17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore

( 7 )

Overview

A laugh-out-loud look at all the fun things grown-ups never let you do . . . now in paperback! Jenny Offill, author of 11 Experiments That Failed, describes how tough it is to be a kid, when even the (seemingly) best ideas are met with resistance. The text is short, spare, and fall-on-the-floor funny—not to mention utterly child-friendly. Here, accompanied by Nancy Carpenter's hilariously clever illustrations, is a day-in-the-life look at a kid as she torments her brother, her pet, her classmates, and, of course,...

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17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore

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Overview

A laugh-out-loud look at all the fun things grown-ups never let you do . . . now in paperback! Jenny Offill, author of 11 Experiments That Failed, describes how tough it is to be a kid, when even the (seemingly) best ideas are met with resistance. The text is short, spare, and fall-on-the-floor funny—not to mention utterly child-friendly. Here, accompanied by Nancy Carpenter's hilariously clever illustrations, is a day-in-the-life look at a kid as she torments her brother, her pet, her classmates, and, of course, her mother. The theme of this Dragonfly Book is Just for Fun.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The title is terrifically cheeky, and Carpenter (Fannie in the Kitchen) outdoes herself in these mixed-media illustrations. The unnamed heroine, who resembles a cross between Ramona Quimby and Eloise, generates the title list as a result of her free-spirited, rule-breaking notions. "I had an idea to staple my brother's hair to his pillow," accompanies a photo-collage image of a stapler clamping onto a pillow corner, with a pen-and-ink drawing of the brother's sleeping face. Opposite, the boy, bound into his pillowcase, clings to his mother: "I am not allowed to use the stapler anymore." Offill (Last Things, for adults), making her children's book debut, follows with a litany of forbidden behavior encompassing everything from not being allowed to make ice cubes ("I had an idea to freeze a dead fly in the ice cube tray") to not being allowed "to talk (even a little bit) about beavers anymore" (because she "had an idea that [she] might run away to live with the kind and happy beavers"). Carpenter uses a fluid, elegant ink line to convey an impressive repertoire of expressions-she's equally adept at portraying a playground tattletale and a mom at the end of her rope. Kids will be intrigued by the pictures' playful sense of composition as well as the heroine's brazenness, but may be caught off-guard by the abrupt conclusion. Ages 4-8. (Dec.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz
Our mischievous but delightful heroine is the kind of kid who makes parents and teachers old before their time, but still makes us laugh. As she describes the 17 things she's not allowed to do any more, we can see why. Among her "great ideas" are stapling her brother's hair to his pillow, gluing his slippers to the floor, walking backward all the way to school, and dedicating her George Washington report "to all beavers that ever lived." As she continues putting her ideas into action at home, freezing a dead fly in the ice cube tray and ordering dinner from her mother as if she were a waitress, her mother despairs. They seem to reach agreement with a final hug, but then even her "I'm sorry" promises more mischief ahead. Carpenter combines a lively pen and ink black line with naturalistic colors and digital media to present believable youngsters and an impatient teacher in the classroom; a stern crossing guard; an infuriated brother reacting to a bombardment with cauliflower. The mottled look of the paper is achieved by crumpling it and filing with an emery board; Adobe Photoshop is used to rescan and manipulate the type; bits of photo collage are added for a fresh visual look. The glue she is smilingly squeezing from the bottle on the jacket has an attractive three-dimensional quality.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Ingenious artwork-a flawless marriage of digital imagery and pen-and-ink-is indisputably the focus of this winning title. In it, an incorrigible little girl lists all the bright ideas she's ever had and the various ways they've gotten her into trouble. From stapling her brother's hair to his pillow (no more stapler) to gluing his slippers to the floor (no more glue), her outside-the-box thinking attracts plenty of attention, all of it negative. Carpenter brings depth and texture to each spread by adjusting photo-realistic elements to scale and embedding them into the art. The effect is both striking and subtle-"real" wood grain, blades of grass, the chrome-plated details on classroom furniture-all are seamlessly integrated around a winsome cast of well-drawn characters. Some picture books are overconceptualized, overdesigned, and generally overdone, but this one is just about picture-perfect.-Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A lass tallies her pranks and ensuing punishments in this Judith Viorst-like plaint. Actually, "punishments" is too strong a word, as stapling her little brother's hair to his pillow, showing her underpants to classmate Jeremy and then later setting his shoe on fire with a magnifying glass seems to draw no retribution beyond commands not to do it again: "I am not allowed to use the glue anymore." Some of her misdemeanors are very funny: "I am not allowed to give the gift of cauliflower anymore." But some actually earn real punishments: a school detention and an escort home by the crossing guard. Finally, when she says the opposite of what she really means-"I'm sorry"-she earns forgiveness. Carpenter uses ink, paint and clipped photos to create energetic scenes featuring a deceptively winning young narrator with short, messy hair and, usually, a confident or smug expression. Some readers may find this young envelope-pusher entertainingly spirited, but there are sure to be those who are going to balk at the notion of pretending to be sorry and having it work. (Picture book. 6-8)
From the Publisher
School Library Journal starred review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375835964
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 12/26/2006
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 698,676
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.22 (w) x 9.77 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author

