781623683955
Publisher:
Triumph Books
Publication date:
12/01/2008
Series:
101 Workouts
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
645,244
File size:
9 MB

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Read an Excerpt

101 Fat-Burning Workouts & Diet Strategies


By Michael Berg, Per Bernal, Art Brewer, Charles Imstepf Studios, Michael Darter, Kevin Horton, Iconmen.com, Naj Jamai, Blake Little, Ian Logan, Geoffrey Nicholson, Joaquin Palting, Robert Reiff, Marc Royce, Ian Spanier, Brian Velenchenko and Pavel Ythjall

Triumph Books

Copyright © 2008 Weider Publications, LLC
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-62368-395-5



CHAPTER 1

Ultimate Training Guide


We've all been there. In general, your workouts have never been better, but those pesky lower lats are about as responsive as a tackle dummy Or maybe your outer quads or front delts are more Gary Coleman than Ronnie Coleman and just refuse to grow. Then again, perhaps the problem is your entire pec area, or you sport hams that are more like Spam — soft and far from the real thing. Or it could be you're just pressed for time and want to know how to perform a decent back workout in just 15 minutes.

Cue "Workout Central," your one-stop shop for muscle size, strength and definition. In this chapter, we offer 86 workouts, one or more of which we can virtually guarantee will solve your individual training problems. You'd be hard-pressed to find this many individual routines so easy to navigate in one place.

In addition, we provide an efficient 40-minute, total-body workout plan designed especially for those balancing a great physique with a hectic schedule, plus targeted advice for gaining overall muscle mass or getting super lean. So what are you waiting for? Identify your problem, look up the solution and start turning a weakness into a strength.


MAKE IT WORK FOR YOU

This chapter is designed to help anyone construct a workout specifically for his needs. In the list at left, you'll see all of the various types of training sessions we provide for all of the major bodyparts.

Here's how to use it. Say your goal is to pack more muscle onto a skinny frame. Just pick out all of the "mass-building routines" and assemble them into one training split — you could do chest and triceps on Monday, back and bi's on Tuesday, thighs and calves on Thursday, and delts, traps, forearms (and abs) on Friday. Same advice goes if you're after more strength — pull out all the "strength" workouts and design a weekly split that works within your schedule.

Of course, you don't have to completely revamp your current workout routine, if you have one. You can use the following workouts as replacements for one or more bodypart-focused routines, as a way to freshen up a stale regimen. You can even pick out a few new exercises and insert them into existing workouts. The options are limited only by your imagination.


BACK

When targeting a specific area of a muscle, exercise selection is key. In the lower lats priority workout, the movements (most notably back exercises performed using a narrow reverse grip, including the chin) are all effective at zeroing in on the lower portion of the lats, which, when fully developed, create a more dramatic V-taper. In the upper lats priority workout, all exercises are done with a wide overhand grip, which helps develop back width just below the armpits. Ideally you'd utilize both underhand and overhand grips in a given back workout, but each of the aforementioned routines are great for bringing up their respective areas when a weakness is present.


Dumbbell Row

» Bend at the waist, placing one knee and the same-side hand on a flat bench (or lean into a sturdy rack). If using a bench, keep your other foot on the floor beside it and hold a dumbbell in the same-side hand, arm fully extended down. pull the weight toward your hip, bringing your elbow up as high as you can, keeping it close to you. Squeeze your shoulder blades together, then lower the weight along the same path. Repeat for reps, then switch arms.


Seated Row

Attach a close-grip handle to a row apparatus and sit upright on the bench facing the weight stack. place your feet on the platform, legs slightly bent. reach forward to grasp the handle; keep your back flat and chest up. with your torso erect, arms fully extended, pull the handle toward your midsection. Keep your elbows in, your torso erect and your head in a neutral position. Squeeze your back muscles. Hold for 1-2 seconds before slowly returning to the start position.


