101 Things You Should Know About Geography

101 Things You Should Know About Geography

3.0 1
by Sonia Mehta
     
 
 What's the difference between magma and lava?
How can you measure latitude and longitude?
Why do geography questions make my head pound?

Sometimes geography can feel like a huge mass of info to learn by rote and remember. But it's actually an incredibly important way to make sense of our complex and unpredictable world. From glaciers and

Overview

 What's the difference between magma and lava?
How can you measure latitude and longitude?
Why do geography questions make my head pound?

Sometimes geography can feel like a huge mass of info to learn by rote and remember. But it's actually an incredibly important way to make sense of our complex and unpredictable world. From glaciers and global warming to latitude and longitude, this book goes right to the point, providing students with 101 of the most important geographic facts they'll need to know. It's fast, it's fun, and it's the perfect introduction to a subject that's cooler than kids ever imagined!

 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781454910442
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
02/18/2014
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
827,357
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

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101 Things You Should Know About Geography 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Heidi_G More than 1 year ago
3.5 stars Students will enjoy this book because it gives interesting facts about topics that aren't generally taught in school or if they are taught, it is not with detail. Topics such as the Mariana Trench, weather fronts and the angler fish will intrigue young scientists. However, when I think of geography, I think more of topography as in what is on the surface of the earth and what is below it; I generally don’t include astronomy when thinking of the earth’s geography. The target audience probably won’t be concerned about this, though. Another proofread or perhaps another edit would’ve helped out. The second topic, “Naming Pluto,” and the eighth, “Dwarf Planets,” both mention Pluto was degraded from planet to dwarf planet in 2006 but there is no mention of what the requirements are to be a planet (which Pluto doesn’t meet). Perhaps I’m being overly picky but the sentence “Studies of such Martian rocks have revealed that Mars, was once a wet planet” in the third topic seemed to jump out at me. The comma is in that sentence why? Again, probably not going to be noticed by the target audience. Despite a couple more detractors like mentioned above, I will purchase this for my school library as my students will find it interesting and humorous.