1948
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1948

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by Yoram Kaniuk
     
 
Sixty years after fighting in Israel's War of Independence, Yoram Kaniuk tries to remember what exactly did—and did not—happen in his time as a teenage soldier in the Palmach. The result is a touchingly poignant and hauntingly beautiful memoir that the author himself considers a work of fiction, for what is memory but one's own story about the past?

Overview

Sixty years after fighting in Israel's War of Independence, Yoram Kaniuk tries to remember what exactly did—and did not—happen in his time as a teenage soldier in the Palmach. The result is a touchingly poignant and hauntingly beautiful memoir that the author himself considers a work of fiction, for what is memory but one's own story about the past?
 
Eschewing self-righteousness in favor of self-criticism, Kaniuk's book, winner of the 2010 Sapir Prize for Literature, is the tale of a younger man told by his older, wiser self—the self who realizes that wars are pointless, and that he and his friends, young men from good homes forming an offbeat band of brothers, were senseless to see glory in the prospect of dying young. But it is also a painful, shocking, and tragically relevant homage to the importance of bearing witness to the follies of the past, even—or especially—when they are one's own.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"If the prophets of the Old Testament had read Joyce, Kafka, Márquez, Conrad, and Gershom Scholem, listened to American Jazz, seen Broadway musicals, and heard Lenny Bruce, they might have sounded something like Kaniuk." —Nicole Krauss, author, Great House, The History of Love, and Man Walks Into a Room

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590176481
Publisher:
New York Review Books
Publication date:
11/27/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
190
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Yoram Kaniuk (1930-2013) was one of Israel’s leading writers. After being wounded in Israel’s 1948 War of Independence, he moved to New York for 10 years. A novelist, painter, and journalist, Kaniuk published novels, memoirs, short stories, nonfiction, and books for children and young adults. Named an Officer in France's Order of Arts and Letters in 2012, Kaniuk was also the recipient of the Méditerranée Étranger (2000), the Newman Prize (2006), the Kugel Prize for Lifetime Achievement (2008), the France-Israel Foundation Award (2010), and the Sapir Prize (2010). In 2011, he received an Honorary Doctorate from Tel Aviv University. Kaniuk’s books have been published in 20 languages.
 
Anthony Berris was born in the UK and has lived in Israel for most of his life, working as a teacher and freelance translator.

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1948 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found the book difficult to read. The narration of events were difficult for me to follow. The subject matter and portrayal of the authors feelings were probably as hectic and disjointed as the writing. I got a message of little hope for the near future of Jewish and Arab relations. I think Yoram Kaniuk was brave to recall and write this book.