125 Best Vegetarian Recipes

Overview

Fabulous vegetarian dishes for healthy eating.

This book of tasty vegetable recipes is for anyone who enjoys good eating. With 125 Best Vegetarian Recipes, any cook can create fast and easy magic in the kitchen. Featuring exquisite yet simple recipes, this book is a guide to enjoying all the benefits of ...

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Overview

Fabulous vegetarian dishes for healthy eating.

This book of tasty vegetable recipes is for anyone who enjoys good eating. With 125 Best Vegetarian Recipes, any cook can create fast and easy magic in the kitchen. Featuring exquisite yet simple recipes, this book is a guide to enjoying all the benefits of mouthwatering vegetarian meals.

A few of the innovative combinations of flavors and textures included are:

  • Insalata Caprese
  • Avocado Soup with Fried Tortillas and Salsa
  • Asian Spring Rolls
  • Vegetable Goat Cheese Pie with an Olive Oil Crust Dome
  • Leek-Potato-Lentil Pie
  • Rapini with Balsamic Vinegar
  • Marion's Almond-Chocolate Torte
  • Chocolate Fondue

There is also sound advice on meal preparation and ingredient selections — even a supplementary index listing for those following a strictly vegan diet. 125 Best Vegetarian Recipes is a go-to cookbook in kitchens where good health and great-tasting food are equally important.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780778800897
  • Publisher: Rose, Robert Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/6/2004
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 1,457,000
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Byron Ayanoglu is a restaurant critic, food writer, and novelist.

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Read an Excerpt

The New Vegetarian

The discovery of a new dish does more for human happiness than the discovery of a star
-- Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

The olive tree is surely the richest tree of heaven.
-- Thomas Jefferson

Vegetarian cookery is for everyone. It's what makes even everyday meals joyful and memorable. Color, texture, flavor, and infinite adaptability are just some of the extra benefits of non-meat edibles, rendering their healthful, low-calorie aspects almost a bonus. The recipes in this book will delight and nourish you, be they the substance of a vegetarian meal, or the supporting players of a meat-based spread.

Strict vegetarianism -- and, by association, vegetable cookery --has been so politicized that it sometimes appears to have nothing to do with the kitchen and the dining table. For some people, vegetarianism is revered as a global panacea -- the solution to every imaginable health problem, environmental concern, or political injustice. For others, it is anathema, the very word "vegetarian" an affront to their perceived First-World birthright to three "square" (read "meat") meals a day.

This controversy is hardly surprising when we consider the spotty history of vegetarianism in North America. In the 1950s, meat abstainers were viewed if not with outright suspicion, then at least with condescension. The alternate lifestylers of the 1960s changed all that, but at a price. As with all the other "inventions" of that most unusual decade, vegetarianism turned militant, intolerant, and holier-than-thou. And just to prove the point, sixties-typevegetarians developed intentionally dour recipes, based on misapplied, Japanese, macrobiotic philosophy -- which is great for meditating on a serene mountain; not so great for surviving polluted, stressful urban environments.

And so this ludicrous polarity of vegetarians and their opponents -- a situation of epic culinary fanaticism that confoundedly excludes both sides from the treasures and the unmitigated pleasures of lovingly prepared vegetables.

For Mediterranean types like me -- indeed, for anyone who was raised in the world's sunnier (if poorer) climes -- vegetables, legumes and grains have no ideological connotations. They are simply the essence of everyday eating. During my formative years as a lower-middle class Greek in Istanbul, meat was a luxury, something reserved for Sundays and other holidays. Otherwise, we ate an extensive and highly inventive vegetarian diet, though we didn't know it as such. And even when small potions of meat did make their rare appearances, they were always accompanied by a slew of vegetable dishes. The North American standard of a 20-ounce steak, accompanied by a lonely potato and a watery salad, was something I encountered only when I first came to these shores.

Still, old habits are hard to kick. I've certainly eaten a lot of meat, poultry and fish over my last 38 years in the New World, but I've never lost my love for vegetables. I still cherish those that I ate from my mother's kitchen. In addition, my celebratory feasts now include the multitude of vegetable dishes I've tasted, recreated and adapted during three decades of travelling-to-eat, writing about food, and feeding thousands of happy customers in my various catering and restaurant businesses. Sample them for yourself. They just might change your ideas about vegetarian cooking forever.

Bon Appetit.

