1635: The Dreeson Incident (The 1632 Universe)

Overview

First Time in Paperback for This Exciting Installment in the New York Times Best-Selling Ring of Fire Series—

The Most Popular and Best-Selling Alternate History Series.

The Thirty Years War continues to ravage 17th century Europe, but a new force is gathering power and influence: the United States of Europe, a new nation led by Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, and the West Virginians from the 20th century ...

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Overview

First Time in Paperback for This Exciting Installment in the New York Times Best-Selling Ring of Fire Series—

The Most Popular and Best-Selling Alternate History Series.

The Thirty Years War continues to ravage 17th century Europe, but a new force is gathering power and influence: the United States of Europe, a new nation led by Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, and the West Virginians from the 20th century led by Mike Stearns who were hurled centuries into the past by a mysterious cosmic accident.

While the old entrenched rulers and manipulators continue to plot against this new upstart nation, everyday life goes on in Grantville, the town lost in time, with librarians, firefighters, and garbage collectors trying to make do under unusual circumstances. And what better place for an undercover spy from France than working with the garbage collectors, examining 20th century machines that others throw out, and copying the technology (though he wishes one device—the paper shredder—had been left behind in the future).

There are more sinister agents at work, however. One of them, Ducos, almost succeeded in assassinating the Pope, but his plan was ruined by quick action by a few Americans. Now, the would-be assassin not only has a score to settle, but has also decided on two excellent targets: Grantville’s leader Mike Stearns and his wife Rebecca. . . .

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Ever since a cosmic phenomenon displaced the West Virginia town of Grantville in time and space, the community has worked to craft a 17th-century United States of Europe, introducing modified 20th-century technology as well as ideas of democracy and egalitarianism to a world hardly able to accept them, except for the forward-looking King of Sweden, Gustavus Adolphus, who now heads the USE. As the Thirty Years' War takes its toll on Europe, an assassin, thwarted from his attempt to kill the pope by a handful of Americans, now turns his sights on Mark and Rebecca Stearns, the leaders of the West Virginians. The latest installment in the popular "Ring of Fire" series keeps the action moving and the history honest as ordinary citizens of the 20th century bring their skills and their hopes to a dark time in European history. Working with coauthor DeMarce, a frequent contributor to the Grantville Gazette anthologies, Flint continues to produce entertaining and involving alternate histories in the tradition of Harry Turtledove. Essential for series fans and recommended for most libraries.


—Jackie Cassada
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439133675
  • Publisher: Baen
  • Publication date: 8/31/2010
  • Series: 1632 Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 832
  • Sales rank: 398,564
  • Product dimensions: 7.02 (w) x 11.08 (h) x 1.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric Flint is the author of the New York Times best seller 1634: The Galileo Affair (with Andrew Dennis)—a novel in his top-selling “Ring of Fire” alternate history series. His first novel for Baen, Mother of Demons, was picked by Science Fiction Chronicle as a best novel of the year. His 1632, which launched the ring of Fire series, won widespread critical praise, as from Publishers Weekly, which called him “an SF author of particular note, one who can entertain and edify in equal, and major, measure.” A longtime labor union activist with a master’s degree in history, he currently resides in northwest Indiana with his wife Lucille.
Virginia DeMarce, after jobs as peculiar as counting raisins for the Calif. Dept. of Agriculture, received her Ph.D. in Early Modern European History from Stanford University. She has published a book on German military settlers in Canada after the American Revolution and has served as president of the National Genealogical Society. She taught at Northwest Missouri State University and at George Mason University. She has had stories in the Ring of Fire anthology and Grantville Gazette (#1), and more stories in the online Grantville

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2009

    Weakest of the Books in the Series

    This book is similar to The Ram Rebellion (by the same two authors earlier in the series) inasmuch as it actually seems to be more a string of episodic pieces strung together. I think the point was to show how people actually behave and how families go through various strains and stresses. That is how real life works. Unfortunately, it makes for a tedious read. The book is largely the long conversations members of a handful of extended families have in the series setting, and while a plot is unfolding more or less simulaneously, the conversations that make up the largest part of the novel tend to the repititious and bland. This would have been a strong entry (or several entries) in an anthology, but overall it made it a slog to get through. If it was designed to echo more "real life," I would remind the authors that if I wanted to read "real life" I would not be picking up a novel in this genre.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 3, 2008

