2095 (The Time Warp Trio Series #5) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Everyone’s favorite time-travelers are changing their styles! The Time Warp Trio series now features a brand-new, eye-catching design, sure to appeal to longtime fans, and those new to Jon Scieszka’s wacky brand of humor.


While on a field trip to New York's Museum of Natural History, Joe, Sam, and Fred travel one hundred years into the future, where they encounter robots, anti-gravity disks, and their own grandchildren.

...
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2095 (The Time Warp Trio Series #5)

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Overview

Everyone’s favorite time-travelers are changing their styles! The Time Warp Trio series now features a brand-new, eye-catching design, sure to appeal to longtime fans, and those new to Jon Scieszka’s wacky brand of humor.


While on a field trip to New York's Museum of Natural History, Joe, Sam, and Fred travel one hundred years into the future, where they encounter robots, anti-gravity disks, and their own grandchildren.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Dr. Judy Rowen
This installment of the adventures of the Time Warp Trio has Fred, Joe and Sam blasting into the future when they get bored during a class trip to the museum. They find themselves ill-prepared for the future-they don't know how to evade the Sellbot threatening them with its laser, they don't have antigravity disks, and they aren't dyed unusual colors like the other New Yorkers they find. At least Ray's Pizza is the same. How will they return to 1995? And who are those three girls who keep chasing them? Each chapter ends in a cliffhanger that will urge the most reluctant reader to forge ahead.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101075722
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 4/26/2004
  • Series: Time Warp Trio Series , #5
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 290,395
  • Age range: 7 - 9 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jon Scieszka

Multiple award-winning author Jon Scieszka grew up in Flint, Michigan, the second oldest and the nicest of six boys. Jon went to school at Culver Military Academy in Indiana where he was a Lieutenant; Albion College in Michigan where he studied to be a doctor; and Columbia University in New York, where he got a M.F.A. in fi ction. He taught elementary school in New York for ten years in a variety of positions. In addition to his work as an author, Jon also runs a web-based literacy program called “Guys Read” that is designed to encourage boys, particularly reluctant readers, to get involved with books. Currently, he lives in Brooklyn, NY with his wife and two kids.

Recently, Jon was named the country’s first National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, a joint effort of the Library of Congress and the Children’s Book Council. During his two-year role as Ambassador, he will act as a spokesperson for children’s literature, speaking to groups of parents, teachers, and children to encourage the importance of reading.


LANE SMITH was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma on August
25th, 1959. His family moved to Corona,
California when he was three, but spent the better part of every summer back in Oklahoma. "My family would take the old Route 66 highway. I think that's where my bizarre sense of design comes from. Once you've seen a 100-foot cement buffalo on top of a donut-stand in the middle of nowhere, you're never the same."



Lane has one brother, whose name is Shane. "Shane and Lane. My Mom thought this was funny.
Really. A real hoot. However, HER brothers were named Dub, Cubby, Leo and Billy- Joe! My
Dad's brothers were Tom and Jerry! I SWEAR this is true!"



"I had a great childhood. We lived in the foothills, and my brother and I spent all of our after-school time exploring, building forts, collecting lizards, etc. My favorite time of year was
Fall, when the wind would start up and the air grew colder. I lived for Halloween and I loved the old Universal studios' monster movies. Shane and I would watch them, then read each other horror stories with titles like Tales to Tremble By. The foothills were full of dry bushes and desert trees and in the Fall we'd get a lot of creepy looking tumbleweeds blowing through our backyard at night. I used to lay awake in bed and imagine what wild adventures might be happening in the hills. I think some of those memories later evolved into THE BIG PETS.



Lane supplemented the money his parents were putting towards his college tuition by taking a job at Disneyland. "I worked at Disneyland for about five years as a janitor. Only we weren't called janitors, we were called custodial hosts. One of my duties was to clean out the attractions at night. It was great to be left in the Haunted Mansion all alone. Another duty was to clean up after someone if they got sick on the Revolving Teacup ride. Like I said, it was great to be left in the
Haunted Mansion all alone."



After he graduated from college with a B.F.A. in Illustration, he headed for the Big Apple with a small portfolio of illustrations.



Since then his work has appeared on the covers of The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times
Magazine, The Boston Globe, Sierra, American Bookseller, The Progressive, Time, Newsweek,
Mother Jones, and Ms.



