125 Best Ice Cream Recipes

Overview

Nothing quite captures the essence of summer like the frosty pleasure of ice creams, sorbets and gelatos. These delectable and tempting desserts are remarkably easy to make at home year-round. With 125 Best Ice Cream Recipes and your own ice cream maker, you'll have everything you need to make perfect frozen deserts.

Here are just some of the luscious recipes you can create: Chocolate Hazelnut Ice Cream, Dulce de Leche Ice Cream, Caf? au Lait Ice Cream, Old-Fashioned Vanilla Ice...

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Overview

Nothing quite captures the essence of summer like the frosty pleasure of ice creams, sorbets and gelatos. These delectable and tempting desserts are remarkably easy to make at home year-round. With 125 Best Ice Cream Recipes and your own ice cream maker, you'll have everything you need to make perfect frozen deserts.

Here are just some of the luscious recipes you can create: Chocolate Hazelnut Ice Cream, Dulce de Leche Ice Cream, Café au Lait Ice Cream, Old-Fashioned Vanilla Ice Cream, Banana Toffee Ice Cream, Cookies and Cream Ice Cream, Cherries and Cream Ice Cream, Chocolate Chip Coffee Gelato, Pear Ginger Ricotta Gelato, Watermelon Mint Ice, Papaya Ice, Kiwi Banana Lime
Ice
, Tequila Orange Granita.

  • Includes recpies for gelatos, ices, sorbets, granitas, frozen yogurts and ice milks
  • Tips for purchasing the ice cream maker that best suits your needs
  • Features a dozen sauce recipes

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Editorial Reviews

Appleton Post-Crescent - Myrna Collins
Eating ice cream that is rich, creamy and freshly made is an experience separate and apart from eating even the finest of store-bought.
Log and Timber Style
Scrumptious list of this irresistible treats.
Tuscon Citizen - Larry Cox
A cool collection that is highly recommended.
Chocolatier - Carrie Andalora
A fine collection of all things frozen... unique flavor ideas that don't disappoint.
Chicago Sun-Times
Emphasize(s] that you can indulge your own tastes, or meet special dietary needs from the variety of recipes available.
Boston Herald - Clara Silverstein
A good choice for beginners... the variety of recipes makes the book useful to almost anyone.
Nashville Tennessean - Susan T. Leathers
Be forewarned: Marilyn Linton makes the homemade variety sound so good, so easy — and so much better for you — you may never go back to commercially produced ice cream again.
Advice Sisters - Alison Blackman Dunham
Also from Robert Rose Publishers is The Ice Cream Bible by Marilyn Linton and Tanya Linton. I have an electric ice-cream maker, but I'm tired of the same old flavors. This book has plenty of delicious recipes for traditional ice cream flavors, but it also has ices, sorbets, and granita recipes, and ice creams as varied as lemon dill, Instant Rice Pudding, and even Apple Brown Better ice cream. This book also has color photographs information about ice cream making and equipment, troubleshooting, and drinks and sauces to accompany your ice cream concoctions. The amount of servings is included (not the calories, thank heavens!) and also serving suggestions (that's a nice touch). If you've been thinking about getting an ice cream maker, or yours is sitting neglected on a shelf, get this book, and delight friends and family with truly home-made (and delicious) frozen treats.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780778800620
  • Publisher: Rose, Robert Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/3/2003
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 365,850
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Marylyn Linton is a journalist, author and columnist who has written articles and books on food, lifestyle and health.

Tanya Linton is a television producer and freelance writer on food and design.