    If you enjoyed 1632, 1634 and 1635 (Canon Law) skip this book and wait until 1636 arrives

    I must confess I have not yet read the entire book. I am only on page 300 and am still trying to maintain a semblance of remembering the names of numerous characters as they appear. Thankfully, a list of characters appears in the back which is essential to an understanding of the ongoing plot. So far the majority of action (if you like that type of entertainment)consists of conversations that occur around kitchen tables or bars with LOTS of details about family history which do not (necessarily)add to the plot. If you gather from reading this that I have been EXTREMELY disappointed, you have reached the correct conclusion. I suppose the real disappointment comes because it is so satisfying to think what if we 21st century Americans really did have a chance to impact the many injustices that occurred in real history. The brush used to paint this story was not a broad brush covering lots of actions but a very small detail brush which makes me wonder why when it takes so much effort to write a book that the authors did not ask for additional input on the skeletal outline before tackling the story. It has been such a severe disappointment after 300 pages I am not sure if I will finish it although I probably will just to see if there are (finally) any redeeming qualities. I certainly hope so!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2009

    Very disappointing

    I've enjoyed most of the series so far, although the earlier books were better than the most recent. This book however is so bad I've put it back on the shelf unfinished. If I want to listen to gossip and who's related to who, I'll go talk to my mother. If there is a plot in this book, I haven't found it yet. I just can't force myself to put up with plodding through it any more and I'm about half way through.<BR/><BR/>I wasn't impressed by the Ram Rebellion which was also coauthored by Virginia DeMarce. Granted the Ram Rebellion had at least some plot. Going forward I don't think I'll buy any more books in this series where Virginia DeMarce is one of the authors. Other books in the series with other authors have generally been good. <BR/><BR/>All of the books, do seemed to go through sections where they plod along. Maybe its the need to set the scene and characters in every book, something that most other series don't need to do. It could also be that there are way to many story lines going on in most of these books. The first book was very good, the rest have been at best good. Some like this book and Ram Rebellion have actually been bad.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2009

    Dreeson incident is a big let down

    The storyline is garbled. It concentrates way to much on who is related to whom instead of building a story. and then the story is very weak. This is the worst book of the series, If you have been waiting for the election to happen, its almost skipped over here.
    Thus ends this series of stories for me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2009

    Dreeson Affair a Miss

    Although those of us who are loyal fans would not have been happy without having read the Dreeson Affair, it is not up to the standards of the other books in the series, especially 1632 and the Baltic War. I think that Flint should have used another helper in writing this book because there was entirely to much geneology and romance and not enough creative thought.

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  • Posted April 14, 2009

    Reads like a phonebook - lots of characters but not much plot.

    If you are looking for one of the crisp action-focused plots that typify Eric Flint's writing, you won't find it here. If, on the other hand, you want to know the detailed social history of half the population of Grantville - and all their new downtime relatives, then this is your book.

    The plot drowns in detail about characters. This is the first book in the 1632 series I was seriously tempted to not finish. I spent half the book royally confused about who all these people were and why they were important to the storyline. I was just barely hanging in there desperately hoping for a smidgin of plot and action. I simply couldn't make myself care that much about all these people and their convoluted relationships.

    I realize that the 1632 universe is taking on a life of its own as other authors add their piece. In the long-run, as more and more of the 1632 universe rolls out, some of the various relationships in the book will become important to future developments. However, Flint - or a good editor - needs to rein-in the other authors a bit and ensure that the writing retains some of the characteristics that brought so many of us to the series. Another book or two like this one and this series will die a well-deserved death from lack of ongoing interest.

    I've been buying the series in hardback because I just couldn't wait for some of the earlier releases. From now on, I think I will wait for the paperbacks to come out.

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  • Posted March 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    1635: The Dreeson Incident

    Excellent book. Good set up for future developements in the series.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 16, 2009

    Everyone has their off days...

    And this book is Mr. Flint's and Ms. DeMarce's off day indeed. I am a devoted fan of this series and have been a dedicated fan since the beginning. I was truly disappointed in this book - I finally quit about half way through and skipped to the ending.<BR/><BR/>I found it, quite frankly, boring. It was the written equivalent of watching paint dry.<BR/><BR/>I will continue to read Mr. Flint, I suspect that the collaboration with Ms. DeMarce was not a happy one, and so I will not read anything further with her as a co-author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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