13 Treasures (13 Treasures Trilogy Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Tanya is no ordinary girl. She can see fairies. But not the fairies we imagine. Evil fairies who cast spells on her, rousing her from her sleep and propelling her out of bed. At wit's end with her daughter's inexplicable behavior, Tanya's mother sends her away to live with her grandmother at Elvesden Manor, a secluded countryside mansion on the outskirts of a peculiar Essex town.

There is plenty to explore, as long as Tanya stays away from ...
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13 Treasures (13 Treasures Trilogy Series #1)

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Overview

Tanya is no ordinary girl. She can see fairies. But not the fairies we imagine. Evil fairies who cast spells on her, rousing her from her sleep and propelling her out of bed. At wit's end with her daughter's inexplicable behavior, Tanya's mother sends her away to live with her grandmother at Elvesden Manor, a secluded countryside mansion on the outskirts of a peculiar Essex town.

There is plenty to explore, as long as Tanya stays away from Hangman's Wood- a vast stretch of forest, full of catacombs and notorious for people losing their lives. Fifty years ago a girl vanished in the woods, a girl Tanya's grandmother will not speak of. As Tanya learns more about this girl, she finds herself dangerously close to vanishing into the fairy realm forever.

Debut author Michelle Harrison weaves an intricate mystery into a beautiful and haunting fantasy that captures a rich world of fairy lore where only the color red can offer protection.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this sprightly contemporary fantasy, 13-year-old Tanya has second sight and has been bedeviled her whole life by fairies only she can see. Blamed by her mother for the fairies' pranks, Tanya is shipped off to visit her cold and distant grandmother at isolated, fey-infested Elvesden Manor, an archetypally ancient, ivy-covered mansion abutting mystical wilderness. Aided by Fabian, the smart-aleck son of her grandmother's groundskeeper; Mad Morag, an ancient gypsy; and Red, a girl wanted by the police for kidnapping a changeling, Tanya becomes enmeshed in a decades-old mystery. For many years children have disappeared from the nearby town, supposedly lost in the woods or down in the dangerous catacombs, but only Tanya guesses that malicious fairies may be involved, a discovery that places Tanya in terrible danger. First-time novelist Harrison writes with great assuredness, creating a seductive setting and memorable, fully developed characters. Tanya is a believable and decidedly imperfect heroine, and Fabian is an enjoyably eccentric if occasionally obnoxious sidekick. It's an excellent choice for fans of the Spiderwick Chronicles and other modern-day fairy tales. Ages 8-12. (Apr.)
Kirkus Reviews
Packed off to her unwelcoming grandmother's house, 13-year-old Tanya faces an unpleasant summer, tormented by fairies only she can see and urged by Fabian, the groundskeeper's son, to explore the forbidden woods to solve the mystery of a child's disappearance. It takes a while for all the facets of this mystery to be displayed, but by the time Tanya realizes that the "ghost" she and Fabian saw in the woods is the same young woman Fabian's grandfather was suspected of murdering, the reader will be hooked. Then the sounds Tanya hears in the walls behind her room turn out to be another teenager with second sight, one who has been stealing, or perhaps rescuing, babies. And what is the meaning of the 13 charms on the heirloom bracelet? In spite of some awkward writing and weak character development, there is much to enjoy here for the fan of English fantasies involving old manor houses, fairy kingdoms and changelings. This debut novel won the Waterstone Children's Book Prize, and a sequel appeared in the United Kingdom in January 2010. (Gothic fantasy. 10-14)
From the Publisher
* "First-time novelist Harrison writes with great assuredness, creating a seductive setting and memorable, fully developed characters."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

* "An intriguing, exciting blend of fantasy and mystery...This truly absorbing page-turner is fresh and clever, and readers will be on the edge of their seats wondering if and how Tanya will outwit her nemeses."—School Library Journal, starred review

"Harrison is an excellent storyteller whose command of language wonderfully matches the scenarios and characters she creates...Fantasy readers who are looking for the next fat book that's both a quick and compelling read will love this one."—Booklist

"Fantasy fans will find the dizzying array of otherworldly creatures, each kind equipped with its own social hierarchies and mores, quite intriguing...[has a] swift pace, compelling characters (both human and otherwise), and web of carefully developed and cleanly resolved plots."—BCCB

