1356: A Novel

( 65 )

Overview

"The most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today" (Wall Street Journal) has delivered another blockbuster with this thrilling tale of peril and conquest at the Battle of Poitiers.

September 1356. All over France, towns are closing their gates. Crops are burning, and through-out the countryside people are on the alert for danger. The English army—led by the heir to the throne, the Black Prince—is set to invade, while the French, along with their Scottish ...

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1356: A Novel

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Overview

"The most prolific and successful historical novelist in the world today" (Wall Street Journal) has delivered another blockbuster with this thrilling tale of peril and conquest at the Battle of Poitiers.

September 1356. All over France, towns are closing their gates. Crops are burning, and through-out the countryside people are on the alert for danger. The English army—led by the heir to the throne, the Black Prince—is set to invade, while the French, along with their Scottish allies, are ready to hunt them down.

But what if there was a weapon that could decide the outcome of the imminent war?

Thomas of Hookton, known as le Batard, has orders to uncover the lost sword of Saint Peter, a blade with mystical powers said to grant certain victory to whoever possesses her. The French seek the weapon, too, and so Thomas's quest will be thwarted at every turn by battle and betrayal, by promises made and oaths broken. As the outnumbered English army becomes trapped near Poitiers, Thomas, his troop of archers and men-at-arms, his enemies, and the fate of the sword converge in a maelstrom of violence, action, and heroism.

Rich with colorful characters, great adventure, and thrilling conflict, 1356 is a magnificent tale of how the quest for a holy relic with the power to change history may culminate in an epic struggle.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Cornwell, a master of action-packed historical fiction, returns with the fourth book in his Grail Quest series (after Heretic), a vivid, exciting portrayal of medieval warfare as the English and French butcher each other at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 during the Hundred Years War. Nobody writes battle scenes like Cornwell, accurately conveying the utter savagery of close combat with sword, ax, and mace, and the gruesome aftermath. English archer Sir Thomas of Hookton, called the Bastard by his enemies, leads a band of ruthless mercenaries in France. When the French hear of the existence of the sword of Saint Peter, “another Excalibur,” they must possess it for its legendary mystical powers, but the English have other ideas. Thomas is ordered by his lord, earl of Northampton, to find the sword first and begins, with his men, a perilous journey of raiding and plundering across southern France, fighting brutal warlords, cunning churchmen, with betrayal everywhere, and French and Scottish knights who vow to kill Thomas for reasons that have nothing to do with the sword. With surprising results, Thomas and his men reach the decisive Battle of Poitiers, a vicious melee that killed thousands, unseated a king, and forced a devastating and short peace on a land ravaged by warfare. Agent: Toby Eady Associates, U.K.. (Jan.)
Booklist
“In addition to carving out another action-packed martial adventure, Cornwell spotlights one of the most significant but often overlooked battles of the era.”
USA Today
“The reigning king of historical fiction.”
Bill Sheehan
“Bernard Cornwell is a gifted and prolific historical novelist who seems at home in virtually every era….A lively, accessible account of a remote moment in European history, a book in which Cornwell’s gifts as scholar and storyteller come together spectacularly.”
George R.R. Martin
“Bernard Cornwell does the best battle scenes of any writer I’ve ever read, past or present.”
Lee Child
“Nobody in the world does this stuff better than Cornwell - action set six hundred years ago is as fresh and vital as six days ago, with rough, tough men at war, proving once again that nothing changes... least of all great storytelling.”
Reader's Digest
“The first must-read of 2013 arrives….Bernard Cornwell is a master of combining a thumping good tale with a fascinating history lesson.”
Billy Heller
“Tired of waiting for another of George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones books? Cornwell’s latest novel may be your best option.”
McClatchy News
“Cornwell is one of the best writers of historical fiction.”
Historical Novels Society
“The legions of Cornwell’s fans…will need little encouragement to devour this latest installment in the Hundred Years Way sequence. Everything you expect of a Cornwell offering is here in abundance: interesting characters, rich historical detail, thrilling battles, war, violence, gore, heroism, wry humour….Highly recommended.”
Kirkus Reviews
The most notable English victory of the Hundred Years' War turns on the possession of the sword Jesus bade Peter sheathe in the garden of Gethsemane. At least that's how it looks in Cornwell's fictionalization of the events leading up to the Battle of Poitiers, beginning at the moment that a Black Friar breaks into a 150-year-old coffin and steals off with la Malice, the sword he finds inside. Scant hours behind Fra Ferdinand is an enforcer of the Avignon pope calling himself Father Calade and armed with a hooded hawk who serves as his own enforcer. The large-scale opposition between the English and French forces as they skirmish over ransom for hostages and salaries for mercenaries is complicated by the number of key characters who change sides. Sir Thomas Hookton, who begins by serving the Count of Labrouillade, soon breaks with him over (what else?) the money due him for restoring the faithless countess to his hearth and home. Brother Michael, a Cistercian who's come to Montpellier to study medicine, takes up with Thomas. So does Sir Robert Douglas, who's already fought against the English under his Scottish uncle. Few of these characters have any inkling that a pivotal battle in the endless war for France looms ahead. Neither, for that matter, will unwary readers. For, although every intrigue springs to life under the close-up focus veteran Cornwell (Death of Kings, 2012, etc.) has long since mastered, the strands aren't always closely knitted together: Heroes and subplots blossom and fade with no consistent sense of their connections, and readers approaching the tale without the appropriate historical background will have to survive a long probationary period before they realize where this is all heading. Best for fans of historical fiction who have both a taste for the Hundred Years' War and some base-line knowledge that will allow them to enjoy this swashbuckling recreation.
Dawn Raffel
"The first must-read of 2013 arrives….Bernard Cornwell is a master of combining a thumping good tale with a fascinating history lesson."
Barbara Hoffert
"No one picks a fight like Cornwell, who here does for the Battle of Poitiers what he did for the bloody fray that was Agincourt in the book of that name."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061969676
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Pages: 417
  • Sales rank: 227,607
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Bernard Cornwell is the author of the acclaimed New York Times bestsellers 1356 and Agincourt; the bestselling Saxon Tales, which include The Last Kingdom, The Pale Horseman, Lords of the North, Sword Song, The Burning Land, and most recently Death of Kings; and the Richard Sharpe novels, among many others. He lives with his wife on Cape Cod and in Charleston, South Carolina.

