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101 Things I Learned in Film School
     

101 Things I Learned in Film School

4.6 5
by Neil Landau, Matthew Frederick (With)
 

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How to set a scene? What's the best camera angle? How does the new technology interact with scenes? And how does one even get the financing to make a movie?

These basic questions and much more are all covered in this exquisite packaged book on the film industry and making movies as a profession. Written by Neil Landau, an experienced screenwriter and script

Overview

How to set a scene? What's the best camera angle? How does the new technology interact with scenes? And how does one even get the financing to make a movie?

These basic questions and much more are all covered in this exquisite packaged book on the film industry and making movies as a profession. Written by Neil Landau, an experienced screenwriter and script consultant to the major movie studios, this is the perfect book for anyone who wants to know about the inner-workings of this industry. Whether it's someone who wants to make movies as a full-timecareer, or just someone who is interested in film, this book covers it all.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446550277
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
05/20/2010
Pages:
212
Sales rank:
217,181
Product dimensions:
7.38(w) x 5.36(h) x 0.89(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Neil Landau's credits include writing for and producing for Universal Pictures, Disney, Columbia Pictures, and 20th Century Fox. He's worked on such diverse projects as "Melrose Place," "Doogie Howser MD," MTV's "Undressed," and "Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead."

He currently serves as a faculty advisor in the MFA Writing Program at Goddard College and teaches at the UCLA School of Theatre, Film and Television.

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101 Things I Learned in Film School 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ryst More than 1 year ago
This was a very entertaining and, at times, hilarious look at some of the things you learn in Film school. I currently attend a media arts program (I came here for audio post production for television and film) and many of the things presented in this book are stuff I experience every day. The irony of the entire thing is that while some may look at this as a very basic book, it covers just about every nuance you'll run into in the film industry. From eye lines to existential conflicts...It's got it all. Bonus points can be added for the fact that the anecdotes are on one page while funny little illustrations feature on the opposing page. Spiffy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LaughingStars More than 1 year ago
Film making is essentially storytelling, and as a writing teacher and avid reader, it's always fascinated me. I have been wanting to learn more about this storytelling process, and about the nuts and bolts of movie-making - including scriptwriting, camera angles, and editing - in a way that's relatively quick and accessible. This little book, recommended by Trisha at Eclectic Eccentric, was perfect for me. It's deceptively straightforward and simple but rich with information. It helped me grasp the process of film-making, which Neil Landau described as both "painstakingly deliberate and fortuitously experimental." I am excited about looking for some of techniques he described next time I watch an excellent movie. Some aspects of movie making the author touches on: * The stages of film-making - from pre-production to post-production. * The nuts and bolts of screenplays - have you ever wondered how to format a screenplay or how long it should be? (hint: 1 screenplay page = 1 minute of screen time) * Writing and editing the screenplay - it includes some of the standard gems cherished by us writing teachers, like "show, don't tell," plus tips for plotting, advice on developing a compelling protagonist, and more. * Coming up with an effective movie title. * Creating believable dialogue. * How to pitch a screenplay to a film studio executive. * How to use lighting and various camera lenses and angles to tell your story and reveal important things about a character's psychology. * Tips for casting. * Things the audience should experience during a movie, like catharsis. This is a concise, intriguing overview of the art of film making, strewn with quotes from movie makers, actors, and writers, that I'll be keeping on a side table in my T.V. room for future reference. Many of the ideas explored in this book, including plot development, creating characters, storytelling, themes, and imagery, will also help with reading or writing fiction. I highly recommend it to writers, film buffs, teachers, homeschoolers and anyone who is fascinated with the process of telling a compelling story.