This is their first cookbook collaboration.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

  • The History of Ice Cream
  • Ice Cream Makers
  • Other Equipment
  • Perfect Scoops
  • Types of Ice Cream
  • Fat Content
  • A Lot of Air
  • Ingredients
  • Quantity
  • Hygiene and Food Safety
  • Storage
  • How Much Alcohol?
  • Perfect Ice Cream
  • Why Your Ice Cream Won't Freeze and Other Problems

Ice Creams

Gelatos

Ices, Sorbets and Granitas

Drinks and Ice Pops

Low-Fat Ice Milks, Yogurts and Non-Dairy Desserts

Sauces

Index

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Preface

Introduction

Like everyone else in the world, we love ice cream. Not only is it the ultimate comfort food, one that's associated with fond memories of summer vacations and birthday parties, but it's also the ultimate treat, a little luxury that's affordable and easily available virtually anywhere in the world today. Thanks to various ice cream makers that are now on the market, it's also the ideal food to make at home.

While each commercial manufacturer boasts dozens of flavors, we discovered to our delight that our made-at-home list was virtually limitless. The smaller batches produced in home ice cream makers get your creative juices flowing by inviting frequent experimentation. In trying everything from Apple Brown Betty Ice Cream (see recipe, page 24) to Beet Apple Slush (see recipe, page 121), we found — as we're sure you will — that inventing new flavor combinations is half the fun.

And because home ice cream makers incorporate less air into the mixture during the churning process than traditional big-batch commercial machines do, you're sure to get an ice cream that's creamier and fresher than store-bought. Ice cream was always meant to be eaten fresh, and there are some ice cream aficionados who believe that storing it in the freezer compromises the flavor. We found that keeping it in the freezer for several days or even a week or two doesn't detract from the flavor too much, but nothing beats the taste of ice cream straight out of the machine or just a few hours old.

We think one of the reasons why ice cream makers are increasingly popular is that more and more of us are concerned about the components of our food. Homemade ice cream and its cousins — sherbets and ices — are about as wholesome as you can get. Not only do you start with the freshest eggs, milk, fruit and/or flavorings, but also, because you select them, you can make sure the ingredients are exactly what you want.

You can make it organic if that's important, low-fat if weight or cholesterol is an issue, or nut-free if allergies are a concern. Healthwise, ice cream, though it is about 14% fat, is a good source of both protein and calcium — the latter is essential for building and maintaining healthy bones in all of us, whatever our age. As well, most North American supermarkets now carry a good range of low-fat dairy (and non-dairy) products that decrease fat content without sacrificing taste. (Frozen yogurt, introduced in the 1970s and perceived by some as healthier than regular ice cream, is also a make-at-home option, particularly since the flavors available at the supermarket are still limited.) In each of our recipes, you are building your ice cream from the ground up, not relying on a commercial mix (even many ice cream shops that claim to make their own start from a mix).

We also found that ice cream is no longer confined to traditional flavors or enjoyed only in a sugar cone after dinner. In our ice cream travels, we learned that the sky's the limit as far as flavors go (the Roasted Garlic Ice Cream on page 94 is surprisingly good) and that ice cream isn't just a dessert (our healthy Tomato Basil Ice on page 147 makes that clear, as does one of our favorite breakfasts, waffles with Banana Ice Cream, on page 28). Our serving suggestions will show you how to enhance your ice cream to fit into a party theme or mood.

That ice cream is such a simple food belies the fact that, sciencewise, it's a complex structure of ice crystals and fat globules. When conditions are right, they combine to make a frozen mixture with good émouth feelé to it — that is, a smooth, consistent texture rather than a coarse, grainy one. In our recipes, we provide the proper ratios of ingredients needed to achieve this, while leaving a little room for your improvisation.

In writing this book, we discovered that homemade ice cream, when served to guests, can be more impressive than the fanciest cakes and tarts. Its appeal is universal, and it delights all ages and at all life stages. Kids are fascinated by the process of making homemade ice cream, and unlike other forms of cooking, in which sharp knives and hot stoves are a constant worry, managing an ice cream recipe is a relatively simple, anxiety-free task that kids and adults can share. After all, the ingredients are few, the cooking steps straightforward and the end result is quickly achieved. We hop you and your family and friends will enjoy these recipes and that they'll give you the foundation and confidence to go on and create more of your own delicious flavors. Enjoy.