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Interviews & Essays

An interview with Bernard and George RR Martin

Q-- It has long been my contention that the historical novel and the epic fantasy are sisters under the skin, that the two genres have much in common. My series owes a lot to the work of J.R.R. Tolkien, Robert E Howard, Jack Vance, Fritz Leiber, and the other great fantasists who came before me, but I've also read and enjoyed the work of historical novelists like Thomas B. Costain, Mika Waltari, Alfred Duggan, Nigel Tranter, and Maurice Druon. Who were your own influences? What writers did you read growing up? Was historical fiction always your great passion? Did you ever read fantasy?

A--You're right - fantasy and historical novels are twins - and I've never been fond of the label 'fantasy' which is too broad a brush and has a fey quality. It seems to me you write historical novels in an invented world which is grounded in historical reality (if the books are set in the future then 'fantasy' magically becomes sci-fi). So I've been influenced by all three: fantasy, sci-fi and historical novels, though the largest influence has to be C.S. Forester's Hornblower books. I read them as a teenager, was consumed by them, ran out of reading material after the last one of the series and so began to read the non-fiction histories of the Napoleonic period. That led to an obsession with Wellington and his army, which led directly to Sharpe. Maybe if I had read Tolkien before Forester then I'd have taken that route (and it tempts me!), but we all write what we want to read and I was always an avid consumer of historical novels … and, of course, of STORIES! I devoured all the classic SciFi writers, Asimov, Heinlein etc., and they taught me how important story is, but the big debt is still to C.S. Forester (another master-storyteller.)

Q-- Fantasists enjoy certain freedoms that historical novelists do not. I can surprise my readers by killing kings and other major characters, but the fate of the kings and conquerors in the real world is right there in the history texts, we know who lives and who dies before we ever crack the novel open. When battle is joined at Helm's Deep and the Pelennor Fields in Tolkien, or on the Blackwater Rush and in the Whispering Wood in my own fantasies, the outcome of the fight is unknown until the author reveals it on the page, but the historical novelist is bound to trod the road laid down by history. How do you deal with the challenge of making Waterloo or Bull Run or Agincourt suspenseful and exciting when most of your readers know the outcome beforehand?

