12 BASIC PROPOSITIONS OF MAJOR TACTICS FOR CHESS

12 BASIC PROPOSITIONS OF MAJOR TACTICS FOR CHESS

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by Franklin K. Young
     
 
Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!) This excerpt includes text only, but the Nook edition is elaborately illustrated: INTRODUCTORY - Following are the twelve basic propositions of Major Tactics. Upon these are founded all tactical combinations which are possible in chess play. The first four

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Scanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!) This excerpt includes text only, but the Nook edition is elaborately illustrated: INTRODUCTORY - Following are the twelve basic propositions of Major Tactics. Upon these are founded all tactical combinations which are possible in chess play. The first four propositions govern all calculations whose object is to win adverse pieces; the next seven govern all calculations whose object is to queen one or more pawns; and the final one governs all those calculations whose object is to checkmate the adverse King. A Geometric Symbol is positive (G. S. P.) when the piece to which it appertains has the right of move in the given situation; otherwise it is negative (G. S. N.) In all situations wherein the Exposed Piece has the right of move the Point Material is active (P. M. A.), and in all other cases the Point Material is passive (P. M. P.). PROPOSITION I. — Theorem. Given a Geometric Symbol Positive (G. S. P.) having one or more Points Material (P. M.), then the kindred Prime Tactical Factor (P. T. F.) wins an adverse piece. PROPOSITION II. —Theorem. Given a Geometric Symbol Negative (G. S. N.) having two or more Points Material Active (P. M. A.), then the kindred Prime Tactical Factor (P. T. F.) wins an adverse piece. Note — Black, even with the move, can vacate only one of the vertices of the white geometric symbol. Therefore the remaining black piece is lost, according to Prop. I. Note. — Black, even with the move, cannot vacate the perimeter of the white Knight's octagon; consequently the remaining black piece is lost, according to Prop. I. Note. — Black, even with the move, cannot vacate the side of the white Bishop's triangle; consequently the remaining black piece is lost, according to Prop. I. Note. — The Knight cannot in one move support the Bishop, neither can the Bishop occupy its K 2 or K 8 to support the Knight, as these points are commanded by the white Rook.
Note. — Obviously all those points to which the black Knight can move are commanded by the white Queen. Note. — The Bishop cannot support the Rook, neither can the Rook occupy K B 4 in support of the Bishop, as that point is commanded by the white King. PROPOSITION III. —Theorem. Given a Sub-Geometric Symbol Positive (S. G. S. P.) having two or more Points Material Passive (P. M. P.), then the kindred Prime Tactical Factor (P. T. F.) wins an adverse piece. Note. — The pawn, having the move, advances along its Front Offensive to that point where its logistic symbol and its geometric symbol intersect. Note.—The Point of Command is that centre or vertex where the logistic symbol and the geometric symbol intersect.
Note.—The diagram illustrative of any position always should contain the logistic symbol and the geometric symbol appertaining to the Prime Tactical Factor. Note. — The Point of Command and the points material are all contained in the same sides of the Rook's quadrilateral. Note. —The Point of Command is White's Q 5 as the logistic radii at Q R 4 do not intersect the centre or a vertex of the geometric symbol. Note. — The white King cannot move to Q 4 nor to K 3, on account of the resistance of the black pieces. But White wins, as the latter do not command K 4.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940011955525
Publisher:
OGB
Publication date:
12/23/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

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12 BASIC PROPOSITIONS OF MAJOR TACTICS FOR CHESS 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
DocFox More than 1 year ago
It starts by explaining what a simple fork is and why it works mathematically. It moves on to much more complex multi-piece diagrams and shows what a piece can capture and when a piece is fully protected. It uses Geometric postulates and Algebraic proofs to show why a piece is protect or not -- including x-ray formations and more. The end of the book shows the rule of the square for whether a pawn can "queen" when the side opposite only has a king. Then it takes that concept a bit further. It is an amazing book for those who understand geometry and algebra well. It open my eyes to several things I now apply at the board. If math is not your "thing" avoid this book. You would most likely get nothing but frustration from it!
negrito More than 1 year ago
Gghhh