1989: Democratic Revolutions at the Cold War's End: A Brief History with Documents / Edition 1

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Overview

A series of democratic transformations in the 1980s ended the cold war and ushered in the present era. This volume by Padraic Kenney uses six case studies from this period — Poland, the Philippines, Chile, South Africa, Ukraine, and China — to explore common characteristics of global political change while highlighting the differing strategies and perspectives of the people who sought to free themselves from dictatorship. A general introduction to the volume examines key trends in the decades leading up to the changes, tracing the paths that dictatorships and opposition movements took in their fateful confrontations. The first chapter with documents surveys the central ideas of this age of democratic, nonviolent revolution, and sets a framework for considering the case studies in the chapters that follow. The documents in each case study give voice to celebrated and uncelebrated participants alike — from Nelson Mandela and Mikhail Gorbachev to Chinese hunger strikers and an ordinary Filipino activist — and provide students with an opportunity to compare histories. Photographs, document headnotes, a chronology, questions to consider, and a selected bibliography aid students’ understanding of this transformative period.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312487669
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 12/8/2009
  • Series: Bedford Cultural Editions Series
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 593,695
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Padraic Kenney (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is Professor of History at Indiana University, where he teaches courses on Eastern European and Polish History as well as on political protest and the experience of communism. His work as a writer and a teacher has been shaped by a desire to understand the dynamics of communist societies, in particular those of Eastern Europe. He has lived and researched in a number of countries, among them Poland, Ukraine, and South Africa. He is the author of many articles and books, including Wroclawskie zadymy (2007), The Burdens of Freedom: Eastern Europe Since 1989 (2006), A Carnival of Revolution: Central Europe, 1989 (2002), and Rebuilding Poland: Workers and Communists, 1945-1950 (1997).

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Table of Contents

Foreword
Preface 
List of Illustrations 
         
PART ONE. INTRODUCTION: CAUSES, COMPARISONS,
  AND CONNECTIONS
    Origins of an Era
    The Contours of a Revolutionary Wave
    Whom Were They Fighting?
    The Paths Toward Revolution
 
PART TWO. THE DOCUMENTS
Chapter One: New Ideas of Democracy and Dissent 
    1. Václav Havel, The Power of the Powerless, 1978
    2. Wei Jingsheng, The Fifth Modernization: Democracy,
          December 1978
    3. Desmond Tutu, Change or Illusion?, March 1980
    4. Mehdi Bazargan, Religion and Liberty, 1983
    5. Julieta Kirkwood, Feminism’s Time, 1983
    6. Aung San Suu Kyi, In Quest of Democracy and Freedom
          from Fear, 1988–1989
    7. Mikhail Gorbachev, On Socialist Democracy,
          January 1987
 
Chapter Two: Poland, 1982–1989
    8. The Solidarity Program, October 1981
    9. Adam Michnik, On Resistance, 1982
    10. Waldemar Fydrych, The Revolution of the Elves,
             June 1987
    11. The Hardest Thing to Overcome Was Our Own
            Foolishness…, June 1988
    12. Jacek Kuron, Instead of Revolution, March 8, 1989
 
Chapter Three: The Philippines, 1983–1986       
    13. Primer of the “Justice for Aquino, Justice for All”
            Movement, September 1983
    14. Jaime Sin, Guidelines on Christian Conduct During
            Elections, December 28, 1985
    15. The Civil Disobedience Campaign, February 1986   
    16. Ledivina V. Cariño, The Revolution of 1986: A Personal
            Story, 1986 
 
Chapter Four: Chile, 1982–1988
    17. Los de Alvear, The Contest, 1982
    18. Sebastián Acevedo, Movement Against Torture, Protest
            Against El Mercurio, November 21, 1983
    19. Gabriel Valdés, Speech at Democratic Alliance Rally,
            November 21, 1985
    20. Posters from the “NO” Campaign, 1988
 
Chapter Five: South Africa, 1983–1994
    21. African National Congress, On Negotiations,
            October 9, 1987
    22. United Democratic Front, Ya, The Community Is the Main
            Source of Power,  March 1986
    23. Alison Ozinsky, Purple Reign, September 1989
    24. Nelson Mandela, We Are Committed to Building a Single
            Nation in Our Country, February 25, 1990
 
Chapter Six: Ukraine, 1987–1991
    25. Vyacheslav Chornovil, Open Letter to Mikhail
            Gorbachev, 1987
    26. Ukrainian Helsinki Group, Atomic Evil Out of Ukraine,
            November 1988
    27. Founding of the Native Language Association,
            June 13, 1988
    28. Ivan Drach, The Political Situation in the Ukraine and
            Rukh’s Task, October 1990
 
Chapter Seven: China, 1986–1989
    29. Fang Lizhi, Democracy, Reform, and Modernization,
            November 18, 1986
    30. Government Representatives Meet with Students,
            April 29, 1989
    31. Hunger Strikers’ Announcement, May 12, 1989
    32. Chai Ling, I Am Still Alive, June 8, 1989
 
Appendixes
    A Chronology of Democratic Revolutions (1968–1995)
    Questions for Consideration
    Selected Bibliography 
Index

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