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20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

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Overview

Follow along on this fantastic voyage as Professor Arronax, Ned, and Beth set out to capture a terrifying sea monster--before it captures them.

A deadly and huge sea monster is sinking ships. Three men--a French scientist, his trusty sidekick, and a Canadian harpoonist are thrown from the deck of their American warship. A door opens on the side of the monster, and they are taken inside the greatest submarine in the world, the top-secret Nautilus commanded by a madman...

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20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (Collins Classics)

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Overview

Follow along on this fantastic voyage as Professor Arronax, Ned, and Beth set out to capture a terrifying sea monster--before it captures them.

A deadly and huge sea monster is sinking ships. Three men--a French scientist, his trusty sidekick, and a Canadian harpoonist are thrown from the deck of their American warship. A door opens on the side of the monster, and they are taken inside the greatest submarine in the world, the top-secret Nautilus commanded by a madman who will take them 20,000 leagues into the depths.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up

A large sea monster, believed to resemble a narwhal, is roaming the seas and has destroyed over 200 ships that dared to cross its path. French Professor Pierre Aronnax, a distinguished marine biologist, has set his sights on killing this "gigantic cetacean." He and his faithful assistant, Conseil, accept an invitation to join an expedition aboard the Abraham Lincoln, an American frigate. The monster is finally sited and a battle ensues, resulting in Aronnax, Conseil, and a harpooner being tossed overboard and rescued by Nemo, captain of the Nautilus, a large submarine, which had been mistakenly thought to be a sea monster. For ten months, the three men sail with Nemo, a "terrible avenger, a perfect archangel of hatred." They are enthralled with the captivating scenery, discover new sea creatures and lost cities, and become trapped in a iceberg. Jules Verne's classic offers a perfect blend of suspense, adventure, and excitement that will entice even the most reluctant readers. This audiobook also contains a companion ebook-a 272-page printable PDF file complete with a full table of contents and index-and an interesting mini biography of Verne. Michael Prichard provides a stalwart narration; his rich, deep voice offers subtle changes for each character. An essential science fiction classic and a great choice for libraries in need of updating their collections.-Cheryl Preisendorfer, Twinsburg City Schools, OH

Publishers Weekly - Audio
Verne’s classic journey into the ocean follows professor Pierre Aronnax and his two companions as they are captured by Capt. Nemo and find themselves trapped aboard the Nautilus, a high-powered submarine that traverses about the world revealing the mysteries of the sea. James Frain provides clear and crisp narration. His intonation and tone are good, but not good enough to overcome the tedious cataloguing of every crustacean, fish, and shell that Verne includes. Equally problematic, Frain stumbles through some of his reading and has trouble maintaining the voices he provides for the different characters, particularly Nemo, whose voice is quite inconsistent. This, at times, can lead to listener confusion. While this audiobook is, on the whole, enjoyable, it doesn’t stand up to other Listening Library productions. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
"Prichard provides a stalwart narration; his rich, deep voice offers subtle changes for each character." —-School Library Journal
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789626342336
  • Publisher: Naxos Audiobooks Ltd.
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Abridged

Meet the Author

Jules Verne

Jules Verne, born at Nantes, France, in 1828, of legal and seafaring stock, was the author of innumerable adventure stories that combined a vivid imagination with a gift for popularizing science. Although he studied law at Paris, he devoted his life entirely to writing. His most popular stories, besides 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1870), include: Five Weeks in a Balloon (1863), Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), A Trip to the Moon (1865), Around the World in Eighty Days (1872), and Michael Strogoff (1876). In addition, he was the author of a number of successful plays, as well as a popular history of exploration from Phoenician times to the mid-nineteenth century, The Discovery of the Earth (1878-80). After a long and active career in literature, Jules Verne died at Amiens, France, in 1905.

