22 Immutable Laws of Branding: How to Build a Product or Service into a World-Class Brand

22 Immutable Laws of Branding: How to Build a Product or Service into a World-Class Brand

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by Al Ries, Laura Ries
     
 
Branding. Dubbed by many the "marketing buzzword" of the late nineties, everyone knows that building your product or service into a bona fide brand is the only way to cut through the clutter in today's insanely crowded marketplace.

The only question is, how do you do it?

Learn the laws of branding in the branding bible:

The 22 Immutable

Overview

Branding. Dubbed by many the "marketing buzzword" of the late nineties, everyone knows that building your product or service into a bona fide brand is the only way to cut through the clutter in today's insanely crowded marketplace.

The only question is, how do you do it?

Learn the laws of branding in the branding bible:

The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding. Brilliant, bold, and mercifully brief, The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding is the definitive text on branding, distilling the complex principles and theories espoused in other long-winded, high-priced professional marketing tomes into twenty-two quick and easy-to-read vignettes. Pairing the brand-blazing strategies from the world's best—like Coca-Cola, Xerox, BMW, Federal Express, and Starbucks—with the world-renowned marketing savvy of bestselling author Al Ries and his daughter Laura Ries, The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding builds on the huge international success of The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing and provides the expert insight you seek on business's hottest topic in less time than an airplane ride.

Find out:

Why you will fail to create a brand through advertising, sales promotion, public relations, or fancy packaging

How overbranding equals underwhelming

Why a brand in any category should welcome others like it

How to define your category...even if you're not first to market

Why creating a sense of authenticity may be even more important than five-star quality

How to use advertising to keep your brand alive

Why no brand lives forever—and how best to read its vital signs and put it out of its misery yourself

Why good old-fashioned publicity may be the missing link in the brand-building process

Why giving your brand the right name is perhaps more important than the brand itself

and perhaps most important of all:

How to own a word in the mind of the consumer

Smart and accessible, The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding is an easy-to-refer-to primer that provides the ammo you need to dominate your category and turn your product or service into a world-class brand.

Author Biography: Al Ries is perhaps the world's best-known marketing strategist. He is the coauthor of such international bestsellers as The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding and Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind and the author of Focus: The Future of Your Company Depends on It. His daughter Laura Ries is a graduate of Northwestern University and a partner in their marketing strategy firm, Ries & Ries in Roswell, Georgia. She is the coauthor of The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding. Together they speak and consult with major companies around the globe.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780887309373
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/1998
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.85(w) x 8.65(h) x 0.90(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

The Law of Expansion


The power of a brand is inversely proportional to its scope.Think Chevrolet. What immediately comes to mind?

Having trouble? It's understandable.

Chevrolet is a large, small, cheap, expensive car ... or truck.When you put your brand name on everything, that name loses its power. Chevrolet used to be the best-selling automobile brand in America. No longer. Today Ford is the leader.

Think Ford. Same problem. Ford and Chevrolet, once very powerful brands, are burning out. Slowly heading for the scrap heap.

Ford buyers talk about their Tauruses, Or their Broncos. Or their Explorers. Or their Escorts.

Chevrolet buyers talk about their ... Well, what do Chevy buyers talk about? Except for the Corvette, there are no strong brands in the rest of the Chevrolet car line. Hence, Chevy's brand-image problem.

Chevrolet has ten separate car models. Ford has eight. That's one reason Ford outsells Chevrolet. The power of a brand is inversely proportional to its scope.Why does Chevrolet market all those models? Because it wants to sell more cars. And in the short term, it does. But in the long term, it undermines its brand name in the mind of the consumer.

Short term versus long term. Do you broaden the line in order to increase sales in the short term? Or do you keep a narrow line in order to build the brand in the mind and increase sales in the future?

Do you build the brand today in order to move merchandise tomorrow? Or do you expand the brand today in order to move the goods today and see it decline tomorrow?

The emphasis in most companies is on the short term. Line extension, megabranding, variable pricing, and a host of othersophisticated marketing techniques are being used to milk brands rather than build them. While milking may bring in easy money in the short term, in the long term it wears down the brand until it no longer stands for anything.