JENNY OFFILL is the author of 17 Things I’m Not Allowed to Do Anymore, a Parenting Magazine Best Book of the Year and a Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Book of the Year, and 11 Experiments That Failed, also a Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Book of the Year, which Kirkus Reviews, in a starred review, called “the most joyful and clever whimsy.”

NANCY CARPENTER is the illustrator of Imogene's Last Stand by Candace Fleming; Apples to Oregon, an ALA-ALSC Notable Children's Book, and Fannie in the Kitchen, both by Deborah Hopkinson; Sitti's Secrets by Naomi Shihab Nye, winner of the Jane Addams Picture Book Award; Masai and I by Virginia Kroll; Loud Emily by Alexis O'Neill; and the jackets for the Emestine & Amanda series. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2007

    Molly's Reviews

    My students agreed the illustrations are great, the story had potential and little kids who don¿t know better will be swayed by it. They also thought the main character should have shown some remorse, mended her ways and been honest when she apologized. A book that presents a non apologetic and feeling no remorse for her behavior, misbehaving child in the position of role model is not one that I will soon return to my classroom. Lie to everyone by pretending remorse is not the lesson that I want to teach to my own children or to others. I would like to see more work by this author/illustrator team, however I would like to see this particular character presented in a more responsible manner and as a more responsible little girl. I agree with my students, she is not a cheery little imp, she is a willful, misbehaving girl who needs to learn discipline. Reaction from my students ran the gamut from `I would be given time out,¿ to `I would be grounded,¿ to `I might even get a spanking, if I did any of the things that girl did.¿ The fact that the little girl continued and continued to misbehave and not make any change even though consequence was offered was troubling to me as a teacher and a parent.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2012

    Haha

    Thats so cute

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2012

    Book for the new milinium

    This was agreat book for my baby sister!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2007

    Creative and Hilarious

    '17 Things...' tells the tale of a creative and impish girl who has many wonderful ideas that somehow are not perceived as positively by traditional PC adults. As the un-named heroine tries to implement her plans, she is thwarted time and again and is 'not allowed to' do the action that blossomed from her idea. Noted novelist and editor Jenny Offill has a great success in her first children's offering the book has won several awards from teacher and library associations and is well into its second printing. The book is fabulously illustrated by Nancy Carpenter and is a visual treat. Hard to understand the disapproval of the few reviewers who seem to prefer a contrite child who never strays into adventure and misadventure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2007

    I laughed so hard, I cried

    I loved this book. Sure, it isn't a good example for kids, but it is a good way to get a line of communication going. It certainly shows some things many kids would never think of doing, but if you're listening and talking with your kids while reading it or after you read it I think it's great!

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    Posted April 4, 2011

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    Posted April 15, 2011

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    Posted January 9, 2011

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