A--I can surprise my readers by killing kings and other major characters'. Oh yes, you can and do! I still haven't forgiven you for Ned Stark's execution, but I'm learning to live with it! I never think it matters if the reader knows the outcome of the story before they reach the end - we all, as children, wanted the same stories told to us over and over even though we knew the wolf didn't get to gnaw on Little Red Riding Hood. I always think of an historical novel as having two stories - the big one and the little one - and the writer flips them. The big story in Gone With the Wind is whether the South can survive the Civil War and we all know how that went, but the little story is whether Scarlet can save Tara, and that little story is put in the foreground while the big story goes into the background. I suppose the suspense is the little story - will Sharpe survive Badajoz (well, the reader knows he will, I suppose!). And I think readers find a fascination with the unfolding of a story. Most English folk know the Battle of Agincourt - it's deep in the nation's consciousness - but hardly any know what really happened there. History rapidly turns into myth (the myth of Agincourt being that the arrows won the day, which they decidedly did not, though God knows Henry would have lost without them) and perhaps one of the pleasures of reading an historical novel is to discover the truth behind the myth.

Q-- Historical fiction is not history. You're blending real events and actual historical personages with characters of your own creation, like Uhtred and Richard Sharpe. How much "poetic license" should a novelist have when dealing with the events of history? How accurate is he obliged to be? Where do you draw the line?

A--I can't change history (if only), but I can play with it. The answer slightly depends on what I'm writing. I did a trilogy on 'King' Arthur and there's almost no real history to rely on, so I could do more or less what I wanted. With the Saxon books I have a skeleton history thanks to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and few other sources, but there's not much meat on those bones so I have a lot of freedom. If I'm writing about the American Revolution then I have almost no freedom because I'm trespassing on the high ground of American legend and I must stick to the real history if the book is going to persuade the reader of the story's viability - so in Redcoat I changed only one event by bringing it forward 24 hours. And then I confess my sins in an historical note at the book's end. Occasionally I change more drastically; Sharpe's Company tells the story of the dreadful attack on Badajoz and, in brief, a feint attack that was only intended to draw French defenders away from the breaches succeeded in capturing the city while the main attacks, on the breaches, failed disastrously. It seemed to me that the drama of that night was in the breaches, so Sharpe had to attack one of them, and if Richard Sharpe attacks, he wins (he's a hero!). So in the novel I allow the attackers to get through a brach (which didn't happen) because otherwise the story wouldn't work. But again, I confessed the sin at the book's end.

Q-- I've written as much science fiction as I have fantasy over the years. An increasingly popular subgenre in SF is the alternate world novel -- sometimes called "counterfactuals" by historians, and "what if" stories by fans. For want of a nail, the kingdom was lost... but what if the nail wasn't lost? What if Napoleon won at Waterloo? What if the South won the Civil War? What if the Roman Empire never fell? What do you think of such stories? Have you ever been tempted to write one yourself?

A--Never! Maybe it's just me, but alternative history has no appeal. I remember a crazy movie from way back in which F-16's of the USAF suddenly appeared over Pearl Harbor. Yeah right. We began by agreeing that 'fantasy' novels and historical novels are twins and it seems to me that mixing the two is incestuous and, unlike Jaime and Cersei Lannister, I'm not a fan.

Q-- Speaking of battles... I do believe you do the best battle scenes of any writer I've ever read, past or present. And from where I sit, battles are hard. I've written my share. Sometimes I employ the private's viewpoint, very up close and personal, dropping the reader right into the middle of the carnage. That's vivid and visceral, but of necessity chaotic, and it is easy to lose all sense of the battle as a whole. Sometimes I go with the general's point of view instead, looking down from on high, seeing lines and flanks and reserves. That gives a great sense of the tactics, of how the battle is won or lost, but can easily slide into abstraction. But you seem to be able to do both, simultaneously. The arrows at Agincourt, Uhtred grunting and shoving in a Saxon shield wall, Sharpe leading a forlorn hope... you give us all the sounds and smells and blood, and yet the battle tactics always remain comprehensible as well. How do you do it? What are the building blocks of a great battle scene? Of all the battles that you have written, do you have a favorite?

