1967-1970

1967-1970

4.8 10
by The Beatles
     
 

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Picking up where 1962-1966 left off, the double-album compilation 1967-1970, commonly called The Blue Album, covers the Beatles' later records, from Sgt. Pepper's through Let It Be. Like The Red Album, The Blue Album was released in the wake of a pair of widely advertised quadruple-LP

Overview

Picking up where 1962-1966 left off, the double-album compilation 1967-1970, commonly called The Blue Album, covers the Beatles' later records, from Sgt. Pepper's through Let It Be. Like The Red Album, The Blue Album was released in the wake of a pair of widely advertised quadruple-LP bootlegs, Alpha Omega, Vols. 1-2: The Story of the Beatles, which had appeared early in 1973. And like its companion volume, this set contains a mixture of hits, including singles like "Lady Madonna," "Hey Jude," and "Revolution" -- which had originally appeared only as 45s -- plus important album tracks like "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," "A Day in the Life," "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," and "Come Together," as well as orphaned tracks such as the single versions of "Let It Be" and "Get Back," which had never been on any LP before. The first two sides of the original double-LP edition carry listeners through the highlights of the psychedelic era, starting with "Strawberry Fields Forever" and "Penny Lane" and up through "Magical Mystery Tour," before returning to rock & roll territory on "Lady Madonna," "Hey Jude," and "Revolution." The second LP skims three of the more popular tracks off of the sprawling White Album (aka The Beatles) and moves into the late singles ("The Ballad of John and Yoko," "Old Brown Shoe," "Let It Be"), plus single and album highlights from Abbey Road and Let It Be. As a précis of the group's final 36 months, it's all mightily impressive, even if 1967-1970 misses several great songs. But like its predecessor, this set does capture the essence (if not the full range) of the Beatles' later recordings.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/19/2010
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
5099990674723
catalogNumber:
06747
Rank:
8795

Tracks

Disc 1

  1. Strawberry Fields Forever
  2. Penny Lane
  3. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
  4. With a Little Help From My Friends
  5. Lucy In the Sky With Diamonds
  6. A Day In The Life
  7. All You Need is Love
  8. I Am the Walrus
  9. Hello, Goodbye
  10. The Fool on the Hill
  11. Magical Mystery Tour
  12. Lady Madonna
  13. Hey Jude
  14. Revolution

Disc 2

  1. Back in the U.S.S.R.
  2. While My Guitar Gently Weeps
  3. Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
  4. Get Back
  5. Don't Let Me Down
  6. The Ballad of John and Yoko
  7. Old Brown Shoe
  8. Here Comes the Sun
  9. Come Together
  10. Something
  11. Octopus's Garden
  12. Let It Be
  13. Across the Universe
  14. The Long and Winding Road

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1967-1970 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Walterama More than 1 year ago
Like the remastered version of the Beatles 1962-1966 (red), the remastered version of the Beatles 1967-1970 (blue) sounds bigger, better, and louder than the previous c.d. in 1993. If you are planning to buy this remastered version, then start saving your money. As the Beatles would sing, "Christmas Time is Here Again."
lharty More than 1 year ago
came quickly
glauver 7 months ago
Few groups' careers divide so neatly. The Strawberry Fields Forever/Penny Lane single inaugurated the Beatles' switch to studio technicians from a touring band. From that point on the growing dissension was evident. Paul McCartney was moving toward a pop orientation and John Lennon focused on being a counterculture icon. Meanwhile, George Harrison and Ringo Starr grew as songwriters. McCartney and Lennon piled on so many extra instruments and effects that, at times, the group identity was lost. Many of the songs are classics, but the pretensions sometimes mar the proceedings. By the end they moved back toward a simpler sound, but it was too late. The Beatles 1962-1966 could have benefited from a few more songs; a couple omissions could have improved 1967-1970.
SoLoveLy More than 1 year ago
Never gets old
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a good album!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Clicquet More than 1 year ago
When I was 5, went to see "Help"{the film.}Went back 3 Times! Why? Teen~age girls standing and screaming at the film screen! Fast~forward to Mr. Ed Sullivan Show. The Last Time Ever Saw The Beatles sing. I dragged the T.V. to parent's bed~room. Mother asked, "What are you doing?" Said,"The Beatles will Never sing together ever again".Out of the mouth of Babes. The song{s} began.Still remember so hauntingly~"Let it Be". I cried as we sat on the bed and watched. My young Soul just 'knew'.The void everlasting.I still feel the tug when "Here Comes the Sun" is heard.Smiling through Tears.Now, the knowledge is Mute. Was John Lennon the One who began this Band of Four or Paul Mac~Cartney? Inside the church that day the two met, no one will truly understand. Now, the Angels Know.We mere Mortals are un~privledged. They just never knew the Words are what made them accessible.Not the hair, suits or mayhem that ensued.Deeply Missed.The Blokes were too Self~Conscious or Self~Involved to understand It was the Words And Music!