Biography

The creator of the roman scientifique, the popular literary genre known today as science fiction, Jules Gabriel Verne was born in the port town of Nantes, France, in 1828. His father, Pierre, was a prominent lawyer, and his mother, Sophie, was from a successful ship-building family. Despite his father's wish that he pursue law, young Jules was fascinated by the sea and all things foreign and adventurous. Legend holds that at age eleven he ran away from school to work aboard a ship bound for the West Indies but was caught by his father shortly after leaving port. Jules developed an abiding love of science and language from a young age. He studied geology, Latin, and Greek in secondary school, and frequently visited factories, where he observed the workings of industrial machines. These visits likely inspired his desire for scientific plausibility in his writing and perhaps informed his depictions of the submarine Nautilus and the other seemingly fantastical inventions he described.

After completing secondary school, Jules studied law in Paris, as his father had before him. However, during the two years he spent earning his degree, he developed more consuming interests. Through family connections, he entered Parisian literary circles and met many of the distinguished writers of the day. Inspired in particular by novelists Victor Hugo and Alexandre Dumas (father and son), Verne began writing his own works. His poetry, plays, and short fiction achieved moderate success, and in 1852 he became secretary of the Théâtre lyrique. In 1857 he married Honorine Morel, a young widow with two children. Seeking greater financial security, he took a position as a stockbroker with the Paris firm Eggly and Company. However, he reserved his mornings for writing. Baudelaire's recently published French translation of the works of Edgar Allan Poe, as well as the days Verne spent researching points of science in the library, inspired him to write a new sort of novel: the roman scientifique. His first such novel, Five Weeks in a Balloon, was an immediate success and earned him a publishing contract with the important editor Pierre-Jules Hetzel.

For the rest of his life, Verne published an average of two novels a year; the fifty-four volumes published during his lifetime, collectively known as Voyages Extraordinaires, include his best-known works, Around the World in Eighty Days and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. Begun in 1865 and published to huge success in 1869, Twenty Thousand Leagues has been translated into 147 languages and adapted into dozens of films. The novel also holds the distinction of describing a submarine twenty-five years before one was actually constructed. As a tribute to Verne, the first electric and nuclear submarines were named Nautilus. In 1872 Verne settled in Amiens with his family. During the next several years he traveled extensively on his yachts, visiting such locales as North Africa, Gibraltar, Scotland, and Ireland. In 1886 Verne's mentally ill nephew shot him in the leg, and the author was lame thereafter. This incident, as well as the tumultuous political climate in Europe, marked a change in Verne's perspective on science, exploration, and industry. Although not as popular as his early novels, Verne's later works are in many ways as prescient. Touching on such subjects as the ill effects of the oil industry, the negative influence of missionaries in the South Seas, and the extinction of animal species, they speak to concerns that remain urgent in our own time.

Verne continued writing actively throughout his life, despite failing health, the loss of family members, and financial troubles. At his death in 1905 his desk drawers contained the manuscripts of several new novels. Jules Verne is buried in the Madeleine Cemetery in Amiens.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.

Good To Know

In 1848, Verne got his start writing librettos for operettas.

When Verne's father found out that his son would rather write than study law, he cut him off financially, and Jules was forced to support himself as a stockbroker -- a job he hated but was fairly good at. During this period, he sought advice and inspiration from authors Alexandre Dumas and Victor Hugo.

Verne stands as the most translated novelist in the world -- 148 languages, according to UNESCO statistics.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      February 8, 1828
    2. Place of Birth:
      Nantes, France
    1. Date of Death:
      March 24, 1905
    2. Place of Death:
      Amiens, France
    1. Education:
      Nantes lycée and law studies in Paris

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

A Shifting Reef

The year 1866 was marked by a strange event, an unexplainable occurrence which is undoubtedly still fresh in everyone's memory. Those living in coastal towns or in the interior of continents were aroused by all sorts of rumors; but it was seafaring people who were particularly excited. Merchants, shipowners, skippers and masters of Europe and America, naval officers of all countries and the various governments of both continents were deeply concerned over the matter.

Several ships had recently met at sea “an enormous thing,” a long slender object which was sometimes phosphorescent and which was infinitely larger and faster than a whale.

