The 120 Days of Sodom and Other Writings [NOOK Book]

Overview


The Marquis de Sade, vilified by respectable society from his own time through ours, apotheosized by Apollinaire as "the freest spirit tht has yet existed, " wrote "The 120 Days of Sodom" while imprisoned in the Bastille. An exhaustive catalogue of sexual aberrations and the first systematic exploration -- a hundred years before Krafft-Ebing and Freud -- of the psychopathology of sex, it is considered Sade's crowning achievement and the cornerstone of his thought. Lost after the storming of the Bastille in 1789,...
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The 120 Days of Sodom and Other Writings

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Overview


The Marquis de Sade, vilified by respectable society from his own time through ours, apotheosized by Apollinaire as "the freest spirit tht has yet existed, " wrote "The 120 Days of Sodom" while imprisoned in the Bastille. An exhaustive catalogue of sexual aberrations and the first systematic exploration -- a hundred years before Krafft-Ebing and Freud -- of the psychopathology of sex, it is considered Sade's crowning achievement and the cornerstone of his thought. Lost after the storming of the Bastille in 1789, it was later retrieved but remained unpublished until 1935.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802199034
  • Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 12/1/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 799
  • Sales rank: 893,593
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


Austryn Wainhouse
Wainhouse is the founder of The Marlboro Press, and has translated the works of the Marquis de Sade and Simone de Beauvoir, among others.

Pierre Klossowski
Klossowski, brother of the painter Balthus, is widely recognized as a central figure in the contemporary French avant-garde.

Simone de Beauvoir de Beauvoir is best known for her existentialist and feminist writing.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 9 )
Rating Distribution

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(3)

4 Star

(3)

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 13, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Don't Judge a Book by Its Author

    So, the Marquis is knee-jerk hated by many people. I mean, after all, someone attached him to the term "sadism". However, it's time for you to make up your own mind.

    I finally picked this up due to the Camille Paglia's recommendation in her equally astounding book "Sexual Personae". I mean, I like French philosophers, et al, so I knew who he was and his basic context, but she convinced me that his writing was largely misunderstood. I now agree.

    This particular edition has a couple of excellent essays at the beginning, including "Must We Burn Sade?" by Simone de Beauvoir, in which she is writing at her meticulous, lucid best. It sets you up to intelligently grapple with what you're about to encounter.

    Sade was a fascinating, broken, visionary, pathetic, transcendent man. He had a singular vision and pursued it in the face of horrendous difficulties, many of which he encouraged. His subject matter, though distasteful to some, is a perfectly valid expression of one side of the human psyche.

    Give it due attention, and you just might end up understanding yourself better.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2003

    5

    Concerning, '120 Days of Sodom', it seems, to me, the first and foremost look at perversity to such an extent. It is much like a narrative look into Richard Von Krafft-Ebing's, 'Psychopathia Sexualis', which was written a century later. Sigmund Freud's, 'Three Theory's on Sexuality', simply spells prospects out bluntly, but I believe, he was tainted in the sexual aspect, himself. In, 'Ernestine', the Marquis gives us an interesting view on the philosophy of capital punishment and on that of forgiveness. You will find true horror in this encapsulating novella, however, there is found solace in beauty. The Balance is well ascertained. 'Oxtiern' was a broken-glass version of, 'Ernestine', in play form, with an alternate ending. 'Ernestine', is one of my favorite novellas' of all time.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2001

    wow....

    I knew that the Marquis was one disturbed individual, but the whole idea of sadism and twisted imagination was reborn in my mind after reading the 120 Days Of Sodom. The story was incredible. When I saw the movie Quills, (an excellent movie) I somewhat got an idea of why the Marquis was the way he was, but I was still wondering. After reading the passage of 'Must We Burn Sade?' by Simone de Beauvoir, I have an even better concept of why. In the future, I hope to get my hands on Justine and The Crimes Of Love. Until then, I will amuse myself with Oxitern. Keep on reading people!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2001

    NC-17

    One of the most controversial novels ever written, DAYS explores exactly 120 days in the perverted, twisted lives of four Aristocrats and their cult of sex slaves; many of whome are the very low lifes of both Sade's times and ours. Easy to follow yet the Introduction to each character is a bit on the dull side, things pick up in the first chapter entitled 'The First Day' where one of our Aristocrats measures himself to that of a young girl then proceeds to ____ you get the idea. Not for all tastes but if you like to read something for fun or to see the poetic beauty of a man convicted of free speech 100 years before Freud, then buy 120 Days and enjoy. If not, steer clear!Also included in this book is Sade's play 'Oxteriern' and his novella 'Ernestine' which I'm looking forward to reading and two very good explorations of the Marquis de Sade.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted September 15, 2012

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    Posted December 30, 2009

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