A--I do have one huge advantage over you, which is that my battles were all fought and the survivors left accounts, and some have been comprehensively described by military historians, so I'm given a framework that you have to invent. I also hate reading a military history and getting confused, usually by Roman numerals ('XV Corps moved to the west while the XIV Brigade was redeployed southwards' and so on) which means you're constantly having to refer to a map, or maps, and try to remember who XV Corps are . . . so I try to give the reader a framework before the battle begins - where are they fighting? What are the salient landmarks? Which units are important? I don't want the reader to stop and refer to a map ... though I'm sure I fail. That done I do try and switch the point of view, just as you do, between the close-up and nasty and the more distant overview of the fighting. John Keegan's The Face of Battle is a marvellous book to read and discover just how men experience battle, and that was a great influence. I have invented battles from scratch - and the one I'm proudest of is Mount Badon in the Arthur books. The battle did happen, but we know nothing of what happened (or even where it happened), so I used Wellington's tactics from the battle of Salamanca and they worked perfectly! And of all the battles? Probably Salamanca in Sharpe's Sword.

Q-- A familiar theme in a lot of epic fantasy is the conflict between good and evil. The villains are often Dark Lords of various ilks, with demonic henchmen and hordes of twisted, malformed underlings clad in black. The heroes are noble, brave, chaste, and very fair to look upon. Yes, Tolkien made something grand and glorious from that, but in the hands of lesser writers, well... let's just say that sort of fantasy has lost its interest for me. It is the grey characters who interest me the most. Those are the sort I prefer to write about... and read about. It seems to me that you share that affinity. Your protagonists have moments of heroism, but they have flaws as well. Much as I enjoy reading about Uhtred, there's more than a little darkness to him, and Richard Sharpe was not a man to cross. You even went so far as to make the protagonist of your American Civil War novels a copperhead, a Northerner fighting for the South... not a group that usually engenders much sympathy. Your villains are just as human, not a cardboard monster among them. And you are often less than reverent when depicting some of the established heroes of British and American history. Paul Revere and Alfred the Great come to mind. What is it about flawed characters that makes them more interesting than conventional heroes?

A--Maybe all our heroes are reflections of ourselves? I'm not claiming to be Richard Sharpe (God forbid), but I'm sure parts of my personality leaked into him (he's very grumpy in the morning). I once wrote a series of forewords for the Hornblower books and had to deal with the perennial question of who was Hornblower based on? Some said Cochrane, others suggested Edward Pellew (both outstanding frigate captains of the Napoleonic Wars), but it was obvious that Hornblower was the person Forester himself wanted to be. Hornblower was Forester, without some of Forester's less attractive traits. Most of my heroes are outsiders . . . maybe because I felt that way growing up (long story, let's not tell it here), and which is why my favorite characters of yours are Arya and Jon Snow. And perhaps flawed characters are more interesting because they are forced to make a choice . . . a conventionally good character will always do the moral, right thing. Boring. Sharpe often does the right thing, but usually for the wrong reasons, and that's much more interesting!

Q-- When Tolkien began writing The Lord of the Rings, it was intended as a sequel to The Hobbit. "The tale grew in the telling," he said later, when LOTR had grown into the trilogy we know today. That's a line I have often had occasion to quote over the years, as my own Song of Ice and Fire swelled from the three books I had originally sold to the seven books (five published, two more to write) I'm now producing. Much of your own work has taken the form of multi-part series. Are your tales too 'growing in the telling,' or do you know how long your journeys will take before you set out? When you wrote that first Sharpe book, did you ever imagine how long and how far you would march with him and Harper? Did you know how many books Uhtred's story would require, when you first sat down to write about him?

A--No idea! I don't even know what will happen in the next chapter, let alone the next book, and have no idea how many books there might be in a series. E.L. Doctorow said something I like which is that writing a novel is a bit like driving down an unfamiliar country road at night and you can only see as far ahead as your somewhat feeble headlamps show. I write into the darkness. I guess the joy of reading a book is to find out what happens, and for me that's the joy of writing one too!

Q-- I have met thousands of my readers face to face, not only on book tours, but at SF and fantasy conventions, where there tends to be considerably more interaction between writers and readers than is customary in other genres. I used to answer all my fan mail, in the days when readers still mailed letters care of my publishers. (It was easy; there wasn't much). Email has increased the amount of letters I receive a thousand-fold, well beyond my capacity to keep up, but I still try to read all the mail that comes in, even when I cannot answer it. I don't do Facebook or twitter, but I do blog (on Live Journal), and my email address can be found easily enough. But there are perils to being so accessible, as I have discovered in recent years. The vast majority of my fans are amazing people, perceptive, intelligent, supportive ... but there is a small but vocal minority who can be vexing. How have you related to your own readers over the years? Do you feel a writer owes anything to his readers, beyond the work itself? Do fans send you suggestions about how they want your series to end? Send you artwork, gifts? Name children and pets after your characters? Write "fan fiction" using your characters? Do you ever find yourself being influenced by the reactions of your readers to a book, or a character?

