101 Most Powerful Proverbs in the Bible [NOOK Book]

Overview

101 MOST POWERFUL PROVERBS IN THE BIBLE takes the best of the proverbs and details them for us. Filled with illustrations of daily life, it seeks to remind us of what's truly important--living wisely, kindly, and well.
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101 Most Powerful Proverbs in the Bible

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Overview

101 MOST POWERFUL PROVERBS IN THE BIBLE takes the best of the proverbs and details them for us. Filled with illustrations of daily life, it seeks to remind us of what's truly important--living wisely, kindly, and well.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This heavily anecdotal, occasionally touching and exasperatingly uneven collection of meditations surveys the Book of Proverbs, the venerable aphorisms of Hebrew scripture, as an extended lesson in character development. The reader will come away with a helpful sense of the range of topics covered by the ancient Proverbs writers, who were capable of comforting clarity about what happens to fools and evildoers and also of caustic observations about money management (and mismanagement) that could be ripped from today's financial pages. Drawing on sources as diverse as his immediate family, Calvin Coolidge and the rock group the Eagles, Lang portrays Proverbs as a collection of fundamental lessons in morality that need to be relearned in each generation. Although Lang, a well-established author and former book editor, is clearly well versed in European and American history, he sometimes descends to gross generalizations, e.g., "the main reason that so many cities today are hellish places to live is that so many of the inhabitants have no self-control." Some will be amused, and some probably annoyed, by the writer's fondness for Confederate General "Stonewall" Jackson and the 16th-century Scottish Protestant firebrand John Knox. Lang's essays are often powerful, occasionally incisive and more often than not instructive. Like the other books in the "101 Most Powerful" series (previous installments have explored biblical prayers and promises), each brief meditation closes with a resolution for readers; some of these are useful, some close to silly. (Jan. 21) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780759508774
  • Publisher: FaithWords
  • Publication date: 2/1/2004
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,212,053
  • File size: 790 KB

Read an Excerpt

101 Most Powerful Proverbs in the Bible


By Steve Rabey Lois Rabey J. Stephan Lang

Warner Faith

Copyright © 2004 J. Stephen Lang
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-446-53215-0


Chapter One

Brain Stretching and Ear Tuning

The hearing ear and the seeing eye, the LORD has made them both. Proverbs 20:12

ALL you have to do is pay attention." Thus said my scoutmaster back in Boy Scout days. Whatever we were learning- tying knots, flag signals-he firmly believed we could master it easily, so long as we paid attention to what he showed us. He told us that if we could memorize the lyrics to all the pop music hits (and we did), we could certainly learn to tie basic knots.

"All you have to do is pay attention." Thus said my college biology teacher. The class members were learning the life cycles of various forms of algae. It was neither fun nor exciting, yet he assured us the knowledge would have some value further down the line (not true), plus it "stretched the brain muscles" (so he said) to memorize the sequences of biological processes. He was right about the stretching.

Our brain muscles got a good stretching, and memorizing was not so difficult, so long as we paid attention.

Another teacher sometimes used the phrase "He who has ears to hear, let him hear." I'm referring to Jesus, who often taught in parables, the simple stories with a deep meaning that not everyone grasped. Jesus knew what any teacher knows: the learner's alertness is a crucial part of the learning process. Even the best teacher cannot force-feed the lesson. God gives us our senses, God gives us teachers, but only we ourselves can supply the openness and willingness to learn.

Proverbs is a pay-attention book. Not faraway philosophers but sensible observers of the world wrote it. They had paid attention to life-their own lives, and those of others. They were passing on their life lessons to another generation. We are still learning those lessons today, as is evident by your reading this book. Most are so basic and simple-like two plus two. And, like two plus two, those moral lessons must be retaught to every generation.

It is in the nature of man that practically no one learns from experience. The mistakes of the fathers are lost on their children. Yet the fathers, if they are doing their duties, still try to pass on their experience-won wisdom to the children. If the children will use the eyes and ears God gave them, they do well. Every teacher and parent knows a child can "tune in" his eyes and ears to what truly interests him. The message of the Book of Proverbs is Tune in to the greatest concern in human life: getting along well with others and being a person of integrity.

If a group of hyperactive eleven-year-old Boy Scouts can memorize knots and a roomful of college students can memorize the life cycle of blue-green algae, surely people of faith can (if they use their eyes and ears) learn the basic lessons about a righteous life in this world.

Nothing that difficult. "All you have to do is pay attention."

Resolution: As you go through the rest of your day, stay alert to everything around you-as if you were going to be quizzed on your whole day.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from 101 Most Powerful Proverbs in the Bible by Steve Rabey Lois Rabey J. Stephan Lang Copyright © 2004 by J. Stephen Lang. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2004

    Good Read, Great Gift

    Honestly, I had never read the Book of Proverbs in the Bible, though I suppose I had heard them quoted before without realizing it. This delightful book brought many of them to life. Each brief chapter begins with one of the Proverbs, followed by a story illustrating it. The stories are drawn from history, literature, even the author's own personal experiences. The stories made me realize just how down-to-earth the Proverbs of the Bible are, wonderfully inspired commonsense observations that we all need to remember. I have zero interest in theology (my husband does, but he's a pastor) but I am very interested in living a better life (who isn't?), and I can honestly say this book enriched my own life. And incidentally, it did make me go back and read the Book of Proverbs all the way through.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2003

    Interesting extracts from the bible

    The biblical Book of Proverbs is more of a values tome providing guidance on how to live in harmony in one¿s daily life. The 101 MOST POWERFUL PROVERBS IN THE BIBLE looks at particular proverbs chosen by the author as the most critical to adhere to in the consideration of others. The admired scripture adages provide guidance on a wide range of subjects that if followed lead to a complete positive person helping one¿s family, religion, and community, which in turn helps the person become productive. Amazingly though from ancient writings, these seem apropos in the information age of corporate scandal, school massacres, suicide bombings, and weapons of mass destruction. <P>Each of the chosen ones include anecdotes and essays by J. Stephen Lang that are intended to further provide deep yet simplistic morality instructions in a modern text. However, that is the strength and weakness of the book as some make sense and add depth while others seem inane and seemingly unrelated. When Mr. Lang enhances the proverb with a powerful essay, the book takes off; when he seems to be adding filler the tome falls flat. Still worth reading, the audience should follow those that logically add depth and skip over those don¿t. <P>Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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