Deadlift

Feet flat under a bar, squat down and take a slightly wider than shoulder-width grip. allow the bar to rest against your shins. with your chest up and back flat, lift the bar by extending your hips and knees fully. Keep your arms straight throughout, as you drag the bar up your legs till you are in a standing position. Squeeze your back, legs and glutes, then lower the bar along the same path till it touches the floor. allow the bar to settle before beginning the next rep.


T-Bar Row

With your arms fully extended, grasp the handles with an overhand, palms-forward grip. Wrap your thumbs around the bar for safety. Lift the bar upward, remaining in the bent-over position. Keep your chest up and back flat, head in a neutral position. Pull the handles toward you, keeping your elbows close to your body. Do not allow your upper body to raise in an effort to pull the weight upward. Hold the peak contracted position momentarily before slowly lowering the weight to the starting position.


Machine Row

Sit at a selectorized row machine, with your feet flat on the floor and your chest pressed against the pad. Grasp the handles with either a neutral or overhand grip, and pull the handles toward you, squeezing your lats briefly, then return to the start and repeat.


Straight-Arm Lat Pulldown

Stand facing the weight stack at a lat-pulldown station with your feet shoulder-width apart. Reach up and grasp a standard lat-pulldown bar or long straight bar with an overhand (pronated) grip, hands shoulder-width apart, arms straight. Start with the bar at shoulder level, arms extended and parallel to the floor. Keeping your arms straight, pull the bar down toward your thighs in a wide, sweeping arc, focusing on using just your lats. Exhale as you pass the midpoint of the move, and squeeze your lats hard once the bar reaches your thighs. Return to the starting position in a smooth, controlled motion, stopping once your arms are parallel to the floor.


Bent-Over Row

Standing with your feet shoulder-width apart, grasp a barbell with a wide, overhand grip. Keeping your knees slightly bent, lean forward at your waist until your torso is roughly parallel with the floor. The barbell should hang straight down in front of your shins. Without raising your upper body, pull the barbell up toward your abdomen, bringing your elbows high and above the level of your back. Hold the bar in the peak-contracted position for a brief count, then slowly lower along the same path. Repeat for reps.


Reverse-Grip Pulldown

Attach a long lat bar to the pulley and adjust the kneepad for a snug fit. Grasp the bar with a reverse, shoulder-width grip and sit down, maintaining erect posture by contracting your lower back. Your arms should be extended above you, your head straight and feet flat on the floor. Contract your lats to pull the bar to your upper chest, bringing your elbows straight down and behind you. Squeeze your shoulder blades together at the bottom and hold the peak contraction briefly. Slowly return the bar along the same path and repeat.


Close-Grip Pulldown

Attach a V-bar to the pulley and adjust the kneepad so that you fit snugly in the seat. Grasp the bar with a neutral grip and sit down, maintaining an erect posture by contracting your lower back. Your arms should be fully extended above you with your head straight and feet flat on the floor. Contract your lats to pull the bar down to your upper chest, bringing your elbows straight down. Squeeze your lats as you hold the peak contracted position for a brief count. Slowly return the handle along the same path and repeat.


Pullover

Lie perpendicular across a bench, with your upper back, head and neck supported by the bench. Your feet should be flat on the floor. Hold a dumbbell with your arms extended above your face. Keeping your arms straight, slowly lower the dumbbell back toward the top of your head, feeling a good stretch in your chest. Pause, then forcefully reverse direction with the dumbbell, squeezing your chest at the top.


Standing Low Cable Row

Stand facing the cable low pulley and grasp the V-bar. Bend your knees, keeping your back flat and chest up. Allow your arms to point directly toward the low pulley, fully extended. Keeping your abs tight, pull the handle into your lower abs. Squeeze your lats, then return to the start position.


