1938: Hitler's Gamble

1938: Hitler's Gamble

3.6 9
by Giles MacDonogh
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0465009549

ISBN-13: 9780465009541

Pub. Date: 12/01/2009

Publisher: Basic Books


The Third Reich came of age in 1938. Hitler began the year as the leader of a right-wing coalition and ended it as the sole master of a belligerent nation. Until 1938 Hitler could be dismissed as a ruthless but efficient dictator, a problem for Germany alone; after 1938 he was a threat to the whole of Europe and had set the world on a path toward cataclysmic war.

Overview


The Third Reich came of age in 1938. Hitler began the year as the leader of a right-wing coalition and ended it as the sole master of a belligerent nation. Until 1938 Hitler could be dismissed as a ruthless but efficient dictator, a problem for Germany alone; after 1938 he was a threat to the whole of Europe and had set the world on a path toward cataclysmic war. Using previously unseen archival material, acclaimed historian Giles MacDonogh breathtakingly chronicles Adolf Hitler's rise to international infamy over the course of this single year.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465009541
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
12/01/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.10(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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1938: Hitler's Gamble 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is organized by month, but for the most part is a litany of statistics, facts, and some quotes with no compelling narrative. The only chapter that is interesting is "September" with the events leading to the Munich Conference and the taking of the Sudetenland of Czechoslovakia. It seems like it was written by a different author as it was narrative and compelling. Maybe the author wrote this chapter first and submitted it to get the book published.Maybe having a chronological structure was the problem. It made the book too much of a jumble of facts and figures that jumped from topic to topic. In addition, much of the information was either overkill - trying to prove a point not developed in the beginning, or a bizarre form of name and place dropping - trying to impress how much research was done. The editor dropped the ball.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LordVader More than 1 year ago
I like the month by month account. A little buried in some of the detail, but otherwise interesting.
troutrivers More than 1 year ago
By concentrating on the single year of 1938 the author is able to write to a detail not possible in other histories. He also is able to expose the great depth of anti-semitism in 1938. Not just in Germany and Austria, but world wide. Hitler's Germany did not want its Jews....but other nations did not want them either. Forced emigration was the Nazi policy...but the author definitively exposes the fact that, around the world, no one wanted to accept the 'jewish problem'. I give 5 stars not for the author's writing style but for the fact that this is a must read for any serious student of the run up to WWII.
HistoryAce67 More than 1 year ago
The book started off somewhat dull and ended somewhat dull. I had the impression there would be more emphasis in the Nazi Germany and Hitler's actions during 1938. The chapters are also broken up on a month to month basis. I have my B.A. in History, as well as credentialed in History. I did enjoy the central part of the book; however, I expected more. It is still a decent read; but just take into consideration when starting this read that it has much more thrown into the book, than just Nazi Germany & Hitler.
ESHochman More than 1 year ago
I did not know that this work existed, and it was strictly an "impulse buy." (I was attracted by the cover, read a few pages, and made certain to carry it to the checkout counter.) A superbly written, flowing, always informative and at times riveting work, "1938" would provide a welcome education to any person interested in the events of one of the most pivotal years in history, but the work would be a special delight to students of the Second World War and the events which led up to its outbreak in Europe. Of special interest to me were the wonderfully researched and detailed descriptions of the rivalries in jealousies among the second-tier Nazis (e.g. Goering, Goebbels, Himmler, Ribbentrop), the Nazi regime's uneasy and often hostile relations with the local churches (especially the Catholic churches), the (somewhat surprising) events leading to Kristalnacht -- and how many Nazi leaders were livid at the Nazi pogrom (overwhelmingly because of its negative repercussions overseass), Adolf Eichmann's efforts to make the lives of Austrian Jews so miserable that they would emigrate, thus ridding the Reich of its "Jewish Question." (This policy, of course, being in marked contrast to the post-Wannsee Conference "Final Solution"), the torments that the Jews suffered (often described in gut-wrenching terms), and the distrust/dislike of the largely Prussian general staff towards the Nazi political leadership, which the generals often viewed with contempt. Superbly researched, this book would be a welcomed edition to the library of any student of the Second World War in particularly, and is a sad testimony to, but excellent study of, human nature and all its foibles.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the first truly negative book review I have ever given. What disturbs me the most about this book was the LACK of information given to the readers by the author. When I first picked up this book, I was actually scared knowing that once again I was going to have to re-read and learn even more about the gruesome history that Hitler and his Nazis had permanently marked the face of human history with. However, MacDonogh's way of reporting "history" during this time is condescending in its lack of detail. This author paints Hitler as child-like and prudish; a man who pouts and throws fits when he doesn't get what he wants and then just does what he wants anyways. MacDonogh presents the Nazis as simple bullies that go about taking people's money and breaking windows. This is all true, but he forgets to mention the millions of MURDERS and victims that Hitler and his Nazis are responsible for. The brutality, the violence, the pure evil of this time cannot be down played, skipped over, or soothed. This book is one of the reasons why history repeats itself!