Booklist
"Harrison is an excellent storyteller whose command of language wonderfully matches the scenarios and characters she creates...Fantasy readers who are looking for the next fat book that's both a quick and compelling read will love this one."
BCCB
"Fantasy fans will find the dizzying array of otherworldly creatures, each kind equipped with its own social hierarchies and mores, quite intriguing...[has a] swift pace, compelling characters (both human and otherwise), and web of carefully developed and cleanly resolved plots."
Children's Literature - Lauri Berkenkamp
Tanya is a thirteen year-old with a big problem: she can see fairies, but they are invisible to everyone else. Her mother thinks the strange things that happen to Tanya are simply her way of getting attention, but Tanya is constantly plagued by naughty fairies doing whatever they can to get her into trouble. After one particularly bad incident, Tanya is sent to her grandmother's house, Elvesden Manor, a crumbling mansion deep in the woods of rural England. Tanya's relationship with her grandmother is rocky, and Tanya knows her grandmother doesn't want her staying at Elvesden Manor. When Tanya and the gamekeeper's son, Fabian, get lost in the deep woods surrounding the manor searching for Tanya's dog, Oberon, they discover a mysterious young girl who disappears when Fabian's angry father finds them. Tanya and Fabian discover through an old photograph and news clipping that the young girl they met in the woods is the same young girl who went missing fifty years before, and they set out on adventure that takes them into the dark, mysterious woods and the forbidden world of fairy magic with dangerous and deadly consequences. Geared to middle grade readers, this novel combines English fairy lore, folk tales, and woods magic with a classic mystery, complete with a crumbling manor, mysterious passages, missing letters, and secret charms. The plot is occasionally uneven, and a few threads of the mystery are never fully resolved, but the book is fascinating and very engaging and will likely appeal not only to fans of fantasy but to mystery and adventures lovers as well. Reviewer: Lauri Berkenkamp
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—An intriguing, exciting blend of fantasy and mystery. Tanya, 13, is being tormented by bullying fairies no one else can see. Fed up with her odd behavior, her mother sends her to her unwelcoming grandmother at her dark manor house surrounded by a forest that Tanya is forbidden to enter. When children begin to disappear, she realizes that it is up to her, along with the caretaker's son, Fabian, to go into Hangman's Wood and find the truth. There she encounters a girl who disappeared 50 years earlier, and who Fabian's grandfather was accused of murdering. It will take more than courage for her to accomplish her mission, for Tanya must use the one gift she possesses that she wishes she didn't have—the ability to enter the fairies' realm—and she almost loses her life in the process. This truly absorbing page-turner is fresh and clever, and readers will be on the edge of their seats wondering if and how Tanya will outwit her nemeses.—Kathy Kirchoefer, Prince Georges County Memorial Library System, New Carrollton, MD
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316088770
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 4/12/2010
  • Series: 13 Treasures Trilogy Series , #1
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 113,576
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Michelle Harrison is a British author and illustrator who works as an Editorial Assistant in Oxford UK's children's fiction division. This is her first novel.

Zdenko Basic has illustrated many children's books and articles for children's magazines. In 2006, he won the Sheep in a Box Award for best Croatian picture book for his work on The Story of Chocolate.
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First Chapter

13 Treasures


By Harrison, Michelle

Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Copyright © 2010 Harrison, Michelle
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780316041485

1

She was aware of their presence in the room before she even awoke.

An ominous twitching had begun in Tanya’s eyelids, a sure sign that trouble was on its way. Her eyes opened groggily. As usual, she had reverted to her childhood habit of sleeping with her head under the covers. She was uncomfortable, yet reluctant to shift position. If she did it would alert them to the fact that she was awake.

Beneath the stifling covers, Tanya longed to kick the sheets back and allow the soft summer breeze drifting in through the window to wash over her. She tried to tell herself she had dreamed it; maybe they were not really there after all. Still she lay unmoving—for deep down she knew they were there, as surely as she knew she was the only one who could see them.

Through the covers she could sense them, could feel the air in the room charged with a strange energy. She could even smell the earthy dampness of leaves, fungi, and ripened berries. It was their smell.

A quiet voice cut through the darkness.

“She sleeps. Should I rouse her?”