The facts concerning this apparition, entered in various logbooks, agreed closely with one another as to the structure of the object or creature in question, the incredible speed of its movements, the surprising power of its locomotion and the strange life with which it seemed endowed. If it was a member of the whale family, it was larger than any so far classified by scientists. Neither Cuvier, Lacépède, Dumeril nor Quatrefages would have admitted that such a monster could exist--unless they had seen it with their own scientists' eyes.

Taking an average of observations made at different times'and rejecting those timid evaluations which said the object was only two hundred feet long, and also putting aside those exaggerated opinions which said it was a mile wide and three miles long'one could nevertheless conclude that this phenomenal creature was considerably larger than anything at that time recognized by ichthyologists'if it existed at all.

But it didexist--there was no denying this fact any longer--and considering the natural inclination of the human brain toward objects of wonder, one can understand the excitement produced throughout the world by this supernatural apparition. In any case, the idea of putting it into the realm of fiction had to be abandoned.

On July 20, 1866, the steamer Governor Higginson of the Calcutta and Burnach Steam Navigation Company had encountered this moving mass five miles east of the Australian coast. Captain Baker first thought he had sighted an unknown reef; he was even getting ready to plot its exact position when two columns of water spurted out of the inexplicable object and rose with a loud whistling noise to a height of a hundred and fifty feet. So, unless the reef contained a geyser, the Governor Higginson was quite simply in the presence of an unknown aquatic mammal, spurting columns of water mixed with air and vapor out of its blowholes.

A similar thing was observed on July 23 of the same year in Pacific waters, by the Christopher Columbus of the West India and Pacific Steam Navigation Company. This extraordinary creature could therefore move from one place to another with surprising speed, since within a space of only three days, the Governor Higginson and the Christopher Columbus had sighted it at two points on the globe separated by more than 2100 nautical miles.

Two weeks later and six thousand miles from this last spot, the Helvetia of the Compagnie Nationale and the Shannon of the Royal Mail Steamship Company, passing on opposite courses in that part of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, signaled one another that they had sighted the monster at 42° 15' N. Lat. and 60° 35' W. Long. In this simultaneous observation they felt able to judge the creature's minimum length at more than 350 feet, since it was larger than both ships each of which measured 330 feet over-all. But the largest whales, the Kulammak and Umgullick that live in the waters around the Aleutian Islands, never exceed 180 feet in length, if that much.

These reports arriving one after the other, with fresh observations made on board the liner Le Pereire, a collision between the Etna of the Inman Line and the monster, an official report drawn up by the officers of the French frigate Normandie, and a very reliable sighting made by Commodore Fitz-James' staff on board the Lord Clyde, greatly stirred public opinion. In lighthearted countries, people made jokes about it, but in serious practical-minded countries, such as England, America and Germany, it was a matter of grave concern.

In every big city the monster became the fashion: it was sung in cafés, derided in newspapers and discussed on the stage. Scandal sheets had a marvelous opportunity to print all kinds of wild stories. Even ordinary newspapers--always short of copy--printed articles about every huge, imaginary monster one could think of, from the white whale, the terrible “Moby Dick” of the far north, to the legendary Norse kraken whose tentacles could entwine a five-hundred-ton ship and drag it to the bottom. Reports of ancient times were mentioned, the opinions of Aristotle and Pliny who admitted to the existence of such monsters, along with those of the Norwegian bishop, Pontoppidan, Paul Heggede and finally Mr. Harrington, whose good faith no one can question when he claims to have seen, while on board the Castillan in 1857, that enormous serpent which until then had been seen in no waters but those of the old Paris newspaper, the Constitutionnel.

It was then that in scientific societies and journals an interminable argument broke out between those who believed in the monster and those who did not. The “question of the monster” had everyone aroused. Newspapermen, who always pretend to be on the side of scientists and against those who live by their imagination, spilled gallons of ink during this memorable campaign; and some even spilled two or three drops of blood, after arguments that had started over sea serpents and ended in the most violent personal insults.

For six months this war was waged with varying fortune. Serious, weighty articles were published by the Brazilian Geographical Institute, the Royal Scientific Academy of Berlin, the British Association and the Smithsonian Institute in Washington; others appeared in the Indian Archipelago, in Abbé Moigno's Cosmos, in Petermann's Mittheilungen and in the science sections of all the important newspapers of France and other countries.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Copyright © by Jules Verne. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 177 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(108)

4 Star

(34)

3 Star

(19)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 177 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Exciting adventure thriller!

