1862: Fredericksburg: A New Look at a Bitter Civil War Battle

1862: Fredericksburg: A New Look at a Bitter Civil War Battle

by Karen Kostyal
     
 

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Through National Geographic’s heart-stopping you-are-there reenactment photography and in-depth research and reporting, readers will be transported back to this key episode in our nation’s history. Considered Lee’s “most one-sided victory of the war,” Fredericksburg was a significant turning point in the Civil War. 1862 takes a new…  See more details below

Overview

Through National Geographic’s heart-stopping you-are-there reenactment photography and in-depth research and reporting, readers will be transported back to this key episode in our nation’s history. Considered Lee’s “most one-sided victory of the war,” Fredericksburg was a significant turning point in the Civil War. 1862 takes a new look at the battle and provides readers with a unique perspective on what the war meant to non combatants and particularly to blacks on the cusp of freedom. This extraordinary coverage is made possible by newly discovered primary sources, including a never-before-known slave diary. From death, injury, and despair to victory and the trials of post-war life, the 1862 battle of Fredericksburg changed a town and a nation forever.
 
As the newest installment in the New Look series, this fresh, new historical book is timed to coincide with the beginning of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and will complement school curriculums in fifth and eighth grades.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
In December 1862 the armies of Generals Robert E. Lee and Ambrose Burnside clashed in a rare Civil War winter battle. After marching to the shoreline across the Rappahannock River from the town of Fredericksburg, Virginia, General Burnside's Union Army of the Potomac paused before conducting what would ultimately become one of the saddest and most misguided attacks of the entire Civil War. On a cold winter day, brigade after brigade of blue-clad Federal troops attacked the Confederates who were ensconced behind a stone wall on Marye's Heights. In the end, Burnside's men suffered terrible casualties without any real chance of achieving victory. The Battle of Fredericksburg was a bloody and relatively easy victory for General Lee, but also one that exacted a great toll on the civilian residents of the town. Here in a beautifully illustrated publication, readers will learn not only about the military events that transpired during the Battle of Fredericksburg, but also the human experience of the preceding campaign on both soldiers and civilians. Of particular interest are the periodic primary source selections in the form of diary entries or letters that pepper the text. These primary source lenses offer readers a look behind the curtain of historical record and reveal the feeling of participants in these events. Additionally, the many photos of historical re-enactors, recreating aspects of the Fredericksburg campaign are a compelling reinforcement of the narrative. This is a fine book that will interest readers with a bent for Civil War or American history. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—War is hell, as evidenced by this narrative about one of the most devastated sites of the Civil War. Fredericksburg, VA, and its vicinity saw battle four times over the course of the conflict. Realistic, full-color pictures of modern-day re-enactors mix with clear language to bring the action to life. The text is interspersed with personal accounts, such as those from slave John Washington, an unknown soldier from the Second Wisconsin regiment, and a white woman named Jane Beale. Fredericksburg was almost completely destroyed, but was reborn after the ruin and by the end of the 1800s had a few new industries. Brief chapters tell the war's story from the perspective of what happened at Fredericksburg in a concise manner. A chronology from fall 1862 to spring 1865 is appended. A valuable resource for classrooms, libraries, and travelers to Fredericksburg and the surrounding area.—Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426308352
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
09/13/2011
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,379,232
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
1160L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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