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101 Ways to Bug Your Teacher
     

101 Ways to Bug Your Teacher

4.8 5
by Lee Wardlaw
 

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Thirteen-year-old Steve "Sneeze" Wyatt is proud to be known for his fabulous inventions, but unfortunately they are also the reason his parents want him to skip a grade and leave all of his friends behind! Well, there's no way that the resourceful Sneeze is going to let that happen. So, this time around he's come up with 101 sure-fire methods to drive his teachers

Overview

Thirteen-year-old Steve "Sneeze" Wyatt is proud to be known for his fabulous inventions, but unfortunately they are also the reason his parents want him to skip a grade and leave all of his friends behind! Well, there's no way that the resourceful Sneeze is going to let that happen. So, this time around he's come up with 101 sure-fire methods to drive his teachers absolutely batty . . . and not even a worrisome case of inventor's block or fear of a scary teacher nicknamed Fierce will deter him from his plan.

In the tradition of Louis Sachar's There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, this humorous tale of a boy at his wits' end will keep young readers laughing from start to show-stopping finish.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In the sequel to 101 Ways to Bug Your Parents, 101 Ways to Bug Your Teacher by Lee Wardlaw, Sneeze struggles with "inventor's block" and begins to misbehave at school to sabotage his parents' attempts to get him into high school early. The book ends with the titular list. (Aug.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
In this sequel to Wardlaw's popular 101 Ways to Bug Your Parents, seventh-grader Steve (Sneeze) Wyatt needs to find 101 ways to bug his teachers, in particular his tough-as-nails history teacher, Ms. Pierce (AKA Fierce), so that his parents will realize he's too immature to be skipped straight to high school—where he'd have to confront the scary truth that he, inventor extraordinaire, is now suffering from "inventor's block." Wardlaw's characters tend toward one-dimensional caricatures—e.g., hiccupping Hiccup, who has such a powerful crush on Sneeze's mother that just one glimpse of her cures him of the hiccups that had landed him in the hospital, and Pierre (actually Peter), who fancies himself to be from France (actually from Chicago), a would-be chef who speaks in a delightful fake French accent ("Does he have zee cure for heecups?"). The plot tends toward unbelievable coincidence (Guess who Sneeze's friend Hayley's dad turns out to be dating?) and outrageous slapstick. But the whole package is so likeable and enjoyable that both eager and reluctant readers should swallow it all, with a satisfying hiccup of appreciation. And Sneeze's epiphany revelation—that he can't do what others expect of him, but only what he expects of himself—is a valuable lesson sugar-coated in this good-natured and often hilarious romp. Includes instructions for how to make a chicken mummy. 2004, Dial, Ages 8 to 12.
—Claudia Mills, Ph.D.
VOYA
Sneeze, Hiccup, and Hayley return in this sequel to 101 Ways to Bug Your Parents (Dial, 1996). This time they are in seventh grade, coping with the meanest teacher in their school, a redheaded history teacher nicknamed Fierce, who has devised some unusual forms of discipline. As the class works on its Egyptian culture project for the annual History Faire, Sneeze works through some personal issues by misbehaving in class according to his list of ways to bug a teacher. His loss of enthusiasm for inventing, his parents' wish to accelerate his schooling, and his mother's unexpected pregnancy all manifest themselves in a disastrous presentation at the fair involving a mummified chicken and two hungry dogs. Meanwhile Hiccup cannot get rid of the hiccups, and Hayley must face her father's new girlfriend. The list of ways to bug teachers appearing at the end of the book is laugh-aloud material, and the instructions for mummifying a chicken are intriguing. The characters face problems to which teens will relate: pressures at school, romantic lives of parents, and change of heart. The adult figures are complex characters, especially Fierce, who reveals herself to be resourceful and innovative in her teaching methods. Both boys and girls will enjoy this book. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P M J (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2004, Dial, 240p., Ages 11 to 15.
—Jenny Ingram
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Steve "Sneeze" Wyatt, inventor extraordinaire, and his friends from 101 Ways to Bug Your Parents (Dial, 1996) are back in another fast-paced and humorous adventure at Jefferson Middle School. Everyone is counting on Steve to come up with a project idea for the History Faire. What they don't realize, and he is unwilling to share, is that he has "inventor's block." When his parents reveal that they are arranging for him to skip eighth grade and move on to high school next year in order to encourage his inventing skills, he can't even admit the truth to them. How can he stop this plan from going forward and keep his secret? By causing trouble during class, of course. With the help of his friends and family, Steve eventually admits his problem and finds resolution. References are made to the first book, but this one can stand alone. In spite of the title, the characters show respect for their teachers and parents, and for one another. A delightful read.-Denise Moore, O'Gorman Junior High School, Sioux Falls, SD Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803726581
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date:
07/22/2004
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.74(w) x 8.66(h) x 0.95(d)
Age Range:
8 - 9 Years

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101 Ways to Bug Your Teacher 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think the book was good because he bugged his teachers for a reason. He bugged them because he wanted to get in trouble so much so he wouldn't skip a grade and go to high school right away without telling his parents.He didn't want to high school because he didn't want to leave his friends behind in middle school.I also liked it because it was funny because of the list he made to bug his teachers and because of the plot.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book about Sneeze is funny and catchy. Sneeze is ready to sell his invention when he goes to an inventors convention. Then his parents enroll him in a writing class instead! Will he ever get to sell his creation? He writes a book all about bugging parents and uses his parents as test dummies as a way of revenge.It keeps you reading to the end with new twists all the while.
Guest More than 1 year ago
101 Ways to Bug Your Teacher is a 2005 IRA/ CBC Children's Choice Book a PSLA 'Top Forty' Book and on the ALAN Review/NCTE Bill's Best Books (October 2004) list. It has also been named to the Chicago Public Schools Recommended Reading List for 5th Grades.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is really cool.I can tell You that because it is. I borrowed it from the library and is very good! I'm telling you, you should buy it.