Tanya stiffened beneath her sanctuary of sheets. She still had the bruises from the last time. They had pinched her black and blue. A sharp prod in the ribs made her gasp.

“She is not asleep.” The second voice was cold, controlled. “She is pretending. No matter. I do so enjoy these little… games.”

The last traces of drowsiness left her then. There was no mistaking the underlying threat in those words. Tanya prepared to throw back the sheets—but they were strangely heavy all of a sudden, weighing down on her—and they were growing steadily heavier.

“What’s happening… what are you doing?”

She clawed at the sheets, frantically trying to push them away. They seemed to be wrapping themselves around her like a cocoon. For one terrifying moment she struggled for breath before managing to free her head and suck in a lungful of cool night air. It was several seconds before she noticed that the glass star lantern covering the bedroom lightbulb was directly in front of her face.

Suddenly, Tanya realized why the bedclothes were so heavy. She was floating in midair, five feet above her bed—supporting the full weight of them.

“Put me down!”

Slowly, through no control of her own, she began turning sideways in the air. The bedclothes promptly slid off and fell to the carpet, leaving Tanya hovering facedown above her bed in her pajamas. Without the shelter of the covers she felt horribly vulnerable. She pulled her hair back from her face and scanned the room. The only living thing she saw in the darkness was the cat: a ridiculous fluffy gray Persian curled in a ball on the windowsill. It got up, giving her a haughty look before turning its back to her and settling down once more.

“Where are you?” she said, her voice shaking. “Show yourselves!”

An unpleasant laugh sounded from somewhere near the bed. Tanya felt herself being propelled forward, and before she knew what was happening she had turned a full somersault in the air, followed by another… and another.

“Just stop it!”

She heard the desperation in her voice and hated it.

The somersaulting stopped and, finally, she landed on her feet—upside down on the ceiling. The curtains billowed weirdly in the breeze. She averted her eyes, trying to steady herself. It was as if gravity had reversed for her only. The blood was not rushing to her head, her pajamas were not falling upward, and her hair was now tumbling down her back.

She sat down on the ceiling, defeated. This was the reason they came in the middle of the night. She had figured that much out a long time ago. At night she was completely at their mercy, whereas in the day, if she happened to be caught in any strange situation, she had a far better chance of passing it off as a game or trick of some kind. Just one of many “games” and “tricks” over the years.

She couldn’t remember the first time she had seen them, exactly. They had always been there. She had grown up chattering away to herself as her parents looked on at first in amusement, then later, with concern.

As the years passed she had learned to lie convincingly. Talk of fairies did not wash well with adults once you were past a certain age. There were no more of the knowing looks and fond smiles that came with infancy. Tanya did not take it too personally. People didn’t believe in what they couldn’t see.

The incidents had become more vindictive of late. It was one thing having to cut out a few tangles after an encounter with an enchanted hairbrush, or finding that the answers to homework had been mysteriously tampered with overnight. But this was serious. For months now, Tanya had harbored a nagging worry that eventually something bad was going to happen, something she couldn’t explain her way out of. Her worst fear was that her increasingly weird behavior would land her on the couch of a psychiatrist.

Floating around in the air was not a good predicament. If her mother awoke to find her walking about on the ceiling, it wouldn’t be a doctor she called—it would be a vicar.

She was in trouble of the worst kind.

There was a waft of cool air on her face, and Tanya felt the brush of feathered wings skim her cheek. A large, black bird swooped at her shoulder, its glittering eyes blinking once before the bird morphed as quickly as a shadow would vanish in the sun. Silken black hair and the pinkish tips of two pointed ears replaced the cruel, curved beak, as a woman not much larger than the bird shifted into its place. She wore a gown of black feathers; it was stark against her ivory skin.

“Raven,” Tanya whispered. She watched as a feather fell from the fairy’s dress and floated lightly to the carpet. “Why are you here?”

Raven did not answer. She alighted at the foot of the bed, next to two small figures, one plump and ruddy-nosed, the other dark-skinned, wiry, and skittish looking. Both were watching her intently. The smaller of the two was the first to speak.

“You’ve been writing about us again.”

Tanya felt her face burn. “I haven’t, Gredin… I didn’t.”

Gredin’s yellow eyes glittered, shockingly bright in contrast to his nut-brown face. “But that’s what you said last time. And the time before.”

