2015 Complete Runner's Day-by-Day Log Calendar
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2015 Complete Runner's Day-by-Day Log Calendar

2.0 1
by Marty Jerome
     
 
This spiral-bound calendar/log is a perennial favorite of runners of all skill levels.

 This log's useful format includes space for recording times and miles and for making notes. The full-color photographs, valuable tips, and inspirational quotes motivate the beginner and experienced runner alike. The insightful monthly essays by Marty Jerome separate this

Overview

This spiral-bound calendar/log is a perennial favorite of runners of all skill levels.

 This log's useful format includes space for recording times and miles and for making notes. The full-color photographs, valuable tips, and inspirational quotes motivate the beginner and experienced runner alike. The insightful monthly essays by Marty Jerome separate this running log from the pack.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449451479
Publisher:
Andrews McMeel Publishing
Publication date:
07/22/2014
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)

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2015 Complete Runner's Day-by-Day Log Calendar 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
yogidancer More than 1 year ago
As a long-time runner and avid reader of fitness books, I was initially pleased to have received as a gift the book The Complete Runner&rsquo;s Day-by-Day Log by Marty Jerome. While I would never actually write my training information in this bulky calendar book, especially when all my workout data is recorded and entered via an app on my smartphone, I like that the book is full of great tips for runners, and has many inspirational quotes and stories. Unfortunately, there is one page-long essay in the book that strikes the wrong tone for me, and I think for many people outside my profession. The essay is at March in the calendar-formatted book, and it is titled &ldquo;CLERGY&rdquo;. It is a strong opinion piece disparaging the qualifications and benefits of coaches, fitness trainers, and preachers. He starts off equating trainers with preachers, and says that they have &ldquo;dubious credentials&rdquo; and that their talent is more from &ldquo;force of personality&rdquo; than formal education. This seems odd and incredulous coming from an author of training books who doesn&rsquo;t list his credentials or experience anywhere, even on bookseller websites. Perhaps in the past it was common to find trainers and coaches who had minimal education, but in the past 20 years there has been great growth in the fitness industry and education and certification standards have improved tremendously. Does that mean you can&rsquo;t still find incompetent, or even as he says &ldquo;corrupt&rdquo;, trainers? Sure. But I believe that in general they are far and few between. Just as with any other professional you are thinking of using, such as a doctor, lawyer, accountant, you should ask to see the credentials of the person you are considering of hiring, and research or ask around about their reputation. In the essay, Mr. Jerome agrees that all elite athletes use coaches and that they fill many beneficial roles. However, among the roles he lists are &ldquo;scold&rdquo;, and &ldquo;slave driver&rdquo;. I would not list those as part of my job description, nor do I think would other trainers. The most important role of a coach or trainer not listed by the author is that of teacher or mentor. Many coaches/trainers are ex-athletes who bring years of experience practicing the sport on a first-hand basis. Many also have real world experience on how to live a fit and healthy lifestyle. This goes beyond formal education and can be invaluable for a student.  I think it is apparent the Mr. Jerome has never worked with a good coach and perhaps has some personal issues with them. Unfortunately, he misses one other very important aspect of a good coach or trainer &ndash; that is that they can help you improve your performance. This is what most runners and fitness enthusiasts are looking for. Research has shown that people who work with coaches/trainers achieve better and faster results. And it isn&rsquo;t because of their &ldquo;sales skills&rdquo;. He is right to advise his readers to be discerning and to not put too much into their expectations when using a coach/trainer. I would also agree that one shouldn&rsquo;t become too dependent on a trainer or feel tied down to them. Self-empowerment is part of what I try to imbue to my clients, and I teach them how to be able to train on their own with guidance, but not necessarily personal attention all the time. I also agree that some trainers are better at different specialties. However, the more experienced your teacher/coach/trainer is, the more knowledge and expertise about a variety of things they will have and be able to share with you. And, if you are lucky enough to find a really good coach/trainer &ndash; one that is a mentor and teacher and motivator, then just as when you have found a really good doctor, lawyer, accountant, etc., you would be wise to hang on to that relationship as long as you can.  In closing, Mr. Jerome says, &ldquo;Truth is, in worldly progress, coaches and preachers can offer only a little.&rdquo; I assume he includes the &ldquo;little&rdquo; contributions made by coaches Knute Rockne, Vince Lombardi, Phil Jackson, etc, and preachers like Martin Luther King.