1969: The Year Everything Changed

1969: The Year Everything Changed

4.1 15
by Rob Kirkpatrick
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1602393664

ISBN-13: 9781602393660

Pub. Date: 01/26/2009

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing


In 1969, man landed on the moon; the “Miracle Mets” captivated sports fans; students took over college campuses and demonstrators battled police; America witnessed the Woodstock music festival; Hollywood produced Easy Rider; Kurt Vonnegut published Slaughterhouse-Five; punk music was born; and there was murder at Altamont Speedway.

Overview


In 1969, man landed on the moon; the “Miracle Mets” captivated sports fans; students took over college campuses and demonstrators battled police; America witnessed the Woodstock music festival; Hollywood produced Easy Rider; Kurt Vonnegut published Slaughterhouse-Five; punk music was born; and there was murder at Altamont Speedway. Compelling, timely, and a blast to read, 1969 chronicles the year in culture and society, sports, music, film, politics, and technology. This rich, comprehensive history is perfect for those who survived 1969 or for those who simply want to feel as though they did.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781602393660
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
01/26/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.20(d)

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1969 4.1 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Finally, a book about a fascinating year in our country's history! 1969 was a year that challenged, changed, revolutionized, and entertained our nation, from politics, sports, music, the moon landing, the Vietnam war, its accompanying protests, Woodstock and so much more. Not only did it transition the 60's decade into the 70's decade, but many of the changes and influences are still felt today. Whether you were a part of 1969 or not, you will want to capture the feeling of this pivotal year. Once you start reading 1969, The Year Everything Changed, you will not want to put it down!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's about time someone wrote a book on this amazing year. '1969' delves deep into what the author calls the zeitgeist or "time spirit" of the year and recreates the feeling of living through the most fascinating year of a most fascinating decade. Think of it - in the same year, America witnessed the moon landing, Charles Manson, Woodstock, Joe Namath's guaranteed Super Bowl upset of the Colts, the "miracle" Mets, historic tours from the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin, Midnight Cowboy and Easy Rider, Oh Calcutta and Hair, so many classic albums and films. This is a fine addition to literature on recent American history.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book starts out well and Kirkpatrick clearly shows why 1969 is the year everything changed. Its an interesting look at social history. I felt that there was too much emphasis on the gory details l about the Manson and Zodiac killings. I skimmed most of the chapters on baseball, but a fan would probably enjoy them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Zed1955 More than 1 year ago
Anything you want to know about 1969, this book is for you. Really great read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was quite a year. Glad to read the history of 1969.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was the year I entered High school, and this book brought back all kinds of memories
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bought this for anniversary gift. Receiver Loved it.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an incredibly detailed and fascinating history of an important year. The author captures the spirit of living through an amazing 12-month period in America. "1969, The Year Everything Changed" is the first and only book to tell the story of this pivotal year!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book (actually the entire trilogy) because I wondered what made it worth turning into a film. I'm still not certain. It was an interesting take on the now almost cliched genre of dystopic literature, but over the life of the series, it just didn't hold up. There was really no good reason for the characters to go through all the travails they experienced in the books. Yes, there was a weak attempt at an explanation, but it doesn't even really make scientific sense. It's so far beyond plausibility (and remember plausible world building is what makes or breaks great fantasy or sci-fi) that I just stopped reading all the non-stop disasters and skipped to the end to try to figure out where the author was going with all the sound and fury. Even then it resembled the "and then I woke up and it was all a dream" scenario that is often the crutch that supports a not very well-thought-out plotline. A better story would have explored the world beyond the Maze...and that's all I'll say on that because of spoilers. Lastly, don't believe the hype that casts this as another Hunger Games or even Divergent. It doesn't really even come close.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is neither the 1st nor only book on this topic. Moreover I find the 1st few reviews to sound as if they were written by the same hand.