What Chevrolet did with automobiles, American Express is doing with credit cards. AmEx used to be the premier, prestige credit card. Membership had its privileges. Then it started to broaden its product line with new cards and services, presumably to increase its market share. AmEx's goal was to become a financial supermarket.

In 1988, for example, American Express had a handful of cards and 27 percent of the market. Then it started to introduce a blizzard of new cards including: Senior, Student, Membership Miles, Optima, Optima Rewards Plus Gold, Delta SkyMiles Optima, Optima True Grace, Optima Golf, Purchasing, and Corporate Executive, to name a few. The goal, according to the CEO, was to issue twelve to fifteen new cards a year.

American Express market share today: 18 percent.

Levi Strauss has done the same with blue jeans. In order to appeal to a wider market, Levi introduced a plethora of different styles and cuts, including baggy, zippered, and wide-leg jeans. At one point, Levi's jeans were available in twenty-seven different cuts. And if you could not find a pair of jeans off the rack to fit, Levi's would even custom cut jeans to your exact measurements. Yet over the past seven years the company's share of the denim jeans market has fallen from 31 to 19 percent.

Procter & Gamble has done the same with toothpaste.

The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding. Copyright © by Al Ries. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

What People are saying about this

Scott Kay
This book is like a synthesizer. Using an impressive list of the world's best-known brands, it fine tunes the art of branding to its optimum levels, enabling you to make the right marketing decisions with utmost confidence.
Philip Kotler
Al Ries demonstrates that marketers need two skills: building a brand and keeping it alive. Through stellar company profiles and keen insights, this book will show them how, whether they're entrepreneurs or seasoned veterans.
Patrick M. Sullivan
Al Ries's laws of marketing turned my software company into a worldwide brand and the dominant player in a whole new software category. Anyone looking to market their company successfully has to read The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding.
Philip J. Romano
I could only wish that I'd had access to this book at the start of my career, the insights it provides are indispensable to anyone seeking to build their business into a recognized brand.

Meet the Author

Al Ries is perhaps the world's best-known marketing strategist. He is the coauthor of such international bestsellers as The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding and Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind and the author of Focus: The Future of Your Company Depends on It.

His daughter Laura Ries is a graduate of Northwestern University and a partner in their marketing strategy firm, Ries & Ries in Roswell, Georgia. She is the coauthor of The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding. Together they speak and consult with major companies around the globe.

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The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding: How to Build a Product or Service into a World-Class Brand 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book focuses solely on the marketing strategy involved in building a brand. However, those of us who are familiar with brand initiatives know that the most difficult part is internal IMPLEMENTATION. This book does not focus on the implementation or organizational change necessary for a successful brand initiative. How do you make sure that all of your employees are on the same track? When your advertising offers one thing, but your employees deliver something else, how do you resolve that conflict? This book fails to answer these fundamental problems.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i am an employee of a large company in india and must say that this book has given me the divine inspiration to start my own business as soon as possible. the confidence and the conviction that this book provides with its very realistic and accurate observations and insights makes it a must read. though at some points, the book tends to make radical observations which do surprise you at times, considering that all success does not depend on a strategy,and more on its implementation, with regard to timing and other situations, which cannot be ignored. yet, it is a most truthful book, and for those who would love to be on top of a successful business should read it and consider it very seriously.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book in one night while visiting my sister in the hospital. It was a very exciting experience, I had butterflies in my stomach the whole time. I gave it to my business partner, and in a matter of days, we had refocused our web-based business, and started on the correct path again. It's easy in business to start thinking about what else you can sell your customers, and how to reach a bigger crowd. Both of these are mistakes, I believe. Amazon is an absolutely perfect example. Amazon=books. All the other stuff they're hawking just makes them harder to define, and therefore less powerful in the customer's mind. The guy who wrote the previous review obviously is confusing several concepts (and he's practically impossible to understand!). I've read 'The Fifth Discipline' too, and while it's interesting, it really doesn't say much of anything. IF YOU OWN A BUSINESS, READ THIS BOOK, THEN READ IT AGAIN!