Lat Pulldown

Sit at a lat pulldown machine so the bar is directly overhead or slightly in front of your body. Adjust the pads so your quads fit snugly beneath. Grasp the angled ends of the bar with a wide, overhand grip. Keep your abs tight and back slightly arched with your feet flat on the floor. Squeeze your shoulder blades together and pull the bar down to your upper chest, keeping your elbows back and pointed out toward the sides in the same plane as your body. Squeeze and hold for a brief count before slowly allowing the bar up along the same path.


Pull-Up

Grasp a fixed overhead bar with a wide overhand grip, your thumbs wrapped around the bar for safety. Hang freely from the bar, arms fully extended and feet crossed behind you. Contract your lats to raise your chin over the bar. Concentrate on keeping your elbows out to your sides, and pulling them down to your sides to raise yourself. Hold momentarily in the peak contracted position before lowering yourself down to the start.


CHEST

The mass-building workout included in the chart at right incorporates three variables that are crucial to adding size: 1) compound exercises in the form of barbell and dumbbell presses and dips; 2) high volume, as the workout consists of 17 total sets, including five each for the first two exercises; 3) rep ranges of 8-12 (the exception being two sets of six on the incline bench press), which is the optimal rep scheme for promoting hypertrophy. Weighted, not body weight, dips are included to maintain this rep range, since many individuals are able to exceed 12 reps without added resistance. The routine attacks all areas of the chest — upper, middle and lower pecs with incline presses, flat-bench dumbbell presses and decline flyes, respectively — to achieve overall development.


Weighted Dip

With weight hanging around your waist, grasp the dip bars with your arms extended. Lean forward and bend your knees while keeping your legs crossed. Keep your elbows out to your sides as you bend them to lower your body down until your upper arms are about parallel to the floor. Press your hands into the bars to extend your arms and raise your body back up.


Decline Dumbbell Press

Lie faceup on a decline bench set at about a 45-degree angle. Your torso should be fully supported from your head to your hips, with your knees bent and feet supported. Have a partner hand you a dumbbell in each hand. Extend your arms to hold the dumbbells up toward the ceiling with your palms forward. Bend your arms and slowly lower the dumbbells toward the outsides of your chest. (during the barbell version, the bar would come to your lower chest). When the dumbbells reach chest level, forcefully extend your arms, pressing the dumbbells back to the starting position.


Incline Bench Press

Lie on an incline bench set at approximately 30-45 degrees. Spread your legs with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp the barbell with a pronated (overhand) grip, wider than shoulder-width. Unrack the bar and hold it directly above your upper chest. Slowly lower the bar to your upper chest. without bouncing the bar off of yourself, powerfully press it back up to the starting position. Pause momentarily in the top position before repeating for reps.


Decline Push-Up

Place both of your feet on a bench or similar elevated surface, with your hands wider than shoulder-width and flat on the floor and your arms fully extended. Keeping your head neutral and abs tight, lower yourself toward the floor until your chest gently touches, then press through your hands until your arms are fully extended and repeat.


Smith Bench Press

Place a bench centered inside a Smith machine. Grasp the bar with a wide, overhand grip. Rotate the bar to unrack it. Slowly lower the bar to your lower chest, pausing when the bar is just about an inch away from your pecs, then powerfully press the bar back up to full arm extension and repeat.


Flat Cable Flye

Place a flat bench equidistant between two low pulley cables. Grasp the two d-handles attached to the cables and lie flat on the bench. Keeping your arms slightly bent, pull the handles in front of you, as if you were hugging a barrel, squeezing your chest when your hands are above your torso. Then lower the handles back to the start, stopping when your upper arms are parallel with the bench.


Decline Bench Press

Lie face-up on a decline bench set at about a 45-degree angle. Your torso should be fully supported from your head to your hips, with your knees bent and feet supported, as well. Grasp the bar with a wide, overhand grip. Bend your arms and slowly lower the bar toward your lower chest. when the bar reaches chest level, forcefully extend your arms pressing the bar back to the starting position.