Outside, a dark, rectangular object was drifting toward the open window as though carried on the breeze. It soared gracefully through the curtains and into the room, and halted before Tanya’s dismayed face. It was a journal, fairly new and in good condition—but covered in soil. She had buried it beneath the apple tree in the garden that afternoon. How foolish she had been.

“Yours, I believe?” said Gredin.

“I’ve never seen it before.”

The plump little fellow next to Gredin snorted.

“Oh… come now,” he said. “You wouldn’t want to be up there all night, would you?” He reached up and gave the peacock feather in his cap a light stroke, then twisted his ratty moustache around his forefinger. The feather shimmered at his touch, rich with enchantment. The fat little man removed the quill from his cap and gave it a deft flick.

The diary opened, releasing a clod of earth that fell to the floor and broke over one of Tanya’s slippers. A muffled sneeze came from inside the slipper, and then a fourth and final fairy emerged from inside it, hoglike and ugly. The creature beat its ragged brown wings with some effort and landed in a clumsy heap on the bed. After regaining its balance it began scratching vigorously, showering the bedclothes with molting fur and fleas, then gave a cavernous yawn, rubbing its snout with tiny brown paws.

Once, when she was smaller, and before her parents’ divorce, Tanya had been sulking ungraciously after a telling-off. After a few minutes her mother had snapped, “Don’t be such a little Mizhog.”

“What’s a Mizhog?” Tanya asked, curious despite herself.

“It’s a horrible hoggy creature that’s always miserable,” her mother had replied. “And with that face you’re pulling, you look just like one.”

This was something Tanya remembered every time she saw the flea-bitten brown fairy. Its hang-dog expression fit the description of her mother’s invented creature so perfectly that, in her own mind, Tanya would forever think of it as a Mizhog. As the creature, unlike the other fairies, had never put forth a name for itself, the name Tanya had selected stuck.

Aside from its fleas and the smell, which reminded her of a wet dog, the Mizhog was fairly unobtrusive. It never spoke—at least, not in any language Tanya could understand—was always hungry, and had a habit of scratching its belly. Other than that, it seemed happy to observe its surroundings with its soulful brown eyes—the only one of its features that could be described as beautiful. It stared up at her now, wide-eyed and unblinking, making strange little snuffling noises in its throat.

The diary bobbed in front of Tanya’s face. Hastily, she returned her attention to it.

“Read it,” said Gredin.

“I can’t,” said Tanya. “It’s too dark.”

Gredin’s eyes were as hard as flint. The pages of the diary began turning frenziedly, this way and that, as if trying to decide on an entry to settle upon. Eventually they rested on a particularly rushed-looking passage toward the end.

Tanya recognized the date immediately—it was less than two weeks ago. The writing was barely legible; her eyes had been so blurred with tears she had hardly been able to see her own hand. Then the hairs on the back of her neck stood on end as her own voice echoed softly from the pages, not quite loud enough to wake anyone, but certainly loud enough for her to hear. It sounded distant, as though its journey through time had weakened it.

“They came again tonight. Why me? I hate them. HATE them…”

The excruciating passage went on and on, and Tanya could only listen in horror as her voice spilled from the diary, recounting one page after another, angry, frustrated, and hopeless.

The fairies watched her all the while—Raven subdued, Feathercap and Gredin stony-faced, and the Mizhog scratching its flea-infested belly, disinterested.

“Enough,” said Gredin, after what seemed like an age.

Tanya’s voice broke off immediately, leaving only the sound of the pages flicking back and forth, as if by some invisible hand. Before her eyes, every word she had written slowly faded and vanished like ink drawn into blotting paper.

The diary fell to the bed, disintegrating on impact.

“There is nothing to be gained from this,” said Raven, gesturing to what was left of it. “You will bring only misery to yourself.”

“Not if someone had read it one day,” Tanya said bitterly. “And believed me.”

“The rules are simple,” said Feathercap. “You speak of us to no one. If you continue to try then we will continue to punish you.”

The remnants of the diary stirred on the bed, lifting from the covers like fine sand, before flying through the open window out into the night.

“Gone. As if it never was,” said Gredin. “To a place where rosemary grows by a stream that flows uphill. The domain of the piskies.”