"A lot of reviewers have misidentified my technique as airbrush or dyes or even egg tempera. I
think this is because it almost looks as if it was sprayed with paint with little dots of color and texture visible. Actually, my work is rendered in oil paints. I paint on board, building up several thin glazes of the oil, sealing them between coats with an acrylic spray varnish. This not only dries the oil instantly, but also causes a chemical reaction between the oil and the acrylic. Normally, it would be a mistake to combine two opposites like this and in fact it was a mistake the first time I
did it, but I liked the results. I'm a big fan of artists who play with surfaces. I love texture and grunge. The trick is to know when to stop. Sometimes I keep adding more and more layers until
I've ruined the piece. Usually I stop when the painting starts to look interesting. Then I go in with a fine brush and add details, lights and darks, etc. It's a laborious process, but it's unpredictable and it keeps me interested and surprised. Of course, I'm influenced by other illustrators too, like
N.C. Wyeth, Maurice Sendak, Arthur Rackham, Edward Lear, Gustav Dore and Tomi Ungerer. I
hope I can follow the path these dark illustrators have walked, or at least use the sidewalk that runs alongside it."

copyright ? 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Multiple award-winning author Jon Scieszka grew up in Flint, Michigan, the second oldest and the nicest of six boys. Jon went to school at Culver Military Academy in Indiana where he was a Lieutenant; Albion College in Michigan where he studied to be a doctor; and Columbia University in New York, where he got a M.F.A. in fi ction. He taught elementary school in New York for ten years in a variety of positions. In addition to his work as an author, Jon also runs a web-based literacy program called “Guys Read” that is designed to encourage boys, particularly reluctant readers, to get involved with books. Currently, he lives in Brooklyn, NY with his wife and two kids.

Recently, Jon was named the country’s first National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, a joint effort of the Library of Congress and the Children’s Book Council. During his two-year role as Ambassador, he will act as a spokesperson for children’s literature, speaking to groups of parents, teachers, and children to encourage the importance of reading.


LANE SMITH was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma on August
25th, 1959. His family moved to Corona,
California when he was three, but spent the better part of every summer back in Oklahoma. "My family would take the old Route 66 highway. I think that's where my bizarre sense of design comes from. Once you've seen a 100-foot cement buffalo on top of a donut-stand in the middle of nowhere, you're never the same."



Lane has one brother, whose name is Shane. "Shane and Lane. My Mom thought this was funny.
Really. A real hoot. However, HER brothers were named Dub, Cubby, Leo and Billy- Joe! My
Dad's brothers were Tom and Jerry! I SWEAR this is true!"



"I had a great childhood. We lived in the foothills, and my brother and I spent all of our after-school time exploring, building forts, collecting lizards, etc. My favorite time of year was
Fall, when the wind would start up and the air grew colder. I lived for Halloween and I loved the old Universal studios' monster movies. Shane and I would watch them, then read each other horror stories with titles like Tales to Tremble By. The foothills were full of dry bushes and desert trees and in the Fall we'd get a lot of creepy looking tumbleweeds blowing through our backyard at night. I used to lay awake in bed and imagine what wild adventures might be happening in the hills. I think some of those memories later evolved into THE BIG PETS.



Lane supplemented the money his parents were putting towards his college tuition by taking a job at Disneyland. "I worked at Disneyland for about five years as a janitor. Only we weren't called janitors, we were called custodial hosts. One of my duties was to clean out the attractions at night. It was great to be left in the Haunted Mansion all alone. Another duty was to clean up after someone if they got sick on the Revolving Teacup ride. Like I said, it was great to be left in the
Haunted Mansion all alone."



After he graduated from college with a B.F.A. in Illustration, he headed for the Big Apple with a small portfolio of illustrations.



Since then his work has appeared on the covers of The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times
Magazine, The Boston Globe, Sierra, American Bookseller, The Progressive, Time, Newsweek,
Mother Jones, and Ms.



"A lot of reviewers have misidentified my technique as airbrush or dyes or even egg tempera. I
think this is because it almost looks as if it was sprayed with paint with little dots of color and texture visible. Actually, my work is rendered in oil paints. I paint on board, building up several thin glazes of the oil, sealing them between coats with an acrylic spray varnish. This not only dries the oil instantly, but also causes a chemical reaction between the oil and the acrylic. Normally, it would be a mistake to combine two opposites like this and in fact it was a mistake the first time I
did it, but I liked the results. I'm a big fan of artists who play with surfaces. I love texture and grunge. The trick is to know when to stop. Sometimes I keep adding more and more layers until
I've ruined the piece. Usually I stop when the painting starts to look interesting. Then I go in with a fine brush and add details, lights and darks, etc. It's a laborious process, but it's unpredictable and it keeps me interested and surprised. Of course, I'm influenced by other illustrators too, like
N.C. Wyeth, Maurice Sendak, Arthur Rackham, Edward Lear, Gustav Dore and Tomi Ungerer. I
hope I can follow the path these dark illustrators have walked, or at least use the sidewalk that runs alongside it."

copyright ? 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2011

    good seiries

    good book but dosent make sence if you havent read the other books.its about three kids who go foraward in time and find cool robots in the future and they have this book that goet them into all kinds of trouble

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2005

    Great!

    I read these when I was a kid and, I didn't know they were still making these! Plus, there's a show on TV now!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2014

    This was a good book

    It was about three kids bein chased by robots

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    Ggggg

    The turd ate a frog eiei o

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2012

    From my 7 yr old: I love "the time warp trio". My fav

    From my 7 yr old: I love "the time warp trio". My favorite part was the SellBots. Every time they open the book the three boys go somewhere in time and get in trouble.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2011

    My first rating under 5 stars

    It wasn't bad but it could have been better I liked how Sciezka chaged it up a bit by sending the trio forward in time instead of back

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews

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