2112

2112

4.9 11
by Rush
     
 

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This Canadian power trio established their sound with a radio-friendly riff on their first two albums and swung for the cerebral fences on Caress of Steel -- but it wasn't until this fourth trip to the plate that Rush struck a perfect balance between rock and an art place. The archetypal Rush disc, 2112 is laden with high

Overview

This Canadian power trio established their sound with a radio-friendly riff on their first two albums and swung for the cerebral fences on Caress of Steel -- but it wasn't until this fourth trip to the plate that Rush struck a perfect balance between rock and an art place. The archetypal Rush disc, 2112 is laden with high concept and headbang-inducing moments, rich textures, and thesaurus-emptying tales -- all of which pour from the titular suite, which, back in the days of vinyl, took up an entire album side. More than two decades on, the seven-part "2112" still packs plenty of portent, thanks in part to Neil Peart's ominous lyrics and the constantly shifting musical construction, which alternates between sleek, futuristic sound washes (courtesy of keyboardist Hugh Syme) and Alex Lifeson's pulsing power chords. Remarkably, the pretense never bubbles over -- well, okay, "The Temple of Syrinx" is a bit much -- and the band remember to counterbalance the heaviness with a series of short, sharp songs that rank with their most memorable. "A Passage to Bangkok" and "Something for Nothing" both kick into high gear quickly, while Geddy Lee's emotive "Tears" provides a lovely respite.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Greg Prato
Whereas Rush's first two releases, their self-titled debut and Fly by Night, helped create a buzz among hard rock fans worldwide, the more progressive third release, Caress of Steel, confused many of their supporters. Rush knew it was now or never with their fourth release, and they delivered just in time -- 1976's 2112 proved to be their much sought-after commercial breakthrough and remains one of their most popular albums. Instead of choosing between prog rock and heavy rock, both styles are merged together to create an interesting and original approach. The entire first side is comprised of the classic title track, which paints a chilling picture of a future world where technology is in control (Peart's lyrics for the piece being influenced by Ayn Rand). Comprised of seven "sections," the track proved that the trio members were fast becoming rock's most accomplished instrumentalists. The second side contains shorter selections, such as the Middle Eastern-flavored "A Passage to Bangkok" and the album-closing rocker "Something for Nothing." 2112 is widely considered by Rush fans as their first true "classic" album, the first in a string of similarly high-quality albums.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/06/1997
Label:
Mercury
UPC:
0731453462625
catalogNumber:
534626
Rank:
275

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2112 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
wareagle2010 More than 1 year ago
When I was 20 the time this real master piece came out,I was living and still do in a small city in southeast Alabama.We were just local heads having fun and waiting for concerts to come to town.Then one day we found out that Kiss and a group called rush were coming to town.We were all excited about Kiss never really listened to rush.Well Rush opened forKiss and let me tell ya Rush just blew the place done.Me being a drummer and seeing Neil Peart lower in to his drum kit was totaly the best I have ever seen.Now my son all of 19 has said that as well, he to being a drummer of this age.I became a Rush fathful from that great night on.Rock on my brothers and sisters.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of those albums where a noticeable decline can be felt between what was sides one and two. The first side, the bombastic rock-opera '2112', is first-rate classic Rush, full of headbanging chords, hypnotic solos and enough variety to keep one hanging on for more. The second side features merely average songs. Fans will probably appreciate vaguely proggish hard rockers like 'A Passage to Bangkok' and 'Something For Nothing', but they are far from being the band's most memorable tunes. Overall, I'd give Side One five stars, and Side Two three stars, which averages out to four, as you can see above.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Simply said, if you have ANY Rush albums and don't have 2112, you're not a Rush fan. The title track is downright wicked all the way through. The rest of the songs are top of the line Rush classics. In my opinion, 'Tears' is a little out of place with the heavy tone of the rest of the album, but as any Rush fan knows - there's gotta be one slow song... Overall, this album is one of the ultimate Rush albums. Personally, its my favorite.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The title track has to be heard to be believed. ''Art rock that demands being played and decibel level 10.'' The true debt to Ayn Rand is how it makes you think and makes your blood boil, all at once (in this sense, they are allready precursoring the lyrics of Cygnus X-1, in the style of 2112) If you couldn't get ''Caresses of Steel'' or ''Hemispheres'', don't dispair that this is also considered an art rock album, the differences are night and day. It is the fullfillment of the promise to greatness made in ''By-Tor and the Snow Dog''. The other tracks are good, but easily could have been put on Fly by Night, or Farewell to Kings, without any sense of discontinuity. My sense is that the album was listened to one side a time, when it was made.
Guest More than 1 year ago
let it be known for sure rushs classic album, 2112 is a verry powerful recording. the20 minute title track is incredible and the rest of the tracks are greatya got to get this cd.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although the sci-fi style writing may be somewhat dated, and the synths sound cheesy sometimes, this is still a must have for any Rush fan, or any serious rock fan for that matter. Great stuff.
RCN61 More than 1 year ago
In my opinion, this album represents the best of Rush and is in the top ten of all albums ever. In its time (I was 18 when it came out), it was astounding as it combined the complexity, depth, and musicianship of the best of progressive music, without bombastic excess, with accessible and entertaining hard rock that rivaled any band of its day. Maybe more importantly, it holds up now, over 30 years later. A classic, up there with Dark Side of the Moon, Led Zeppelin II, Nevermind, and other seminal albums of their day. My 18 year old son, who plays guitar and is way into the music of today, agrees that this is one of the best albums he has ever heard. Pretty impressive. A must for anyone who is serious about rock or progressive music. As for the relatively tepid comments about the shorter songs, they made more sense when albums had two sides. The first side was the 2112 suite, which was 20 minutes of thematic music. The second side was not intended to correspond in any way to 2112; rather, it complements it by providing short, tight songs that are much more accessible to the average listener. However, they are all great. Unfortunately, because 2112 is so amazing, they pale somewhat in comparison. But taken alone, A Passage to Bangkok, Something for Nothing, Tears, etc., each stand up well to other, similar songs on Hemispheres, A Farewell to Kings, Moving Pictures, Etc. An incredible album that I still listen to often.
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