A--I've found my fans to be terrific. There's a miniscule handful who want to nitpick over details (and yes, of course there are mistakes) and once, on my website, I begged one such reader to please find another author to read. But the vast majority are fun to meet and it's vitally important to listen to them. I did a book tour once and three people separately told me it was time Sharpe had some high-class totty! I hadn't realised he'd been consorting with rough trade for so many books, so I responded by giving him Lady Grace in Sharpe's Trafalgar and she remains my favorite heroine. She'd never have existed without the fans!

Q-- Both of us have had the privilege of seeing our characters brought to life on television. Sean Bean was Richard Sharpe long before he was Ned Stark. (And truth be told, he was Ned Stark in no small measure because David Benioff, Dan Weiss, and I had all seen how masterfully he played Sharpe). How did you feel about the BBC series? To what extent were you involved with it? Will we ever see any of your other characters on screen? If so, would you want to write the screenplays yourself? What do you think makes for a good adaptation? And will we ever see Sean Bean as Sharpe again?

A--I thought the Sharpe TV series was great! Of course they changed the books, they had no choice. You and I can wheel on 100,000 men and it costs us nothing, but every extra is a drain on a TV budget, but they dealt very well with that constraint and Sean, of course, was a marvellous Sharpe and a great Ned Stark (who should have lived, damn you). So far as I know there aren't any plans for another series. There's talk of making Agincourt into a film (I'm not holding my breath) and a TV series about Uhtred (which would be nice, but again I'm still breathing). I want nothing to do with any such production, other than being a cheerleader. I worked in television for eleven year and learned enough to know I know nothing about producing TV drama, so I'm happy to leave it to the experts. And I doubt I could write a script - I've never tried and would rather write a novel.

Q-- Last question. What's next for Bernard Cornwell? You've done the Napoleonic Wars, the American Civil War, the Hundred Years War, King Arthur, the Saxons and Danes. Will you be returning to any of those eras, revisiting any of your great series characters? Or are there other eras of history that you mean to explore?

A--There's one period I'm desperate to write about (forgive me if I don't say which because I don't want someone else muscling in on it first!). But next is another novel about Thomas of Hookton in the Hundred Years War, then it's back to Uhtred and the Saxons.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 65 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(31)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(12)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 65 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Another Awesome Book by a Master Storyteller!!

    Bernard Cornwell can certainly bring a period of time that I know very little about to vivid, roaring life! First, for those of you wondering what the book is about: 1346 is a continuation of the story of Thomas of Hookton (Grail's Quest series) and it definitely ties up loose threads by destroying some VERY irritating people (bessieres to name one). For those of you who haven't read the series I would definitely recommend that you read the first three novels before this one but honestly, you could muddle through it if you don't choose to read the others first. All in all...this was a wonderful book and I'm just bloodthirsty enough to be glad that some very bad guys got theirs in the end. This series has been wonderful from beginning to end(?).

    12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Wonderful

    Great characters and story. Ending seemed a bit abrupt being all '....and..... the wars over' but thoroughly enjoyed the story.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    1356 by Bernard Cornwell Thomas of Hookton returns to life in t

    1356 by Bernard Cornwell

    Thomas of Hookton returns to life in the spellbinding second chapter in Cornwell's Grail Quest Trilogy. This time, Cornwell bases his story on the famous battle of Poitiers, held on September 19, 1356, between Edward, Prince of Wales and son of King Edward III of England, and King Jean II of France.

    The story starts with Thomas of Hookton, or Le Batard, as he is known, in a mercenary war with the Bishop of Lavence to avenge the count of Labrouillade, whose wife has abandoned him for the younger and handsomer Lord of Villon. After rescuing the count's wife, Bertille, the count cheats Thomas of his spoils and Thomas strikes back at the count.

    Chased throughout France, Thomas is given a task by his lord and protector, the Earl of Northampton to find La Malice - St. Peter's sword used to defend our Lord, Jesus Christ when he was captured in the Garden of Gethsemane - and bring it back to the English. The French seek the sword too, so the story narrates Thomas' adventures as his quest is thwarted at every turn and betrayal, by promises made and broken until Thomas joins forces with Prince Edward to defeat The French.

