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1916 The Easter Rising
     

1916 The Easter Rising

by Tim Pat Coogan
 

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An account of the events, personalities and repercussions of the Irish rebellion

The Easter Rising began at 12 noon, 24 April, 1916 and lasted for six short but bloody days, resulting in the deaths of innocent civilians, the destruction of many parts of Dublin, and the true beginning of Irish independence.

The 1916 Rising was born out of the Conservative

Overview

An account of the events, personalities and repercussions of the Irish rebellion

The Easter Rising began at 12 noon, 24 April, 1916 and lasted for six short but bloody days, resulting in the deaths of innocent civilians, the destruction of many parts of Dublin, and the true beginning of Irish independence.

The 1916 Rising was born out of the Conservative and Unionist parties' illegal defiance of the democratically expressed wish of the Irish electorate for Home Rule; and of confusion, mishap and disorganisation, compounded by a split within the Volunteer leadership.

Tim Pat Coogan introduces the major players, themes and outcomes of a drama that would profoundly affect twentieth-century Irish history. Not only is this the story of a turning point in Ireland's struggle for freedom, but also a testament to the men and women of courage and conviction who were prepared to give their lives for what they believed was right.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
There being no shortage of books on the Easter Rising, this book must have been published for its pictures of fighters, damaged buildings, and typed orders. Viewing the current peace process through the legacy of the rising is the core of Coogan's (The IRA; Ireland Since the Rising) narrative. That legacy and the political extremists on both sides keep colliding, he writes, and when peace seems at hand another group claims the mantle of the IRA or the Orange Order and resists. Coogan ultimately touches on a more irresistible force than Easter 1916 the Catholics of Ulster are reproducing faster than the Protestants are; democracy should ultimately yield to demographics. In the meantime, this volume is bound and printed more like a coffee-table book than a history, so perhaps it would do better as a gift. An entertaining read but strictly for devotees. Robert Moore, Parexel Corp., Waltham, MA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
New Yorker
Dublin burned, British troops and Irish separatists exchanged gunfire and artillery shells, and about two hundred and thirty civilians were killed during Easter week in Ireland in 1916. As Tim Pat Coogan writes in 1916: The Easter Rising, the rebel leader James Connolly, injured and confined to the Irish Volunteer headquarters after a few days of bloody fighting, passed the time reading a detective novel. During a rare quiet moment, Connolly dryly remarked, "A book like this, plenty of rest and an insurrection -- all at the same time. This certainly is revolution de luxe." Out in the streets, his militia battled to take the city, fighting with a bravery that has been repeatedly eulogized since. Within a week, the group was forced to surrender, and, like most of the leaders of the rebellion, Connolly himself was executed.

Into this turbulent landscape Jamie O'Neill casts the heroes of his historical novel, At Swim, Two Boys, whose title is a play on the title of Flann O'Brien's landmark Irish comic novel At Swim-Two-Birds. This story takes place in the year leading up to the Easter Rising and investigates the complicated weave of alliances in Ireland; the two Dublin boys struggle not only with their political affiliations but with their religious and sexual identities.

W. B. Yeats spoke to Ireland's scars of strife, famously noting in "Easter, 1916" that, after the Rising, "All changed, changed utterly: / A terrible beauty is born." A new volume of Yeats's essays, Writings on Irish Folklore, Legend and Myth, examines ancient tales of the land -- an Ireland bewitched by "sociable fairies," the banshee, and the medieval warrior Cuchulain. In fables, Yeats writes, mortals are transformed into "perfect symbols of the sorrow and beauty and of the magnificence and penury of dreams.'' (Lauren Porcaro)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780753818527
Publisher:
Orion Publishing Group, Limited
Publication date:
05/28/2005
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
134,300
Product dimensions:
7.76(w) x 5.00(h) x 0.63(d)

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Meet the Author

Tim Pat Coogan was editor of the Irish Press and is now recognised as Ireland's leading popular historian of the twentieth century. He is based in Dublin, Ireland.

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