12 Steps to Self-Parenting for Adult Children

12 Steps to Self-Parenting for Adult Children

2.5 2
by Ph.D. O'Gorman, Philip Oliver-Diaz, Patricia O'Gormand
     
 

If you are the child of an alcoholic or an adult who has experienced trauma in childhood, you can give yourself a second chance for intimacy, fulfillment and joy by self-parenting.

12 Steps to Self-Parenting, based on the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, will guide you to nurture your inner child so that it may grow into healthy self acceptance.

Overview

If you are the child of an alcoholic or an adult who has experienced trauma in childhood, you can give yourself a second chance for intimacy, fulfillment and joy by self-parenting.

12 Steps to Self-Parenting, based on the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous, will guide you to nurture your inner child so that it may grow into healthy self acceptance.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780932194688
Publisher:
Health Communications, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/28/1988
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
748,849
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 5.50(h) x 0.34(d)

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12 Steps to Self-Parenting for Adult Children 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I joined a self-help group for children of adult alcoholics, and this was the main text for the meetings. I found it enormously helpful in identifying and mastering my injurious behaviors.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found it highly irresponsible of the authors to mislead readers regarding the content of the book. Attracting those who are interested in a psychology-based guide to self-empowerment and recovery, they use the opportunity to spread their personal religious philosophies. There is some insight into past behavior, but there are no constructive, practical exercises or guidance to overcome past traumas other than to trust and believe in God. Now, I do believe in God. But I believe He gives us opportunities and it is our responsibility to help ourselves. Sitting around believing that He loves me is not going to help me develop the psychological skills needed to get past habits developed out of defense mechanisms of a painful childhood. The message of this book to give up control to God is hardly a message of empowerment. It is when we realize that we DO have control over our lives that we learn how to become responsible for our own happiness. It takes being proactive and believing in YOURSELF. The authors seem completely out-of-touch with the realities of how children respond to a traumatic home environment, believing we all grew up trying to simply control everything in our lives. Authors, do some research. Readers, look elsewhere for advice.