24/7: Time and Temporality in the Network Society

Overview

For better or worse, the information and communication revolution has transformed our economic, cultural, and political world. On an individual scale, many of the traditional social, political, and cultural habits of mind and ways of being that evolved under the regime of the clock are changing rapidly, including the way individuals save, spend, and optimize time. At the organizational level, the pacing of innovation, levels of production, and new product development are no longer temporally fixed due to the ...
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Overview

For better or worse, the information and communication revolution has transformed our economic, cultural, and political world. On an individual scale, many of the traditional social, political, and cultural habits of mind and ways of being that evolved under the regime of the clock are changing rapidly, including the way individuals save, spend, and optimize time. At the organizational level, the pacing of innovation, levels of production, and new product development are no longer temporally fixed due to the effects of living in a networked society and in the networked economy. 24/7 brings together leading thinkers from a variety of disciplines to analyze the differing relationships to time in an accelerated society. Offering much-needed insight and perspective into new issues and problems, this unique volume is the first to offer a wide range of cutting-edge thought on the new economic, cultural, and political world of the networked society. The book includes contributions from leading scholars in this area, such as Barbara Adam, Mike Crang, Thomas Hylland Erikson, and Geert Lovink.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This collection of thought-provoking essays addresses the relationship between contemporary times and technology, especially cybertechnology. In doing so, the essays demonstrate so very well Elliott Jaques' statement of the ultimate justification for studying time: “In the form of time is to be found the form of living.' For by developing this collection, Hassan and Purser—and the essays' authors—have made an important contribution to understanding both time and life in the early 21st century."
—Allen C. Bluedorn, author of The Human Organization of Time: Temporal Realities and Experience, University of Missouri-Columbia

“The authors gathered here are among the leading theorists of the new shift in dimensional thought. Original, provocative, and sophisticated, their arguments will have a profound impact on social theorists and the emerging generation of digital scholars.”
—Sean Cubitt, University of Melbourne

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780804751971
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press
  • Publication date: 5/30/2007
  • Series: Stanford Business Bks.
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


Robert Hassan is a Research Fellow in the Media and Communications Program at the University of Melbourne. Ronald E. Purser is a Professor of Management in the College of Business at San Francisco State University.
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Table of Contents


Foreword   Barbara Adam     ix
Contributors     xiii
Introduction   Robert Hassan   Ronald E. Purser     1
Time in the Network Society
New Temporal Perspectives in the "High-Speed Society"   Carmen Leccardi     25
Network Time   Robert Hassan     37
Speed = Distance/Time: Chronotopographies of Action   Mike Crang     62
Protocols and the Irreducible Traces of Embodiment: The Viterbi Algorithm and the Mosaic of Machine Time   Adrian Mackenzie     89
Digital Time: Temporal Dimensions of Media and Culture
Truth at Twelve Thousand Frames per Second: The Matrix and Time-Image Cinema   Darren Tofts     109
The Fallen Present: Time in the Mix   Andrew Murphie     122
Stacking and Continuity: On Temporal Regimes in Popular Culture   Thomas Hylland Eriksen     141
Temporal Presence
Indifference of the Networked Presence: On Time Management of the Self   Geert Lovink     161
The Presence of Others: Network Experience as an Antidote to the Subjectivity of Time   Jack Petranker     173
CyberLack   David R. Loy     195
Time in the Network Economy
Time Robbers, Time Rebels: Limits to Fast Capital   Ben Agger     219
Finding Time and Place for Trust in ICT Network Organizations   Hans Ramo     235
The Clock-Time Paradox: Time Regimes in the Network Society   Ida H.J. Sabelis     255
Index     279
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