Marilyn and Tanya Linton

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

Like everyone else in the world, we love ice cream. Not only is it the ultimate comfort food, one that's associated with fond memories of summer vacations and birthday parties, but it's also the ultimate treat, a little luxury that's affordable and easily available virtually anywhere in the world today. Thanks to various ice cream makers that are now on the market, it's also the ideal food to make at home.

While each commercial manufacturer boasts dozens of flavors, we discovered to our delight that our made-at-home list was virtually limitless. The smaller batches produced in home ice cream makers get your creative juices flowing by inviting frequent experimentation. In trying everything from Apple Brown Betty Ice Cream (see recipe, page 24) to Beet Apple Slush (see recipe, page 121), we found -- as we're sure you will -- that inventing new flavor combinations is half the fun.

And because home ice cream makers incorporate less air into the mixture during the churning process than traditional big-batch commercial machines do, you're sure to get an ice cream that's creamier and fresher than store-bought. Ice cream was always meant to be eaten fresh, and there are some ice cream aficionados who believe that storing it in the freezer compromises the flavor. We found that keeping it in the freezer for several days or even a week or two doesn't detract from the flavor too much, but nothing beats the taste of ice cream straight out of the machine or just a few hours old.

We think one of the reasons why ice cream makers are increasingly popular is that more and more of us are concerned about the components of our food. Homemade ice cream and its cousins --sherbets and ices -- are about as wholesome as you can get. Not only do you start with the freshest eggs, milk, fruit and/or flavorings, but also, because you select them, you can make sure the ingredients are exactly what you want.

You can make it organic if that's important, low-fat if weight or cholesterol is an issue, or nut-free if allergies are a concern. Healthwise, ice cream, though it is about 14% fat, is a good source of both protein and calcium -- the latter is essential for building and maintaining healthy bones in all of us, whatever our age. As well, most North American supermarkets now carry a good range of low-fat dairy (and non-dairy) products that decrease fat content without sacrificing taste. (Frozen yogurt, introduced in the 1970s and perceived by some as healthier than regular ice cream, is also a make-at-home option, particularly since the flavors available at the supermarket are still limited.) In each of our recipes, you are building your ice cream from the ground up, not relying on a commercial mix (even many ice cream shops that claim to make their own start from a mix).

We also found that ice cream is no longer confined to traditional flavors or enjoyed only in a sugar cone after dinner. In our ice cream travels, we learned that the sky's the limit as far as flavors go (the Roasted Garlic Ice Cream on page 94 is surprisingly good) and that ice cream isn't just a dessert (our healthy Tomato Basil Ice on page 147 makes that clear, as does one of our favorite breakfasts, waffles with Banana Ice Cream, on page 28). Our serving suggestions will show you how to enhance your ice cream to fit into a party theme or mood.

That ice cream is such a simple food belies the fact that, sciencewise, it's a complex structure of ice crystals and fat globules. When conditions are right, they combine to make a frozen mixture with good émouth feelé to it -- that is, a smooth, consistent texture rather than a coarse, grainy one. In our recipes, we provide the proper ratios of ingredients needed to achieve this, while leaving a little room for your improvisation.

In writing this book, we discovered that homemade ice cream, when served to guests, can be more impressive than the fanciest cakes and tarts. Its appeal is universal, and it delights all ages and at all life stages. Kids are fascinated by the process of making homemade ice cream, and unlike other forms of cooking, in which sharp knives and hot stoves are a constant worry, managing an ice cream recipe is a relatively simple, anxiety-free task that kids and adults can share. After all, the ingredients are few, the cooking steps straightforward and the end result is quickly achieved. We hop you and your family and friends will enjoy these recipes and that they'll give you the foundation and confidence to go on and create more of your own delicious flavors. Enjoy.

Marilyn and Tanya Linton

Read More Show Less

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