“I don’t believe in any stream that flows uphill,” said Tanya, still smarting from having her innermost thoughts broadcast for all to hear.

“Heathen creatures, piskies,” Gredin continued. “Unpredictable. Dangerous, some say. Whatever they touch becomes twisted and warped. And the rosemary—otherwise renowned for its aid to memory—grows tainted. The properties are reversed.”

He paused for effect. Tanya, wisely sensing this, did not interrupt again.

“Now, there are some folk, known to the fairies as the cunning folk, who are familiar with the qualities of herbs and plants such as rosemary. For even piskie-tainted rosemary has its uses. In the correct quantities it has the power to extract a memory from a mortal head forever, such as the memory of an old sweetheart. Very helpful in some circumstances.

“But the fairies—much as it pains them to have dealings of any kind with the filthy little piskies—also have their own uses for this magical herb. It comes in particularly useful when humans stumble upon the fairy realm unexpectedly, and witness things they have no business seeing. Usually, a small dose sets the situation right and the human is none the worse for it, seemingly waking from a pleasant dream—albeit with no recollection of what the dream was about. However, it has been known to be administered in the wrong quantities. Entire memories have been wiped, just like that.” Gredin snapped his fingers, and Tanya flinched.

“Of course, this is mostly accidental and rare, but sometimes… just sometimes, it is used as a last resort to silence those who otherwise refuse to be silenced. A highly unpleasant fate, most would agree. The poor souls can’t even remember their own names afterward. Unfortunate, but necessary. After all… one cannot speak of what one cannot remember.”

Tanya suddenly tasted fear in her mouth.

“I won’t write about you again.”

“Good,” said Feathercap. “For you would be a fool to attempt it.”

“Just answer me one thing,” said Tanya, as brazenly as she dared. “I can’t be the only one. I know I’m not the only one—”

Gredin silenced her with a look.

Her descent was sudden and unexpected. Feeling herself begin to fall, Tanya instinctively grabbed the only thing at hand—the star lantern covering the lightbulb. There was a terrible cracking noise as the wire strained under her weight, and the plaster of the ceiling around the fixture came down in plate-sized chunks, cracking further as it hit the floor. Then the lantern came away in Tanya’s hands. The lightbulb smashed as she fell to the floor and the lantern went flying out of her grasp and hit the wardrobe, shattering.

As Tanya lay winded, she heard the landing creaking with anxious footsteps. She did not need to look up to know that the fairies would be gone, vanishing as they always did like a scattering of leaves on the breeze. Then her mother was in the room, pulling her up by the shoulder, causing her to cry out. Tanya caught her exclamation of disgust as she surveyed the mess.

“Mum…” she croaked. “I—it was a nightmare…. I’m sorry….”

Even in the moonlight Tanya could see the resigned expression on her mother’s face. She released her grip on Tanya’s arm and slowly sank down on the bed, her hands clenched into balls that she pressed into her eye sockets.

“Mum?” Tanya whispered. She reached over and touched her mother’s arm.

“I don’t know what to do anymore,” her mother said quietly. “I can’t cope with this… this attention seeking of yours. I can’t cope with you.”

“Don’t say that. I’ll be better; I promise I’ll try.”

Her mother gave a weary smile. “That’s what you always say. And I want to believe you… to help you, but I can’t. Not if you won’t talk to me—or to a doctor—”

“I don’t need a doctor. And you wouldn’t understand!”

“No. You’re right, love, I don’t. The only thing I do understand is that I’m at the end of my tether.” She paused to look around at the mess. “Well, you’re going to clean it all up in the morning. Every last bit of it. And the damage comes out of your pocket money, however long it might take. I’m not having this anymore.”

Tanya stared at the floor. A shard of glass glinted in her mother’s bare foot. She knelt down and gently pulled it out, watching as a dark bead of blood formed in its place. Her mother did not react. Instead she got up and shuffled to the door, her shoulders drooping, her feet crunching over the fragments of glass, uncaring.

“Mum?”

The bedroom door closed, leaving her in darkness. Tanya lay back on her bed, too shocked even to cry. The look on her mother’s face had said it all. How many times had she been warned, how many times had she been told about the so-called last straw? Because now, as she listened to the muffled sobbing from the room across the landing, she knew that tonight really had been the last straw for her mother.



Continues...