Smith Incline Press

Lie on an incline bench set at approximately 30-45 degrees, placed inside a Smith machine. Spread your legs with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp the barbell with a pronated (overhand) grip, outside shoulder-width. Rotate and unrack the bar and hold it directly above your upper chest. Slowly lower the bar to your upper chest. Without bouncing the bar, powerfully press it back up to the starting position. Pause momentarily at the top before repeating for reps.


Smith Decline Press

Lie face-up on a decline bench set at about a 45-degree angle, set inside a Smith machine. Your torso should be fully supported from your head to your hips, with your knees bent and feet tucked behind footrests. Grasp the bar with a wide, overhand grip and rotate the bar to unrack it and hold it directly above you. Bend your arms and slowly lower the bar toward your lower chest. When the bar reaches chest level, forcefully extend your arms, pressing the bar back to the starting position.


Incline Machine Press

Adjust the machine so your back rests comfortably against the pad and your feet are flat on the floor. The handles should be aligned right at or just below shoulder level when you sit down. Press the handles away from you until your arms are fully extended without locking out your elbows. Slowly bring the handles back toward your chest without letting the weights touch the stack and repeat.


Flat Dumbbell Flye

Lie face-up on the bench with your feet flat on the floor. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with a neutral grip and extend your arms above your chest. Bend your elbows slightly. Slowly lower the dumbbells in a wide arc down to your sides. Keep your elbows locked in the slightly bent position throughout. Stop when your elbows reach shoulder level before reversing the motion.


Incline Dumbbell Press

Adjust a bench so that the incline in the bench is 30-45 degrees. Lie face-up on the bench with your feet flat on the floor. Hold a dumbbell in each hand just outside your shoulders. Powerfully press the dumbbells upward toward the ceiling, stopping when the dumbbells are an inch or so away from each other, then slowly return the dumbbells to the start and repeat.


Decline Dumbbell Flye

Lie face-up on the decline bench with your feet secured under the pads. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with a neutral grip and extend your arms above your chest. Bend your elbows slightly. Slowly lower the dumbbells in a wide arc down to your sides. Keep your elbows locked in the slightly bent position throughout the range of motion. Stop when your elbows reach shoulder level before reversing the motion.


Incline Dumbbell Flye

Adjust a bench to roughly 30-45 degrees. Lie faceup with your feet flat on the floor. Hold a dumbbell in each hand with a neutral grip and extend your arms above your chest. Bend your elbows slightly. Slowly lower the dumbbells in a wide arc down to your sides. Keep your elbows locked in the slightly bent position throughout the range of motion. Stop when your elbows reach shoulder level before reversing the motion.


Incline Cable Flye

Adjust a bench inside a cable crossover so that the incline in the bench is roughly 30-45 degrees. Lie face-up on the bench with your feet flat on the floor. Hold a d- handle in each hand with a neutral grip and extend your arms above your chest. Bend your elbows slightly. Slowly lower the handles in a wide arc out to your sides. Keep your elbows locked in the slightly bent position throughout the range of motion. Stop when your elbows reach shoulder level, then reverse the motion.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from 101 Fat-Burning Workouts & Diet Strategies by Michael Berg, Per Bernal, Art Brewer, Charles Imstepf Studios, Michael Darter, Kevin Horton, Iconmen.com, Naj Jamai, Blake Little, Ian Logan, Geoffrey Nicholson, Joaquin Palting, Robert Reiff, Marc Royce, Ian Spanier, Brian Velenchenko and Pavel Ythjall. Copyright © 2008 Weider Publications, LLC. Excerpted by permission of Triumph Books.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Michael Berg, NSCA-CPT, is a financial editor at Newsmax Media and the former editor-in-chief of Muscle & Performance Magazine. His articles have appeared in numerous publications, including Better Nutrition, Maximum Fitness, Men’s Fitness, and Renew Magazine. Muscle & Fitness is bodybuilding magazine that offers professional exercise and nutritional.

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