    So I read this book back when I was in middle school and I just remember being absolutely fascinated by it. Jules Verne weaves a tale of adventure and danger, exploring the darkest unknown depths of the oceans in a spectacular way. I now read it at least once every year, and it continues to be my favorite book. It's perfect for long car drives, plane flights, and rainy days. It's a quick page-turner that makes it impossible to put down. Jules Verne really likes to use lots of scientific references and vocabulary, so that may take some getting used to for some readers, especially younger ones, but it's all worth, I promise.

    10 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 6, 2012

    A Middle School Student's Perspective

    A Book Review of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
    By Roger, Grade 7, Yangon International School
    Imagine traveling underwater to explore the sea for an entire life without even coming back to land! Who would live in an underwater world? What might be the hidden dangers? Are there hidden mysteries? The novel, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne, one of the most translated authors in the world, also known as “Father of Science Fiction”, is a science fiction book that contains adventures, undiscovered mysteries, and secrets to discover, from the underwater world!
    The story begins with a transoceanic cruise, Abraham Lincoln, tries to hunt the mysterious monster threatening many people in the sea. However, the crew is unable to discover any clue about the monster. That is until the monster bumps into the ship, causes two people to go overboard. After the monster disappeared once again, the two survivors, Professor Aronnax and Counseil, wander around the surrounding area, and discover one more survivor, Ned. Unfortunately, with minimal hope, the three survivors consider themselves dead until: they are stepping on the monster, Nautilus, the futuristic submarine. Nautilus immediately rises above the surface of the water, subjugates the survivors under the control of Captain Nemo, the person that wishes to own his own mini world. His main goal is to explore the sea, the motherland of many dangerous and harmful creatures, along with the three survivors, with the new adventure waiting for them.
    Verne’s development of the plot was amusing and creative. Even though the story didn’t have any critical theme, graphic and invigorating structure of the story line and the cordial usage of the sentences caused the story to became full of amazing entertainments. Verne also did a terrific job in creating a rare and unusual plot in an underwater. For the characters, Verne decided to add completely different attitudes and behaviors to each of the characters that made them unique and astonishing. As for Captain Nemo, a unique character with a strange attitude, can be both friendly and mean. Even though he wasn’t pleased being hunted at the first place, he still treated the three survivors as if they were friends. On the other side, he feared that his secret would be spread, and decided to subjugate them and never let them leave the crew. His reaction forced the survivors to make an indeterminable decision, and also left them to be bewildered.
    Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea was mainly designed for the teenage readers and some adults that love science fiction. From scale 1 (low) to 5 (high), I rate this a four because the entire story was filled with excitements described by detailed and cordial passages. Besides, the vocabulary usages of the words were not very difficult, so it is easier for young readers to enjoy.

    9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    My fav. book of all time!

    I'm a teenager and when I started to read this book, I couldn't put it down. I would recommend this book to anyone who truly loves well-written books. What else can I say? It's a classic. (This probably isn't for anyone who has difficulty in reading or doesn't like enigmatic [like that one] words)

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2011

    Awesome book!!

    I loved this when I first read it several years ago and when I got it on my nook it was even better!!! Very entertaining. Must read.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2012

    Interesting take on man in solitude

    This story is a classic, so don't expect any modern allusions to Twilight. Nor does it involve love affairs, severe violence, or even a school for witchcraft and wizardry. What Jules Verne does offer is a description of a fantastical world that lies below humankind all along. Sometimes explanations and imagery drag on, but it definitely isn't lacking in detail. The story is interesting and suspenseful. It may not be to your taste if you're more into easy reads, but it is especially wonderful if you're turned on to anything involving underwater life, science, or technology. In that case, this book is definitely for you. The take on man in solitude provides interest as well, giving readers a new scope of society.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2011

    Another great read byJulesVern

    Such a good book I finshed it in 3 days highly recomend

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Want to buy

    I got my nook for christmas this year and i really want to buy this book!!!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2011

    look foreward to it

    I have not read, but I just now that I will like it.