Byron Ayanoglu
Montréal, 2003

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
The New Vegetarian
The Happy Vegetarian Kitchen
Vegetarian Essentials

Appetizers

  • Kopanisti (Feta Cheese Dip)
  • Melizzano Despina (Eggplant Dip #1)
  • Baked Goat Cheese
  • Goat Cheese Byzza
  • Pyzza Puttanesca
  • Potato Byzza
  • Goat Cheese Phyllo Nests with Cashews
  • Mint Feta Phyllo Nests
  • Individual Asparagus and Goat Cheese Flan
  • Fried Zucchini
  • Zucchini Croquettes with Yogurt Salad
  • Olive Oil Crostini
  • Braised Endive and Tomato Gratinée
  • Mini Savory Crêpes
  • Tortilla Espangnola (Potato Omelette)
  • Asian
    Spring Rolls
  • Wild Spring Rolls
  • Quesadilla
  • Yam Quesadilla
Soups
  • Vegetable Stock
  • Avgolemono-Rice Soup
  • Avocado Soup
  • Mushroom Stock
  • Clear Mushroom Soup
  • Lentil Soup Italian-Style
  • French Vegetable Soup
  • Veggie Onion Soup
  • Fassolada (Greek Bean Soup)
Salads
  • Greek Winter Salad
  • Greek Summer Salad
  • Greek Bean Salad
  • Garlic Beets
  • Tabbouleh
  • Insalata Caprese
  • Roasted Peppers Antipasto
  • Marinated Mushrooms
  • Portobello Mushrooms with Goat Cheese
  • Sautéed Eggplant Salad
  • Eggplant with Mint
  • French Potato Salad
  • Avocado Salad
  • Avocado Melissa Sue Anderson
  • Lentil and Beet Salad
  • Green and Yellow Salad
  • Sautéed Mushrooms on Wilted Greens
  • Mango-Cucumber Salad
  • Yam and Pecan Salad
  • Don Don Noodles
  • Itanbul Leeks
  • Summer Artichoke Salad
  • Danialie's "Little" Cauliflower Salad
  • Moroccan Grapefruit and Olive Salad
Vegetable Side Dishes
  • Rapini with Balsamic Vinegar
  • Stir-Fried Red Cabbage
  • Jalapeño
    Broccoli
  • "Little" Broccoli Gratin
  • Bitter Breens with Paprika
  • Caraway Carrots
  • Fennel Mushroom Stir-Fry
  • Cauliflower and Red Pepper
  • Wild Mushroom Fricassee with Rosemary
  • Stewed Ckra
  • Grilled Eggplant with Goat Cheese
  • Summer Zucchini
  • Zucchini Algis
  • Green Beans with Cashews
  • Green Beans and Tomato
  • Mushroom and Green Bean Stir Fry
  • Braided Green Beans and Fennel
  • Herbed Potatoes
  • Grilled Leek with Feta and Red Pepper
  • Potato and Leek Avgolemono
  • Romano Bean Stew
  • Yahni (Greek Beans with Onions)
  • Mushrooms
    Provençale
  • Lentils-Rice-Spinach
  • Spinach Florentine
Dishes for Entertaining
  • Olive Oil Crust
  • Spinach Feta Pie
  • Individual Vegetable Goat Cheese Pie
  • Leek-Potato-Lentil Pie
  • Eggplant and Mushroom Pie
  • Individual Stuffed Eggplant
  • Judi's Enchiladas
  • Cauliflower Pea Curry
  • Individual Broccoli Ricotta Pie
  • Chickpea Tofu Stew
  • Spinach Dal
  • Vegetarian Moussaka Pie
Pasta, Polenta & Rice
  • Tomato Sauce
  • Spaghettini with Capers
  • Linguine Barolo
  • Fusilli with Leeks
  • Fettuccine with Fennel and Artichokes
  • Penne with Eggplant and Mushrooms
  • Pasta with Coriander Pesto and Peppers
  • Mushroom-Spinach Lasagna with Goat Cheese
  • Baked Orzo and Beans
  • Mumaliga (Romanian Polenta)
  • Polenta with Fried Tomato
  • Three-Cheese Polenta
  • Eggplant Pilaf
  • Mushroom Risotto
  • Levantine Rice
Sauces and Condiments
  • Hot Oil
  • Vinaigrette
  • Aïoli (Garlic Mayonnaise)
  • Sesame Dressing
  • Pico de Gallo (Mexican Hot Sauce)
  • Salsa Cynthia
  • Tzatziki Sauce
  • Cucumber Raita
  • Mango
    Raita
Desserts
  • Baked Ricotta Meenakshi
  • Wrenn's Ricotta Pie
  • Individual Apple Strudel
  • Marion's Almond-Chocolate Torte
  • Aristedes' Bougatsa
  • Hazelnut Baklava
  • Walnut-Chocolate Baklava
  • Fried Pineapple
  • Chocolate Fondue
  • Baked Peaches with Almond Crust
  • Walnut Raisin Cake
  • Greek Honey Cake
  • Almond Hazelnut Cake

Index


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Preface

The New Vegetarian

The discovery of a new dish does more for human happiness than the discovery of a star
— Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

The olive tree is surely the richest tree of heaven.
— Thomas Jefferson

Vegetarian cookery is for everyone. It's what makes even everyday meals joyful and memorable. Color, texture, flavor, and infinite adaptability are just some of the extra benefits of non-meat edibles, rendering their healthful, low-calorie aspects almost a bonus. The recipes in this book will delight and nourish you, be they the substance of a vegetarian meal, or the supporting players of a meat-based spread.