    The book is a pleasure to read. Well researched, well written - each change of point of view is clearly marked so that reader can follow easily. The character development is excellent - my favorite character was the picaresque countess of Malbuisson, an octogenarian at the convent of Saint Dorcas, who not only comes to Thomas' rescue, but also helps him decipher the clues of the saint who held la Malice - St. Junen of Poitous - and also manages to rob Thomas of a small fortune as he is forced to gamble with her to keep her entertained all night.

    I read the book in three days, and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction as much as I do.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 14, 2013

    Please rate the book and not the marketing video. It skews the r

    Please rate the book and not the marketing video. It skews the reviews for those of us who are interested in the actual book. My five starts is a start at getting the review back to a typical rating for a Cornwell book.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    Rate a product by using/reading it not by viewing the advertisment onky and then drawing conclusions about the whole work.

    Ifail to comprehend how several people have rated this book with only one star. If the people who rated this wonderful book with only one or two stars had actually read the work instead of drawing all of their information from only the synopsis video they would have rated ir much higher. A question to all the people who obviously rated this novel based solely on the synopsis is this; if i were to show you an advertisment for a steak that was the best ad you had ever seen would yiu rate the steak as the best tasting steak you've ever eaten? No, of course you wouldn't you would rate it based on the taste. So why then do you rate a book before you've even read it. People look at reviews to see how others who have read the book liked it not to see how good the synopsis was.
    So here is my review, this book is a must read it is much better than the one star rating would have you believe

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    You want us to pay $17.00 for a book no one knows anything about

    You want us to pay $17.00 for a book no one knows anything about and doesn't have a product review. That's likely.

    3 out of 39 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2013

    I'd like to rate the book, but what the hell is it about?? what

    I'd like to rate the book, but what the hell is it about?? what battle? What war between France & England??? that video was no help at all!

    3 out of 42 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2013

    HELLO, PEOPLE! You are supposed to watch the video. Not that tha

    HELLO, PEOPLE! You are supposed to watch the video. Not that that really helps a whole H of a lot of help. Something about a lopsided battle between Brit and French troops and 20 yrs of war. Sorry, HCP, that does not cut it as adequate product detail. Might work for a movie, but if you want to sell a book to people who READ for entertainment, you need to use WORDS!!!!

    3 out of 40 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2013

    Cornwell at his usual excellent

    It was good to see a few old friends and some new characters as well. He presents a marvelous historical novel with few competitors. It's all there, everything you could expect in history; courage, brilliance, faith, stupidity, the man doesn't miss a trick

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 22, 2013

    Another triumph for our archer

    A worthy continuation of the grail series. It held my attention such as I read too fast and the book was finished too soon. Well worth the read, I heartily recommend it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2013

    Grail Quest Book 4. As good as the first 3 of the grail quest s

    Grail Quest Book 4. As good as the first 3 of the grail quest series. All our characters we liked in the series have returned in this installment. As another reviewer wrote you can read and enjoy this book as a stand alone, but I wouldn't skip over the first three books, they are just as well written as 1356. Thomas' character evolves well and I loved reading all four books.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    Great a always!

    Great a always!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2013

    A nice little video does not tell the prospective buyer a thing

    A nice little video does not tell the prospective buyer a thing about the product. As said before, please assume we are literate and write a synopsis!

    2 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    I have no Idea. No review or synopsis was provided. Just an empt

    I have no Idea. No review or synopsis was provided. Just an empty box

    2 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2013

    As always, Bernard Cornwell brings history alive.

    As always, Bernard Cornwell brings history alive.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2013

    Cornwell never misses.

    Cornwell never misses.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2013

    Rate the book. The negative ratings on the video harm the abili

    Rate the book. The negative ratings on the video harm the ability to sell the book. That affects the author as well as the publisher. This may be poor marketing, but if the book is good then rate it as such.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2013

    Well I wouldn't know what to think because you don't tell me any

    Well I wouldn't know what to think because you don't tell me anything at all about the book! What kind of silliness is that? Was is Agincourt? There the English were incredibly outnumbered. But it did not last 20 yrs. Where does it say anything about 20 yrs anyway? Well, we can get a sample. Or look it up in the regular book section and maybe there's more of an outline.

    1 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    QWERTYUIOP

    Is this book good?????

    1 out of 47 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2014

    *****

    Best yet!

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