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2013

    Better than the hunger games

    Its even better than the hunger games im soooo into it some times i cant put it down

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Mind thilling

    Just amazing i can not stand how good this is from ice to desert an underwater adventure to the worlds best storys
    Nobody can rate this book 1 ,2,3 and 4 stars
    (Only five)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Lo Peolpe People say it id Webkinzlover

    Love it got this nook for christmas today and it is great i really want to buy it!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2012

    AWOSOME

    I j o o

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    An excellent edition

    20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne is a clas­sic sci­ence fic­tion novel pub­lished in 1870. The book¿s orig­i­nal title Vingt mille lieues sous les mers, the lit­eral trans­la­tion would be "Seas" which might imply the seven seas.

    The story is told from the view point of Pro­fes­sor Pierre Aron­nax, a famous French marine biol­o­gist. The pro­fes­sor accepts an invi­ta­tion to join an expe­di­tion to destroy a sea mon­ster who is sink­ing ships. Along for the ride come Cana­dian har­poon­ist Ned Land and Con­seil, the professor¿s servant.

    The expe­di­tion fails, the mon­ster sinks it and the Pro­fes­sor, Ned Land and Con­seil find them­selves at the mercy of Cap­tain Nemo, who com­mands The Nau­tilus, a sub­ma­rine the likes of which have never been seen.

    I have read 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne in two lan­guages and sev­eral ver­sions. I have to say that this trans­la­tion beats them all.

    The book shows Verne¿s genius which is tough to trans­late, the char­ac­ters come alive on the pages and the adven­tures they go through are excit­ing. The comedic tone and even psy­chol­ogy show well in this won­der­ful translation.

    As in the pre­vi­ous ver­sions I have read, there are many ¿lists¿ and descrip­tions of the ocean life. I have to say that I did skimmed through the lists but read the descrip­tive parts enthu­si­as­ti­cally. With the excep­tion of intri­cate sci­en­tific names, which lend cred­i­bil­ity to this fan­tasy, I found the book absorb­ing and engross­ing. I¿m glad I read it again.

    While sub­marines today are com­mon place and almost any­one of can go and visit one (there are sev­eral older sub­marines which one can go on), the fan­tas­tic voy­ages and imag­i­na­tion are inspir­ing today as they were in 1870.

    What I love about this book is that the trans­la­tors took their time to write an excel­lent intro­duc­tion and, best of all, won­der­ful foot­notes which, as I said time and time again, make a trans­lated book into a cul­tural expe­ri­ence and raises the level of enjoy­ment by mul­ti­ple degrees.

    Not many peo­ple are aware, but almost a whole quar­ter of the book was lit­er­ally lost in trans­la­tion. This won­der­ful edi­tion, trans­lated by Water James Miller and Fred­er­ick Paul Wal­ter, restores those pages as well as

    If you ever won­dered what the big hoopla is about Jules Verne, read this ver­sion and you¿ll find out.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2013

    Shut up RPers

    This is not a place for roleplaying! It's for reviewing 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Stop being such disrespectful pricks to this piece of literature and move your RP to somewhere appropriate.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2012

    Sam

    Slips out

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2012

    Xavier

    *taps his glass to everyone's.* To the greatest friends, the most confusing randomness. To being epic homeschoolers and even epic(er) people. To usm the chatters of the roleplay world who have brains to think, smarts to listen, and wisdom to see. *he drinks to his toast.*

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2012

    Cali....here here xaier

    Siles alittle

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2012

    Neil

    Nope

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2012

    Adventure tale

    It is a very good book and it has a marvelous plot that will keep you wanting to read until the end.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 19, 2012

    recommended to some people-but it was an ok book

    20000 leagues under the sea is a very good book. The story tells of action and adventure. It also tells about of a mad sea captain traped aboured a submarine with a bunch of French professors. The adventures incloode uncovering Atalantis, finding unseen tombs. And getting clues of a giant sea squid.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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