Excerpted from 13 Treasures by Harrison, Michelle Copyright © 2010 by Harrison, Michelle. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 131 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(90)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 133 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 18, 2011

    Mysterious

    This book was sooooo interesting. It has a lot of mysterys in one book. This book was a fun read and I can't wait to read the next book

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    GREATEST FICTIONAL BOOK EVER!!!!!!!

    This book is one of the best fictional books I've ever read!!!! And I am a twelve year old who still loves stories about fairies! Trust me A GREAT BUY!!!! ( P.S the second book, 13 Curses, is also pretty AMAZING!!!!!!!!)

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 22, 2011

    Best book ever!

    I have absolutely no complaints except that iwish it was longer or the author made a sequel! If you didnt know to buy this or not, hesitate no more ,buy this book! I just suggest buying the actual paper book because its 4 dollars cheaper, but if you cant wait then i dont blame you.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2012

    Cool book

    I was 12 years old when i read this book, and 13 treasures. I am now 13 years old, and i have never found or read a book that is quite like this one. Considering my love for fairy tales, i am always hoping that i will find a book like this one. I especially like the detail in describing the characters.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 24, 2011

    Amazing story!!!!!

    I loved this story sooo sooo much! This story is an amazing story that sent chills up my spine. Not because it was scary, but because of those moments when your like omg!! I have no words to describe how much i enjoyed this book. It will be a story i will always remember, and an adventure that i will never forget!!! Truly one of my top favorite books!!!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2013

    Anonymous

    I didnt know what to pick but i tried the 13 treaures out and i LOVED it!!!!! Cant wait to read the next one

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2012

    Great!

    When i first picked up this book i thought that it would be one not to my liking. But when i started reading it, i was pleasantly surprised. I finished it in a day, even though its not short. I couldnt stop reading! The second book is a great followup too, and i enjoyed that as well!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    Excellent book!

    I really enjoyed this books. The characters were well developed and the plot twisted in many ways. It keeps you interested until the very last page and you won't want to put the book down. I have read the trilogy several times and each time I am drawn in. This book is a real page turner!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2012

    Unexpectedly goos


    Unexpectedly good

    This is a great read. I was excpecting it being all about boring fairies, and its not :)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2012

    excellent read couldnt put it down

    excellent read couldnt put it down

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 20, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    LOVED IT! i loved this book. It was so good, that i finished it

    LOVED IT!
    i loved this book. It was so good, that i finished it in one day! I believe anyone, and everyone will love this book.
    It is a great read. If you are debating about getting this book, i'll help you make your decision ;)
    GET IT!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    Awsome book

    Love this book i am 11 years old and though every time i read a book i try to find a better one each time but this book stands out all the same its on my best books ever read list hope you enjoy it too if you get it

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2012

    Ok

    It was very slow at the beginning,but got really good.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    LOVED IT!!!

    I got this book at the book fair at my sons school and didnt really think it would be that good, just something to read before I got my next Sookie book.....well I loved it! I couldnt put it down. This book is great for kids but mom will love it too. :) Cant wait to get the next one!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2012

    Tanya is no ordinary girl.......

    She can see fairies. Not tliie the ones we imagine. Evil fairies who cast spells on her. Rousing her from her eep and propplelijhg her out of her bed at wits end with her daughters unusual behaviour tanyamother senfds her telvesden manor her grandmothers secluded countryside estate fifty years ago a girl vanished inthe woodsurronding the mansion and as tanya lerns more about the mystery she finds herself dangerously closto vanishing into the fairy realm FOREVER duh duh duh dooooon

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Great Book

    A great book of fairytale and adventure. Its one of those books that when you pick it up you could read it for hours. It gets you thinking one thing then another
    it really hooks you in

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    I heart this book

    I love it so so so so so ... so much. It is about a girl who can see faries. They are not nice faries but evil ones. She can the faries with a second sight. There are others like her but some people cant see the faries. I want the next book the 13 curses.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Eh

    Its boring

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2011

    It is so good by Danyi

    Gosh this book is good. Everyone shouldb read it. Or else you are stupid.
    By DAnyi

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 10, 2011

    I would recommend it to anyone with likes of fanasties and nonfiction.

    It was such a great book! In the beginning it was kind of boring, but after a while it really picked up.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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