Strict vegetarianism — and, by association, vegetable cookery —has been so politicized that it sometimes appears to have nothing to do with the kitchen and the dining table. For some people, vegetarianism is revered as a global panacea — the solution to every imaginable health problem, environmental concern, or political injustice. For others, it is anathema, the very word "vegetarian" an affront to their perceived First-World birthright to three "square" (read "meat") meals a day.

This controversy is hardly surprising when we consider the spotty history of vegetarianism in North America. In the 1950s, meat abstainers were viewed if not with outright suspicion, then at least with condescension. The alternate lifestylers of the 1960s changed all that, but at a price. As with all the other "inventions" of that most unusual decade, vegetarianism turned militant, intolerant, and holier-than-thou. And just to prove the point, sixties-type vegetarians developed intentionally dour recipes, based on misapplied, Japanese, macrobiotic philosophy — which is great for meditating on a serene mountain; not so great for surviving polluted, stressful urban environments.

And so this ludicrous polarity of vegetarians and their opponents — a situation of epic culinary fanaticism that confoundedly excludes both sides from the treasures and the unmitigated pleasures of lovingly prepared vegetables.

For Mediterranean types like me — indeed, for anyone who was raised in the world's sunnier (if poorer) climes — vegetables, legumes and grains have no ideological connotations. They are simply the essence of everyday eating. During my formative years as a lower-middle class Greek in Istanbul, meat was a luxury, something reserved for Sundays and other holidays. Otherwise, we ate an extensive and highly inventive vegetarian diet, though we didn't know it as such. And even when small potions of meat did make their rare appearances, they were always accompanied by a slew of vegetable dishes. The North American standard of a
20-ounce steak, accompanied by a lonely potato and a watery salad, was something I encountered only when I first came to these shores.

Still, old habits are hard to kick. I've certainly eaten a lot of meat, poultry and fish over my last 38 years in the New World, but I've never lost my love for vegetables. I still cherish those that I ate from my mother's kitchen. In addition, my celebratory feasts now include the multitude of vegetable dishes I've tasted, recreated and adapted during three decades of travelling-to-eat, writing about food, and feeding thousands of happy customers in my various catering and restaurant businesses. Sample them for yourself. They just might change your ideas about vegetarian cooking forever.

Bon Appetit.

Byron Ayanoglu
Montréal, 2003

Read More Show Less

Introduction

The New Vegetarian

The discovery of a new dish does more for human happiness than the discovery of a star
-- Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

The olive tree is surely the richest tree of heaven.
-- Thomas Jefferson

Vegetarian cookery is for everyone. It's what makes even everyday meals joyful and memorable. Color, texture, flavor, and infinite adaptability are just some of the extra benefits of non-meat edibles, rendering their healthful, low-calorie aspects almost a bonus. The recipes in this book will delight and nourish you, be they the substance of a vegetarian meal, or the supporting players of a meat-based spread.

Strict vegetarianism -- and, by association, vegetable cookery --has been so politicized that it sometimes appears to have nothing to do with the kitchen and the dining table. For some people, vegetarianism is revered as a global panacea -- the solution to every imaginable health problem, environmental concern, or political injustice. For others, it is anathema, the very word "vegetarian" an affront to their perceived First-World birthright to three "square" (read "meat") meals a day.

This controversy is hardly surprising when we consider the spotty history of vegetarianism in North America. In the 1950s, meat abstainers were viewed if not with outright suspicion, then at least with condescension. The alternate lifestylers of the 1960s changed all that, but at a price. As with all the other "inventions" of that most unusual decade, vegetarianism turned militant, intolerant, and holier-than-thou. And just to prove the point, sixties-type vegetarians developedintentionally dour recipes, based on misapplied, Japanese, macrobiotic philosophy -- which is great for meditating on a serene mountain; not so great for surviving polluted, stressful urban environments.

And so this ludicrous polarity of vegetarians and their opponents -- a situation of epic culinary fanaticism that confoundedly excludes both sides from the treasures and the unmitigated pleasures of lovingly prepared vegetables.

For Mediterranean types like me -- indeed, for anyone who was raised in the world's sunnier (if poorer) climes -- vegetables, legumes and grains have no ideological connotations. They are simply the essence of everyday eating. During my formative years as a lower-middle class Greek in Istanbul, meat was a luxury, something reserved for Sundays and other holidays. Otherwise, we ate an extensive and highly inventive vegetarian diet, though we didn't know it as such. And even when small potions of meat did make their rare appearances, they were always accompanied by a slew of vegetable dishes. The North American standard of a 20-ounce steak, accompanied by a lonely potato and a watery salad, was something I encountered only when I first came to these shores.

Still, old habits are hard to kick. I've certainly eaten a lot of meat, poultry and fish over my last 38 years in the New World, but I've never lost my love for vegetables. I still cherish those that I ate from my mother's kitchen. In addition, my celebratory feasts now include the multitude of vegetable dishes I've tasted, recreated and adapted during three decades of travelling-to-eat, writing about food, and feeding thousands of happy customers in my various catering and restaurant businesses. Sample them for yourself. They just might change your ideas about vegetarian cooking forever.

Bon Appetit.

Byron Ayanoglu
Montréal, 2003

Read More Show Less

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